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  1. #1
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    Oh what a pain the.............!

    I have been riding for about 2 months after my heart surgery to get the ticker back in shape. The heart seems fine but the bottom end is hurting. Someone suggested a good pair of bike shorts with a chamois.
    Any suggestions on what kind to buy to spare the naughty bits? Thanks
    J

  2. #2
    Senior Member Michigan's Avatar
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    You chose a great exercise, congrads. Road bike or mtn? I was under the assumption most chamois shorts were about equal. After you get some, I'd then make sure your saddle height/position/angle is right, then give it some time to get adjusted to the settings. I think your bike adjustments are the more important thing here.

  3. #3
    370H-SSV-0773H linux_author's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeHeart
    I have been riding for about 2 months after my heart surgery to get the ticker back in shape. The heart seems fine but the bottom end is hurting. Someone suggested a good pair of bike shorts with a chamois. Any suggestions on what kind to buy to spare the naughty bits? Thanks
    J
    - cheapest way (aside from making your own) is to purchase liners, such as those from nashbar:

    $19 padded Solstice brief

    - that way you can wear your own shorts...

    - if you're a big boy, you can always check out Mt. Borah's '+' [Plus] sizes - they also offer a liner:

    Plus sizes at Mt. Borah

    - as an aside, i remember making my own 'bike shorts' back in the 70s by sewing a large leather patch onto the crotch of a few pairs of favorite cutoffs... they worked fine (i was just careful to handwash and line dry when needed)

    - hope this helps!

    p.s. we *really* need an FAQ section/stickie for each Forum here on BF!

  4. #4
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    FRom one bypass recoverer to another? Well done on getting back so soon but don't push yourself too hard too soon.

    The problem of backside ache is a continual one that a lot of riders still have. First of all the saddle must be comfortable. Find one that is a little wider than you really think you should have as you will find yourself sitting a bit more upright than usuall. Bar height, fore and aft position of the saddle, saddle height all come into finding a comfortable position so a lot of adjusting to do yet. On the shorts side, I use lycra and I use bib shorts. Shorts come in various grades and the liners are generally of a man made substance nowadays, and not genuine chamois. Does not matter what it is really, as the chamois is not for padding- it is to wick away moisture from the vital areas, keeping them dry and so aleviating sores and chaffing. There is also a thicker padding that initially feels a bit uncomfortable as you have a nappy between you and the saddle. I don't find these any more comfortable than a good quality short but others swear by them for comfort. The main bit is to wear a padded short, or ordinary shorts with a liner, get the riding position comfortable, give time to get the backside attuned to the saddle, and finally if all else fails- change the saddle. On the shorts side, make certain they fit- try them on before purchase if possible- buy a good quality pair, and do not wear underpants underneath them. that is very important as rucks in undergarments hurt and hurt for a long time. May take some courage to do it, but one ride with chamois up against the skin and you will be going commando forever.

  5. #5
    Berry Pie..the Holy Grail GrannyGear's Avatar
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    Besides shorts, don't forget to stand up on the pedals and stretch with some frequency to give those sit down parts a rest and let blood circulate. You might also want to just get off the bike occasionally. If you can, push a little bit higher gear for a ways...pushing the pedals more forcefully can take a small but significant amount of weight off your sit areas. (I find light spinning recovery days harder on my butt than harder "push" days....get a little variety in the parts-that-hurt on any given ride.

    I may get roasted for this, but rubbing on a litte neosporin to those crotch areas that get chaffed, both before and after a ride, also seems to help.

    And finally, depending on your bike set up, you may tend to creep forward on the saddle as you ride....and riding the nose for any distance can be hard....best to move around on the saddle regularly-- eventually on longer rides, you may run out of comfortable places 8-)

  6. #6
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    thank you for the encouragement

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigan
    You chose a great exercise, congrads. Road bike or mtn? I was under the assumption most chamois shorts were about equal. After you get some, I'd then make sure your saddle height/position/angle is right, then give it some time to get adjusted to the settings. I think your bike adjustments are the more important thing here.
    Trek hybrid......

  8. #8
    Riding a bitsa
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    I'm with you there as a newbie (no heart issues). I had a duration of about 20 minutes on my bike which I got up to maybe 35 minutes after a while, but I needed a recovery period before I could think of riding again.

    I did three things:

    1. Bought a set of Pearl Izumi shorts with a 3D pad. That stopped the chafe dead in its tracks. These were expensive compared to what else I could get, but I figured that if the pants failed, I couldn't this way blame me buying crummy equipment.

    2. Bought a high quality saddle on eBay for the scary sum of $45. This has LESS padding and is THINNER than my older saddle that I couldn't stand. I reasoned the older saddle was hitting me wrong so thinner made as much sense as wider. I noted the good riders all use these thin saddles so they must know something. These guys are riding 100 miles thinking nothing of it!

    3. I relentlessly adjusted the saddle fore and aft, up and down until I found a position that worked. This took an hour of adjust, ride around the block, return, adjust, ride, adjust and then take a long run. I ended with a nose up attitude which looks a bit odd, but which works for me.

    I now ride as long as my legs and lungs can carry me. My limiter is no longer my ass.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DaveTaylor's Avatar
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    Plenty of good advice here, although I would avoid the "soft sell", gels and extra padding that just put more pressure on the soft tissues. If nothing here helps, I strongly recommend the Spongy Wonder Seat:http://www.spongywonder.com/. I am currently dealing with a serious prostate issue that would stop me from riding if it was not for this seat. This seat puts absolutely no pressure on any part of your butt other than the seat bones and for me is total comfort.

    Although I am using it on a road bike, it is probably better suited to those riding a more relaxed frame, that is in a more upright position. If you are on a road bike and are doing extended rides, I find that because this seat has no horn/nose there is a certain loss of bike control when standing on the peddles or when riding with one or no hands on the bars, in other words, it is a perfect seat, but, no necessarily a perfect bike seat.

  10. #10
    Rossy
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    Great idea to get on the bike. thats what I did after the a heart op and it gave me confidence and a great deal of fun. Think the best thing is to make sure your bike is set up properly for you, best done by people who know how. |Get a good saddle, I found small and thin works for me. Dont wear jocks under shorts, I use clear aquious cream around the tender parts. Some pain seems to be inevitable for a while.

    Good luck

  11. #11
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Hi,
    1)Get a good saddle
    2) good shorts
    3) a nonalcoholic skin cream or
    http://www.branfordbike.com/wearcare/wear4.html
    for where it rubs

  12. #12
    Member hjbiker43's Avatar
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    I'm using Pearl Izumi shorts and find them quite comfortable. I'm sure, though, that any name brand short with a good chamois will work. A comfortable saddle is also important - try one of WTB's line with the "love channel" (really works). BTW, what kind of heart surgery did you have? I'm scheduled for a mitral valve repair/replacement next month, so it's encouraging to see someone back on the bike so soon after surgery. Take care.

  13. #13
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    Get a long wheel base recumbent. It will solve all your pain problems from biking. Everything else is just 'stopgap' fixes. bk

  14. #14
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    Get a long wheel base recumbent. It will solve all your pain problems from biking. Everything else is just 'stopgap' fixes. bk

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