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Old 09-01-05, 06:17 AM   #1
djm3801
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Need typical advice..

Hello all, New to the forum.

I am 58 and never did any long distance cycling. In fact, have only some exercise bike experience since I was a kid. Want to try to get my body moving again before my brain says stop. Used to work out, have not for 2 years, and could lose 20 pounds. Enough of that..

I have been convinced that the old Nishiki road bike I have and the Huffy mountain bikes I inherited will kill me quickly. Also convinced that fit is everything. Also convinced that I am not ready to assume a road bike position and will almost never go off road. That said, a hybrid seems right to me, and my LBS agrees.

So - my budget is tight - while I hope I develop the liking for cycling and discipline needed, I may not. So - $300 - $400 is my area. I have seem Trek 7200 - 7300 / 7200FX - 7300FX and Giant Cypress spoken of here and have done a few searches for head to head comparisons. Was hoping that some of you here would have already done that research and can share your opinons.

Any feedback is appreciated (well most feedback!).

Dan
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Old 09-01-05, 06:47 AM   #2
jabike
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Welcome. They are all good bikes that you mentioned. But, I am older than you and continue to ride my road bike, a Lemond with a really laid out geometry. I also have a mountain bike and a hybrid (to name a few). My road bike gets ridden more than the rest. My personal opinion is that the road bike is the most comfortable to ride and when adjusted properly puts very little stress on the body.
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Old 09-01-05, 08:01 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djm3801
Hello all, New to the forum.

I am 58 and never did any long distance cycling. In fact, have only some exercise bike experience since I was a kid. Want to try to get my body moving again before my brain says stop. Used to work out, have not for 2 years, and could lose 20 pounds. Enough of that..

I have been convinced that the old Nishiki road bike I have and the Huffy mountain bikes I inherited will kill me quickly. Also convinced that fit is everything. Also convinced that I am not ready to assume a road bike position and will almost never go off road. That said, a hybrid seems right to me, and my LBS agrees.

So - my budget is tight - while I hope I develop the liking for cycling and discipline needed, I may not. So - $300 - $400 is my area. I have seem Trek 7200 - 7300 / 7200FX - 7300FX and Giant Cypress spoken of here and have done a few searches for head to head comparisons. Was hoping that some of you here would have already done that research and can share your opinons.

Any feedback is appreciated (well most feedback!).

Dan
How were you convinced that your current bikes would kill you quickly? I rode a walmart mtb for a while and it was good excercise and I bought a road bike when I had mechanical problems with it. I think any of the new bikes you mentioned would be ok.
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Old 09-01-05, 08:20 AM   #4
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My wife has an old Nishiki road bike. It is a lovely thing with a lugged steel frame and downtube shifters. With Armadillo tires, its even reliable. I think it a far better bike than any of the alternatives you mention. If you don't like the riding position, why not raise the handlebars? You could even replace the drops with something else, even riser bars.

Paul
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Old 09-01-05, 11:08 AM   #5
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If you are just coming back to cycling, but already have a couple of bikes, Why not wait and see if you really want to stay cycling? Use the bikes you currently have to find out if that is what you really want to do. Then you have say 6 months research or to save a few more $'s, to buy the style of bike you will want.

On the exercise front a bike- Any bike- is good for you so well done for realising that you need some fitness training. For this reason, I am saying use anything you have initially, find out the type of riding you may want to do, encourage a couple of neighbours to join in or find a neighbour that is just starting and see you at the top of the hills next spring on your new bike.
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Old 09-01-05, 11:32 AM   #6
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Here's my advice. After coming back to cycling at the beginning of the summer, I started riding an old 10 speed on the roads and paths that I would be riding on normally. As I looked at bikes and fought with my aches and pains, I decided on a hybrid. My LBL - all of them - wre more than happy to suggest this to me. Once they see someone who is older, that's the knee jerk suggestion.

As I kept riding, the aches and pains moved around and then disappeared. I rode longer and longer distances and got a better sense of what I wanted. I also saw the the position on the road bike allows - just as people saw here again and again - more hand positions and is more comfortable on longer rides.

So my suggestion to you is to ride the old bikes. I think you'll find that your idea of what kind of a bike you want will change a lot as you ride.

Remember that there are road bikes with flat top bars - something that I didn't know when I started cycling again. There are also cyclocross bikes which can take tires that are as large as the tires on the 7xxx trek series of bikes.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 09-01-05, 07:38 PM   #7
djm3801
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Folks,

good advice. It seems unanimous too! Guess I'll drag the Nishiki out of the shed and get a gel seat!

You know - the lure of a new toy is nice, but perhaps I should make the equipment I have work for me to see if this new pursuit is going to stick.

Thanks.

Dan
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Old 09-02-05, 07:24 AM   #8
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Gel saddles are not always a good idea. The soft pad may seem like a great idea, but it can lead to a distribution of your weight away from your "sit bones". It may feel great for a short trip around the block, but really awful after a few miles. Also, if you intend to wear normal clothing when you ride, the cloth covering can be quite abrasive and wear out the seat of your pants. Gel saddles are oftem much wider than optimum. I ride a bike with a bolt upright riding position, and was surprised how narrow the most comfortable saddle was. Talk to your local bike shop about a good plastic or leather saddle.

Paul
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Old 09-02-05, 08:03 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djm3801
Folks,

good advice. It seems unanimous too! Guess I'll drag the Nishiki out of the shed and get a gel seat!

You know - the lure of a new toy is nice, but perhaps I should make the equipment I have work for me to see if this new pursuit is going to stick.

Thanks.

Dan
Don't suggest that, either.

Good way to hurt your bottom!

Seat that fits your "sit bones" is what you want.

Have fun.
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Old 09-02-05, 05:53 PM   #10
djm3801
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Thanks again! I guess I'll go with a stock setup and some short rides to start.
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Old 09-04-05, 09:14 AM   #11
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So - my budget is tight - while I hope I develop the liking for cycling and discipline needed, I may not. So - $300 - $400 is my area. I have seem Trek 7200 - 7300 / 7200FX - 7300FX and Giant Cypress spoken of here and have done a few searches for head to head comparisons. Was hoping that some of you here would have already done that research and can share your opinons
Welcome to the return of biking! My wife and I purchased Trek Navigators for a geat multipurpose bike. We have riden on city streets, paved bike trails, dirt paths, chip & seal country roads, mountain bike trails and island beach sand. The Navigator will ride you pretty much where ever you want to go.

I bought a smaller Brontrager seat similar to the ones on the 7300's to fit my "sit bones" a little better. You will not go wrong with either of these bikes. I found that I like riding something new much, much better! Install a Cateye cycle computer and you will be ready! Have fun!
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