Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    just over the next hill cruzMOKS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas City MO
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Volpe 2006 Fuji Tahoe
    Posts
    543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My daughter and I decided to ride this afternoon. She surprised me because it was not pretty day. It was about 40 degrees F and drab gray. On the way home I ran across this Raleigh Grand Prix 10 speed. The owner was out in the yard picking up leaves. As I was looking at it he said I could have the bike. I told him I would be back in an hour with my car to get it.

    It has some rust the wheels seem to turn OK the pedals may be rusted. The rear brake is rusted. It may be a project for me.

    Last edited by cruzMOKS; 01-17-06 at 04:12 PM.

  2. #2
    sch
    sch is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Birmingham. AL
    Posts
    2,589
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Realize that ALL the plastic rubber parts will need to be replaced: tires/maybe tubes, brake pads, housings, rubber parts on the brake levers and the cables as well. I hope the rims aren't rusting, indicating steel rims as that goes too. Then you need to totally tear down the bike to the tiniest parts, take the brakes apart and hopefully you can still remove the freewheel and clean and lube it as well. All the bearing surfaces, balls, and the inside of the bike tubing need close exam for rust. You can then decide what else needs replacing. It may clean up nicely and be usable lubed and reassembled. A patina of rust can be removed with an abrasive pad and WD40. Pitted surfaces need to be cleaned more thoroughly if on the frame or replaced if bearing surfaces. A google on electrolytic rust removal shows a simple method of rehabing rusted parts. It works. Passivating the cleaned surface with phosphating agents is a good idea prior to repaint if it goes that far. Is the bike close to the right size for you?
    Steve

  3. #3
    bici accumulatori pinerider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    My Bikes
    1982 Steve Bauer road bike, 1985 Custom Campy road bike, 1985 Nishiki International Touring Bike, 1992 Norco Bigfoot MTB, 1975 Raleigh Twenty folder, 1992 Vitus 979 road bike, 1996 Bianchi Premio road bike, 2002 Thin Blue LIne CO2 mountain bike,
    Posts
    853
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The pic didn't work, cruz, all I can see is a little red x.
    SCH has some good advice, but it doesn't have to be that difficult. I run a recycle bikes from the landfill site project, a lot of the bikes we get have sat somewhere for 15 years or so and operate with no problems. I have about 5 of my own and have put over 4000 km on them without disassembling and greasing. A test ride will usually tell if everything is going to work, and then a little adjustment of cones and bearings is usually all that's required. If things start making noises or get stiff, then you'll want to disassemble and grease right away.
    A test ride should also resolve sizing issues
    ...!

  4. #4
    just over the next hill cruzMOKS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas City MO
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Volpe 2006 Fuji Tahoe
    Posts
    543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I will need to put my photos in a different place, maybe photo bucket.

    I will look at it closer tonight. The chain is rusted bad.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,591
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The question is: Do you have a use for the bike?

    If your plan is to fix it up to sell, I'd say "forgetaboutit". Old road bikes are about a dime a dozen and you'll never make back what it will cost to fix it up.

    If you have a personal use for the bike, that's different. You'll probably have as much fun rebuilding and restoreing it as you will riding it.

    If I was the one to find such a bike, I would have already started looking for a fixed gear hub.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern Nevada
    Posts
    3,728
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm w/Pinerider. Sch is right, technically, but it doesn't have to be a big or expensive deal. Parts are pretty cheap, and the thing doesn't have to be perfect to be rideable.
    My singlespeed is an old Trek touring bike that sat in a neighbor's back yard for at least 10 years. He tossed it into a dumpster and I pulled it out and rebuilt it on a Saturday, removing all but the middle chainring and spinning on a BMX freewheel ($13) in place of the old five-cog one. I had some decent tires and spare tubes around, and I used the old brake cable housings with new cables (five or six bucks). Aftermarket brake pads were about $10, but I think the old ones could have been reused if I sanded them down a bit. I replaced the bearings (loose balls, bought in bulk from Nashbar for $2.90/100) and lubed everything with grease and oil I had in the shop anyway. The whole job took a morning and probably cost $25, and I've ridden it that way for three or four years.

  7. #7
    just over the next hill cruzMOKS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas City MO
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Volpe 2006 Fuji Tahoe
    Posts
    543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After looking at it agian tonight the derailer is rusted bad. I will try to work it loose.

    I reposted the picture on photobucket

    I saw another bike laying on the ground maybe I could use some of those parts.
    I didn't get it because it might of been a stolen bike, ditched.
    It didn't look like it was rideable but I will pass on these situations.

    The bike would be for me or my son.

    Last edited by cruzMOKS; 01-17-06 at 04:23 PM.

  8. #8
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
    My Bikes
    1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
    Posts
    14,642
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Old road bikes are no longer a dime a dozen, and they are arguably still some of the most practical, enjoyable all-round performers out there. My Peugeot UO-8 is a surprisingly nimble commuter, despite its "gas pipe" plain gauge carbon steel frame. Read SheldonBrown.com on a few of the advantages of older bikes over newer ones.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  9. #9
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,591
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by John E
    Old road bikes are no longer a dime a dozen,
    Are you buying or selling? It looks to me like the OP got that bike for it's exact fair market value.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •