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Old 01-13-06, 10:32 PM   #1
JEgan712
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New bike came without pedals

Just bought my first road bike. A 05' Bianchi Vigorelli. Low and behold, it has no pedals. I think I need to get "clipless pedals" Is that correct? I would appreciate any advice on what kind of pedals to put on this bad boy and also what kind of shoes to get. If you get a certain kind of pedal, do you then have to get a shoe that is compatible to that pedal? Or do all shoes fit all pedals? I want/need good pedals and shoes, but only for touring and fairly serious conditioning rides (20 to 35 miles or so).

Thanks
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Old 01-13-06, 11:19 PM   #2
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Are you new to road cycling? I would recommend starting out with an ordinary set of platform pedals. Give yourself a month or two to get accustomed to the handling and shifting characteristics of your new bike. You'll want to be steady on your bike before trying clipless pedals.
To answer your question, the pedals and the cleats form a unified system; when you buy the pedals the cleats come with the package. I believe most road shoes will accomodate (or can be adapted to) most cleats, but check before you buy. My guess (from observing fellow roadies) is that more than half use LOOK or LOOK-type pedal systems, but there are countless varieties out there. Don't lock yourself in (pun) to a particular system without giving yourself plenty of time to do your due diligence.
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Old 01-13-06, 11:36 PM   #3
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Probably left the kickstand off, too.
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Old 01-14-06, 02:13 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEgan712
Just bought my first road bike. A 05' Bianchi Vigorelli. Low and behold, it has no pedals. I think I need to get "clipless pedals" Is that correct? I would appreciate any advice on what kind of pedals to put on this bad boy and also what kind of shoes to get. If you get a certain kind of pedal, do you then have to get a shoe that is compatible to that pedal? Or do all shoes fit all pedals? I want/need good pedals and shoes, but only for touring and fairly serious conditioning rides (20 to 35 miles or so).

Thanks
I ride a mointain bike and the majority of Clipless pedals used on these are the Shimano SPD type. Varying qualities and prices, but I have used the cheapest they make for at least 5 years and still they are unserviced and still good. One advantage of the Mountain bike shoes is the variety. You can get them for full off road mudplugging with studs for when you have to walk, or a trainer type one that has a grippy sole for walking. The SPD's may not be de rigeur on road bikes but it is that walkability with the shoes that gives them and advantage over some of the road specific shoes.

Then of course- if you do not fancy being tied to the bike- you could always get a top quality flat pedal and toe clips, but I think most of the experienced bikers here will suggest that you do go clipless.

As to the bike-- You only have to mention bianchi and I start drooling so hope you enjoy the ride.
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Old 01-14-06, 06:00 AM   #5
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Add my vote for SPD. I have the same pedals on both my bikes--- which have the clip on one side and are regular platforms on the other. Gives me flexibility, although I usually ride clipped, but when making adjustments in the driveway, it helps not to be. Nashbar sells them.

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Old 01-14-06, 07:11 AM   #6
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I'm with pastorbobnlnh; look at the Nashbar/SPD/combo. Cheap, too. I swap them between my beater and 'cross as the ride dictates. . .they're heavy as homemade sin, tho' and I'll trade them up soon on the 'cross.
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Old 01-14-06, 07:29 AM   #7
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+1 for SPD Mtn Bike clipless (which is a misnomer, by the way).

And, I need to give a great big plug for Shimano SPD riding sandals to go with them. Since I got mine 2 years ago, I have never, ever used my "regular" mtn bike shoes. The sandals are SO comfortable.

All Mtn Bike shoes allow one to walk on regular floor surfaces quite easily. The other day, I put on the wrong sandals (mtn bike instead of my regular ones) for just doing chores, such as driving to the doctor. Didn't even know I had them on until I was walking on a tile floor and heard the different sound they make. They are available many places. Here is one testimony from Sheldon Brown.

http://harriscyclery.net/site/showit...ory&Catalog=39

I also use them in the winter with warm socks. And they are MUCH less expensive!

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Old 01-14-06, 07:50 AM   #8
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I use Look pedals and an ergo Diadora road shoe, but use those exclusively for road riding. The pedals are simple to use, have a big platform, they have a lot of "float" (pivot the foot back sideways in the pedal) and are easy to clip in and out of. I've migrated to their carbon version not for the weight reduction but for the smoothness of the ride. I could not find another Look model that didn't develop an extremely annoying squeak between the pedal and the cleat over time. The carbon model is smooth and quiet.

The Diadora shoe has been an extremely comfortable, good fitting shoe and at a reasonable price compared to other models. The Ergo model has a ratcheted strap which has really helped me as my feet are pretty-no--they are very narrow. My pair have the nylon sole and have been very durable and are stiff enough for me. The higher priced shoes have carbon soles that are stiffer and probably a little lighter. There are LOTS of different makes and models out there and would suggest finding a shoe that feels okay and are a good fit for your feet.

Like Stapfam discussed, you might consider an "off road" shoe and pedal system, especially if you're thinking of doing touring. They are much easier to walk around with than standard road shoes.

I would recommend going clipless when you're comfortable doing so, however. It's just a personal preference, but I've trained myself to use more of the full pedaling stroke with the clipless pedals which makes it easier on both legs over the long run. One way you can help learn that is by unclipping with one foot and using the other foot to pedal completely around. I do that on my trainer for various time lengths and it seems to help me get better at it. When I ride I can look at my cadence and see the cadence increase with no increase in effort when I concentrate on "pedaling in circles"-- as opposed to just mashing down on both sides.
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Old 01-14-06, 08:06 AM   #9
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FWIW -

Some thoughts on pedaling techniques from our friend Sheldon Brown:

Quote:
Ankling
Some older cycling books and articles recommend the practice of "ankling." This refers to changing the angle of the foot fairly drastically during the course of the pedal stroke, so that the toe is pointed upward at the top of the stroke, and downward at the bottom. The idea is to make more use of the muscles of the lower leg, and to permit "pedaling in circles", i.e., applying more force to the cranks at top and bottom dead center.
This practice is pretty much discredited these days. If carried to an extreme, it can cause injury. This happened to me when I was a teen-ager; I had read about ankling, and had just acquired my first pair of toe clips, just before setting out on my first overnight tour. I ankled for about the first 30-40 miles, when there was a sudden sharp pain in one of my Achilles tendons. I had to lower the saddle, remove the toe clips, and finish out the 4 day tour pedaling on my arches, because I couldn't bear the slightest load on the front of my foot, pulling on the Achilles tendons. For about a month thereafter, I would need to massage my Achilles tendons for about 5 minutes each morning before I would be able to walk. 40 years later, I've still not completely recovered from this injury.

And our other friend, Jobst Brandt

Jobst Brandt on Ankling

Quote:
Ankling, a topic of much discussion, has been claimed to improve performance in bicycling, although not by racers and coaches. It has been touted as one of the techniques for excellence that appeals to bicyclists mainly because it requires no additional effort. That there are different ankle motions while pedaling is apparent, although most of these are not by choice nor do they effect efficiency. Because so much attention was given the subject in the 1960's, it prompted a study in Italy, in which some leading racers noted for their abilities as well as a distinct pedaling style were fit with instrumentation to numerically capture the stroke. Among them was Jacques Anquetil who had a noticeably different ankle motion.

The study determined that there was no consistency among those tested and that ankling, much like people's walking gait, is caused by physical individuality rather than any advantage. Typically, some walking gaits are so pronounced that a person can be recognized by it at a distance. Some people raise their heel before stepping off on the next stride while others "peel" the foot from the floor in a continuous motion. To artificially emulate someone's ankle motion or lack thereof, while pedaling, is as useless as emulating a walking gait. The study laid ankling to rest for a while, but because urban legends have a life of their own, rising again at the slightest opportunity, ankling, with its lore, is assured a long life.
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Old 01-14-06, 08:40 AM   #10
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JEgan712
I have both Look pedals and SPD pedals and swap them around. After a couple of years with them I am much more inclined to use the SPD for a couple of reasons.
Road shoes with look clips on them are impossible to walk with. The look clips are plastic and if you do walk on them, they wear down quickly. The look clips are the most comfortable when clipped and riding but are the most difficult to clip into when taking off from a stop sign. The are equally easy to unclip from the pedals.
I use a pair of MTB shoes with the SPD pedals and they weigh a bit more than the road shoes. The MTB shoes are easy to walk in, easier to clip into the pedals, and since the clips are metal, they seem to be very sturdy and long-lasting.
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Old 01-14-06, 03:30 PM   #11
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I agree that if you're new to road cycling it makes sense to start out with some platform pedals for a little while. That said, once you're ready to make the move to clipless pedals and cycling shoes it's one of the best enhancements to your riding experience I can imagine. The difference in how well you can transfer power to the pedals and the wheels is amazing the first time you try it.

Others here have mentioned some very good pedals; let me also say a good word about Speedplay pedals. They're simple to clip in and out of, and in 1000+ miles of riding so far on the pair I've got, I've never had an unintended release. One thing that I like about them is that, unlike some other pedals, they have no "up" or "down" side... you can clip into either side equally well, which means less fiddling when you're clipping in. Also, I like having a little bit of "float" -- the ability to rotate your foot laterally a little bit while clipped in. Float is supposed to be good for bad knees; regardless of whether or not it is, I just like the feel of having a little. I use Speedplay Zero pedals, which allow you to adjust the amount of float.

Enjoy the new bike!
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Old 01-14-06, 04:08 PM   #12
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SPDs using mountain shoes for walkability and Shimano M424 pedals because they are double entry and have cages, so you can ride in street shoes if you want to.
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Old 01-14-06, 04:16 PM   #13
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I use SPD pedals for my road bike. Like yourself I just started riding recently after a long layoff and started using the clipless pedals from the get go. I only used the platform pedals in the past. When you first start out adjust the pedals to a loose setting where your shoes almost come out too easily. After you get used to it some make them slightly tighter. Keep doing this until you feel comfortable. When I first started I kept the alen wrentch in my pocket rode a mile or so practicing taking my feet in and out. Then stopped making a small adjustment. Kept doing this for a while until I was comfortable.
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Old 01-14-06, 05:10 PM   #14
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Thanks for all the great suggestions for my new bike. Actually, I'm not a "total" newbie. I have been riding a Treck hybrid for about a year and it has the cheapo flat pedals. I think the idea of getting MTB shoes and clipless pedals will work great for me. I'll check Nashbar and other sources. My LBS did say that they will give me a discount on accessories since I am buying the bike from them so.....I'll check with them also.
Thanks again.
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Old 01-14-06, 05:41 PM   #15
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Ths Shimano clipless mtn bike should be in the neighborhood of $55.
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Old 01-14-06, 05:45 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEgan712
...I think I need to get "clipless pedals" Is that correct?...
no, No, nO, NO, NO!!! You don't need to get clipless pedals. You can get a variety of pedals. Most racers choose clipless. Most commuters choose platforms. Most vintage riders choose toe clips and straps on platforms. There's a wide range of options available. Check them ALL out before you decide.
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Old 01-14-06, 06:00 PM   #17
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I started off with Look clipless pedals, but I switched to Speedplay Zeros. The advantage is that you can clip in from either side; I never got use to not looking down to clip in (sort of dangerous going across an intersection).

If you do go clipless, I would advise to practice unclipping a lot leaning against a wall. Otherwise, you'll fall over at the first intersection - very embarrassing.
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Old 01-14-06, 06:10 PM   #18
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I like the "transition idea" if new to road cyling. First platforms, then platforms with clips 'n' straps to accustom yourself to having your foot "attached"....and then the decision to go on to clipless (and what variety).

Once you have platforms, adding clips and straps is cheap enough and easy. If looking for a clip/strap source....Rivendell Bicycles online catalog site is one possibility. Some riders have clips but don't feel the need for straps; others just strap loosely and some riders really tighten themselves on.
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Old 01-14-06, 06:14 PM   #19
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- my experience went like this:

1. started out on platform to get used to feel of bike
2. ditched platform, added 'half toeclips'
3. ditched toeclips, went with 'campus type' (one side SPD, other platform)
3. went w/SPD using Sixsixone shoes for my 'knobbly bikes' and Specialized road shoes for my road bikes
4. ditched SPD and changed all over to eggbeaters

- the eggbeater cleats fit my 661s and Specialized shoes, and also seem 'shallower' on the shoes; i.e., no pavement scraping

- i'm happy now - and the journey was fun - great to experiment with different setups!

p.s. is clipless necessary? nope!
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Old 01-14-06, 07:19 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrannyGear
I like the "transition idea" if new to road cyling. First platforms, then platforms with clips 'n' straps to accustom yourself to having your foot "attached"....and then the decision to go on to clipless (and what variety).

Once you have platforms, adding clips and straps is cheap enough and easy. If looking for a clip/strap source....Rivendell Bicycles online catalog site is one possibility. Some riders have clips but don't feel the need for straps; others just strap loosely and some riders really tighten themselves on.
I used the same approach with my GF and her son, except instead of clips-n-straps I used Power Grips. Power grips are easier to get in and out of than clips with straps, and the motion is similar to that of clipless pedals.
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