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Old 05-19-17, 02:40 PM   #26
philbob57
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Intervals aren't needed around here this week. Even walking against the wind is like an interval during normal times. :-)
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Old 05-19-17, 03:23 PM   #27
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I'm skeptical of anyone who claims to know what's best for everyone.

The article talks about cellular health and mitochondria but does not say how that translates to life in the real world?

It touches on muscle mass and endurance but doesn't talk the things that concern older people as we age - quality of life issues such as weight loss, sleep quality, the size of our prostates or lowering cholesterol and helping us live longer.



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Old 05-19-17, 08:20 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
Why not do both?

Fartlek, which means "speed play" in Swedish, is a training method that blends continuous training with interval training. Fartlek runs are a very simple form of a long distance run. Fartlek training “is simply defined as periods of fast running intermixed with periods of slower running."
Fartlek - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fartlek
That's my routine work-out, and I follow a coaching mp3 to maintaining timing and structure in 45 min and hour runs. Bikes are problemactic given that traffic and road condition interrupt a structured internal training plan. In fact, I went with a trainer because I get a better, or at least more predictable, bike workout in my garbage than on the road.

So my road bikes are for fun, but too many garbage miles to consider it a high value training program. I'd probably get into Peloton or Zwift but have too many toys already.

64, ran 15 miles the other morning then went to work. Something's working.
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Old 05-20-17, 12:44 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
...Why not do both?

Fartlek, which means "speed play" in Swedish, is a training method that blends continuous training with interval training. Fartlek runs are a very simple form of a long distance run. Fartlek training “is simply defined as periods of fast running intermixed with periods of slower running."
Fartlek - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fartlek
Good to know. I'm already practicing fartlek on my hilly rural route. Especially after drinking that yeast fermented homebrewed energy drink. And unpasteurized local beers, especially the strong, dark malty stuff. Plenty of fartlek in that brew.
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Old 05-20-17, 06:47 AM   #30
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I started serious interval training about a decade ago and now at the age of 52 I feel more fit than I ever have and I've been riding for over 30 years, at one time my commute was a 50-mile round trip. However, you quickly plateau if all you do is spin, regardless of mileage. I'm definitely healthier now.

I can consistently sprint a >30 mph and I'm a Clydesdale that has a heavy bike with loaded panniers. Going anaerobic keeps me young.

As for monks, I don't doubt that they live a long healthy life, as they say, there's more than one way to skin a cat. But I don't live like a monk, this is what makes me happy.
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Old 05-20-17, 07:43 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
....
@omnivor, maybe you would do better if your intervals were less intense. Needing a week to recover sounds like an indication you did something wrong. The more I do intervals, the more I enjoy them. But I haven't started enjoying pushups yet.
This takes me back to when I first started doing intervals. It use to be when I first started that I would feel like crap for a whole week after multiple sessions of very tough intervals, so bad that I had the feeling of being "over trained" with a fog-like feeling in my head and my resting HR would be really high. I won't argue that I over-did-it, but over time I stopped having these intense feelings of being over-trained. I still get tired and have to take time off, but I can't remember when the last time I've had that really bad feeling of being over-trained.

I can use weightlifting as an analogy. When I first started I would be very, very sore after a tough session, but over time it becomes very difficult to get that same feeling of soreness. I can now do things like deep squats, both in heavy weight and high reps and not feel much soreness the next day; however, I will feel weak and need recovery, but I'm don't have that feeling of "out of commission" like I use to.

I do believe we older folks have to push ourselves, because nature is constantly pushing against us, i.e. the force of ageing. If you do easy spinning and plateau, you won't be able to stay on that plateau; the effects of ageing will knock your ass off
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Old 05-20-17, 08:02 AM   #32
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This is getting to be kind of like a nice cheerleading thread. We're not perfect, but we're trying, learning our limits on each end of the too-hard-not-too-hard spectrum.

I started lifting about two years ago, after neglecting my upper body and core pretty much my whole life. I'm still learning exercises, so my routine is haphazard and not long enough, but I think soon enough, I'll craft one that works for me and is sufficient. Maybe we should have a thread where we each share our regimes and how they work for us.

I'm 56, and I've learned to live by this joking motto: I know I'm relatively healthy if today's aches and pains are different from yesterday's.
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