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  1. #1
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    almost 60 need a bike - recommendations?

    Hi - I will be 60 in September and plan to buy a bike. I am looking at hybrids. I will be using it to ride a paved surface in our park (with some big hills) and hope to use it for neigborhood riding as well. On occassion will be riding at Cape Cod on paved or hard pack bike trails. I have been smitten by the Bianchi - probably because I like their odd green - but want a light bike that is comfortable to ride - sort woman 5' 2" with pretty short legs. I hate hills but will be having to bike them! I remember big hills of childhood on my brother's clunky bike in the 50's. I know I don't want a racing posture - too hard on my back. I would appreciate advice. I like the look of the Bianchi Milano and Bianchi Boardwalk. Does anyone have experience with these? I plan to go sitting and choosing this weekend - help! Also saddles - comfy. And what are the major questions I should ask? I hear negatives about R & A in Brooklyn - that they are snooty with us non - racers. Hear better stuff about Bay Ridge on 3rd Avenue near 90th Street - anyone with thoughts about Brooklyn, NY stores? I live in Park Slope. Thanks

  2. #2
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    There is an REI store in New York, they are great to work with, offer the best return policy ever and they have good bikes for what you describe.

    Check out this link, then go to the store near you to see and ride.
    http://www.rei.com/online/store/Sear...CLINGundefined
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  3. #3
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    Looked on their site - no NY stores.

  4. #4
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    undefined
    Can't find an REI in NYC - I looked on their site. What do you know about the Bianchis I mentioned?

  5. #5
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gammy
    undefined
    Can't find an REI in NYC - I looked on their site. What do you know about the Bianchis I mentioned?
    They had one in White Plains a few years ago, I guess they closed it, sorry.
    I don't know any thing about the Bianchis, you might copy this post to the General Cycling Forum, many more readers than this one, I bet you will get more response, lots of NYC riders there. Good luck, Cannondale make nice comfort bikes, look at them, they are made on East Coast, and make a fine product.
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  6. #6
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    Thanks Shifty - I will.

  7. #7
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    Go with the Bianchi Boardwalk. If you are going to climb any hills, the gearing on it will make it easy. Go with the diamond frame as opposed to the step through frame. If you are going to climb hills, you will have to descend them so you want a bike that is stable and strong. A diamond frame is stronger and more stable.

    The Milano would be fine if you only intend to ride it on flat roads or trails.

    FYI, Bianchi bikes tend to fit women better because of a shorter top tube length.

    Spending around $500 for a first bike is about right. The situation is that you will either not ride it much or you will love riding so much that you will want to get a really good bike that costs $1500 or more. In either case, you will only be out $500.

    Have fun!!
    Last edited by Bacco; 06-30-05 at 05:33 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member joeprim's Avatar
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    Go find a place to ride a bunch and see what you feel comfortable with. All else in just marketing crap.

    Joe

  9. #9
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeprim
    Go find a place to ride a bunch and see what you feel comfortable with. All else in just marketing crap.
    Good advice from Joe. And don't be put off by "stuff" about the weakness of step through frames (woman's bike) either. For those who prefer skirts or have difficulty mounting a diamond frame, and don't need to be like Lance, such frames are more than adaquately strong and offer serious advantages.

  10. #10
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    One thing I would look at is the frame material. Aluminium will give an aged body a hard time, unless you have ridden aluminium before. I still ride aluminium Mountain bikes, but took out my very old Kona Explosif the other week (Chromoly steel) and I was surprised at how little jarring hit the body. Mind you, If I have a preference right now, it will always be my stiff Aluminin Bianchi for rides, as it does handle better, and climb hills easier. Which was the main reason I bought it in the first place.

    On the frame shape, unless you have a requirement for a step through frame, go for the conventional diamond frame. They are less prone to twisting, and give a better ride. That experience comes from two identical bikes My wifes and Mine from a few years ago, and they were top quality Raleighs, from when Raleigh made a good bike

    On the saddles, female posteriors require a wider saddle than males. Check the saddle in the shop and if not comfortable then, it will not get any more comfortable, Get the shop to change it before you buy.
    Last edited by stapfam; 06-30-05 at 01:21 PM.

  11. #11
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    Don't buy until you have test ridden a long wheel base (LWB) recumbent. Try the comfortable way to go before you commit. BK

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