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Old 12-05-05, 12:39 AM   #1
overthehillmedi
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Another clipless question

Yes another clipless question to be hashed over.I walk with one foot splayed out to one side by about 30 degrees,it's genetic passed down by my great to the umpteenth grandfather to all of his male decendents. Thanks Grandpa. Now I am in the process of having a touring bike built for me and need to find a clipless system that will not cause me to many problems to use. I notice that when I ride using platforms that my foot is turned out so having my foot fixed in straight ahead would probably cause me grief in the long run (pedal). So what system would the great minds on this page recommend? Thanks for your comments.
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Old 12-05-05, 01:04 AM   #2
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Other more knowledgable posters will soon chime in, but you might consider Speedplays. They offer a very wide range (some almost 30 degrees of very loosey goosey "float" so your foot can find and keep a more natural-to-you angle. As a tourer, you may not like walking around on cleats...so consider SPD's. Finally, for about $20 or so dollars, Power Grips attached to your platform pedals might give you the freedom of movement you want--and adequate-for-touring attachment to the pedal.

Some user comments on Power Grips: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_87805.shtml
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Old 12-05-05, 07:23 AM   #3
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Another thing to think about is Kneesavers to prevent you from hitting your ankle against the crank arm.
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Old 12-05-05, 09:20 AM   #4
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Because you are splay-footed does not mean that your knees are crooked. It means your ankle and foot are shaped a little peculiar. Almost everyone with splay feet has fewer knee problems on a bike with their feet facing straight forward.
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Old 12-05-05, 12:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrannyGear
Other more knowledgable posters will soon chime in, but you might consider Speedplays. They offer a very wide range (some almost 30 degrees of very loosey goosey "float" so your foot can find and keep a more natural-to-you angle. As a tourer, you may not like walking around on cleats...so consider SPD's. Finally, for about $20 or so dollars, Power Grips attached to your platform pedals might give you the freedom of movement you want--and adequate-for-touring attachment to the pedal.

Some user comments on Power Grips: http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_87805.shtml
Just be aware that there are two types of Speedplays for road bikes; named Zero and X Series. One (X series) has the virtually unlimited range of motion talked about above and the other has adjustable "float" to a maximum of 15 degrees. Each type comes in three price levels depending on material used in the pedal. I have used Speedplays (X) for nearly 10 years and really like them. Be advised that if you get the X Series, on the first few rides they will seem a bit goosey as you will probably not be used to so much float. But soon you will get used to it and, I think, love it. And you can get cleat covers to protect them while you are walking around.
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Old 12-05-05, 07:30 PM   #6
FarHorizon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclintom
...Almost everyone with splay feet has fewer knee problems on a bike with their feet facing straight forward.
I must (again!) be the exception. My toes naturally splay out and having my feet face straight forward (via clips or clipless) is uncomfortable to both my ankles and my knees. Might I ask where you got this info? (I'm not trying to be confrontational - I'm just curious). Thanks!
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Old 12-05-05, 10:10 PM   #7
flatlander_48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overthehillmedi
Yes another clipless question to be hashed over.I walk with one foot splayed out to one side by about 30 degrees,it's genetic passed down by my great to the umpteenth grandfather to all of his male decendents. Thanks Grandpa. Now I am in the process of having a touring bike built for me and need to find a clipless system that will not cause me to many problems to use. I notice that when I ride using platforms that my foot is turned out so having my foot fixed in straight ahead would probably cause me grief in the long run (pedal). So what system would the great minds on this page recommend? Thanks for your comments.
I have a similar problem, but it is both ankles and due to arthritis. I don't think the problem relates to the degree of float. There is no reason that you, or I, should need more float than anyone else. However, I think the important thing is to get the foot and the pedal in the proper relationship to one another. When you position your cleat on the shoe, it will have an angle that matches the 30 degrees that you mentioned. But, that will put your heel too close to the bike. Assuming that your legs are straight, your heel needs to be in the same place as folks with straight legs and feet. The ball of the foot needs to be further away from the bike to get the heel in the right place and prevent a forced inward rotation of your foot. I use the Pedal Axle Extension from High Sierra Cyclery http://www.hscycle.com/Pages/cantsandwedges.html This allows me to get the ball of my feet away from the bike, keeps me from having to rotate my feet inward and stop hitting the chain stays with my heels. The only hooker is that unless you get the extensions drilled out, you can't use clipless pedals that only have a hex socket for tightening and no wrench flats. For liability reasons I assume, the High Sierra folks are reluctant to do this.
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