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  1. #1
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    Did I make a mistake?

    In my test rides, I didn't pay attention to shifting. I bought the Breezer Liberty. And, I really like it. BUT, I'm not crazy about the shifting, particularly shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. It's hard to shift, I have to push IN too far, for too long. I mean, not extremely long or anything like that, I just don't like the effort involved in shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. I really don't like it. Any ways around it/fixes?

  2. #2
    OM boy cyclezen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tivoli1
    In my test rides, I didn't pay attention to shifting. I bought the Breezer Liberty. And, I really like it. BUT, I'm not crazy about the shifting, particularly shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. It's hard to shift, I have to push IN too far, for too long. I mean, not extremely long or anything like that, I just don't like the effort involved in shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. I really don't like it. Any ways around it/fixes?
    hard to know what you're goin thru with this.

    I would suggest riding a week or so (just noticed from other thread that this bike is brandy new to you...) and accumulating as many ???? as you can; then go back to the place you bought the bike and go thru the laundrylist with them. A good LBS will be very happy to clear up questions, give riding/operation tips, make approriate adjustments and send you home happier.

  3. #3
    sdr
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    Misanthropic Miscreant sdr's Avatar
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    you're making a ten tooth jump - 32 to 42 - and it generally requires one revolution of the crank in order to fully allow that transition - unlike the rapid response that you should experience via the trigger shifting on the rear derailleur where each jump is considerably less.

    ride the bike for a month and then have your LBS adjust the cables and point out any areas of concern. your bike has Xcellent shifters and derailleurs so i'm guessing that some minor tweaking will resolve the problem or significantly reduce the effort.

    you have a really nice bike! second thoughts i 'spose are always part of any bike purchase. ride and enjoy!

    *sdr*
    “You must be the change that you wish to see in the world” Gandhi

  4. #4
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Although they may not realise it, When an experienced rider changes gear- they take the pressure off the pedals just a bit. This helps the gears to nicely "Derail " to the next cog. If you keep hard pressure in, then the chain tries to hold onto the gear its in, and does make it difficult- or even impossible. I take it you want the high gear as you are going faster? Would not mind betting that you are keeping the pressure on the pedals, and this may be the problem. To see if it is, be in middle ring on a slight downslope. Keep turning the pedals but take the pressure off, and change gear. If it is easier and changes quickly, then you have yet another skill to learn. If not- get back to the shop to adjust the cables.

    Don't worry about these new skills- most are overcome naturally, and the others will come. Any other problems then keep asking us to cure it.
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    Everybody else has said just what I would--it's a relatively big shift, and it takes a full revolution for the chain to climb up there. Things may loosen a bit with time, or you may get used to it.
    One suggestion I might add is to check, or have the shop check, the cable tension and limit screw setting on the front derailleur. It's a very simple adjustment, and they should do it free as part of a checkup after a month or so of use (at least the shops around here do. I don't know if it's universal).

  6. #6
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    I should pay you for this advice, it's so good and reassuring (now don't get any ideas!)

    As a side note, I'm beginning to see results by riding. I have a slightly higher energy level (well, more than slightly), I'm looking better and feeling better. All around, this is a GOOD thing. I'm still going out only about 30 minutes every day, remember I was in zero shape, so I'm working in easy, but I'm seeing that certain (small) hills (ok, inclines) are becoming easier and my pace is getting a little faster in general. It's been about two weeks now, and I think I missed 3 or 4 days riding, but those days I was in the city and walked a lot. I'm afraid to push myself TOO much too fast, so I'll go at this pace (brisk enough) maybe another week or so and then maybe go for 45 minutes.

    I'm just riding in and around suburban streets, the same ones every day. My general neighborhood is surrounded by 3 good sized hills, so I'm not venturing down the hills right now, maybe in a couple of weeks when I've gained more strength and endurance. With all the rocks and twigs and small branches and stuff on the road, it's good to have these tires. I'm feeling so great overall. I think I finally realized that exercise does not have to kill you to be helpful, pacing oneself is a good thing too, with a small increase in steps.

    Excellent info, thanks.

  7. #7
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tivoli1
    I should pay you for this advice, it's so good and reassuring (now don't get any ideas!)


    I'm just riding in and around suburban streets, the same ones every day. My general neighborhood is surrounded by 3 good sized hills, so I'm not venturing down the hills right now, maybe in a couple of weeks when I've gained more strength and endurance. With all the rocks and twigs and small branches and stuff on the road, it's good to have these tires. I'm feeling so great overall. I think I finally realized that exercise does not have to kill you to be helpful, pacing oneself is a good thing too, with a small increase in steps.

    Excellent info, thanks.

    You will pay for the advice by sorting out the good pie shops for us, and taking the piccies so we can visit it when in the area.

    Those hills. I have a bit of good advice that I still use on the drastic hills. When you first tackle one- take it steady. Do not rush at it. When it gets tough, change down, getting tougher, change down again, and again and again. When you have no gears left and it is still tough--- Slow down. That way you will take the longest steepest hill you have in your area. Only thing is- if you tackle it late in the day- Take lights with you, just in case it is steeper and longer than you thought, Or you get so invigorated by taking the big hill first time out, that you then decide to do another 20 miles just to prove it was not a fluke.
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  8. #8
    370H-SSV-0773H linux_author's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tivoli1
    As a side note, I'm beginning to see results by riding. I have a slightly higher energy level (well, more than slightly), I'm looking better and feeling better. All around, this is a GOOD thing. I'm still going out only about 30 minutes every day, remember I was in zero shape, so I'm working in easy, but I'm seeing that certain (small) hills (ok, inclines) are becoming easier and my pace is getting a little faster in general. It's been about two weeks now, and I think I missed 3 or 4 days riding, but those days I was in the city and walked a lot. I'm afraid to push myself TOO much too fast, so I'll go at this pace (brisk enough) maybe another week or so and then maybe go for 45 minutes.
    - keep up the good work and continue riding - but don't forget to take a rest day (relaxed ride, walk a couple miles, weight training, etc.)

    - you're going to up your ride time in no time at all, trust me... i know exactly what you're going through... it took me a while, but now i feel 'good/right' after riding at least 90 minutes - time is more important than mileage for me (but racking up miles is good too)

    - nice ride, btw - i looked at your model and seriously considered it!

  9. #9
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    Stapfam's post is spot-on (everyone else's is, too, for that matter). When changing gears, keep pedaling, but at reduced force. You may find it helpful to delay upshifts, i.e., stay in the middle gear to the point that you are spinning a bit too fast for comfort, then change up.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  10. #10
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    I'll definitely keep those concepts in mind, had no idea of them before.

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    Well, the bike stopped this morning again. Only, this time I couldn't get it moving again. I was sailing down an incline into a cul de sac, where I turned around and began going uphill again. That's when I started changing the shifting and I don't even know what happened. It just stopped going. My husband's good with bikes, so when he comes home, he'll fix it, I'm sure. Boy, I could do anything with my Trek 730, never had that problem. I was going slow at the time, as I didn't anticipate the new hill/incline very well. Walked the bike home.

  12. #12
    sdr
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    huh?

    is your chain really drooping - hanging?

    shifting on a bicycle requires a certain order or progression, either ascending or descending on the chain-rings, accompanied by steadily pedaling through the shift. sometimes random shifting that does not follow that progression, or not pedaling while shifting, will result in a thrown chain.

    given the caliber of components on this bike i would suggest that the problem may be due to operator error?

    bottom line - i think you must have thrown the chain?

    *sdr*
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  13. #13
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    It sounds like a technique problem to me, Tivoli1. You can get the chain jammed if you try to shift under too much load or at too low rpms. With a little fiddling, you can usually unjam it too - just put the shifters in their former positions and backpedal. Keep working on it! If you don't get used to the shifters on the bike, you can always change the shifters to some Shimano-compatible SRAM ones. Attacks work pretty well, but Rockets would be better. Regardless of which shifter you use, the derailleurs will have the same operating limitations.

    You are using the rear deraillleur for your primary shifting, and the chainrings to select ranges, right?

  14. #14
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    Was that last sentence in English, lol? If I could venture to guess what you mean, lol, I'd guess that the rear derailleur is the high gear and the chain rings are the low gears (you may laugh now). So, the answer to that question, if I'm guessing right, is....I don't know, actually, if I shifted from the high to the middle gear as I started up the hill or just went about changing the individual gears. I would assume I wanted to change from the big high gear to the big middle gear, but maybe I was also dancing around with the individual gears too here and there when one thing didn't do anything.

    I didn't take a good look, really, but I didn't observe the chain dropping. ok, let me take a look..........chain is definitely not drooping.

    I can't believe I have to be so aware of the manner in which I shift. Never had that problem and in the old days with my Trek 730, we did a lot of bike riding on the bike paths in Cape Cod with the kids. All over the place. Now all of a sudden I have to be aware of a certain order of progression? Hmmmmmm......

  15. #15
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    Most riders leave the chain in the middle chainring and run up and down the gears in back as necessary. That's because the rear shifter shifts more quickly than the front one, and for most instances the middle ring has more than enough range. You only need the smallest/largest rings if you need more gears in one direction or the other. Thus my question: is that what you are doing? If I'm reading your posts correctly, you're having troubles shifting the chainrings. The responses I'm hearing are that either something is misadjusted or you're doing something wrong. As long as you're not standing on the pedals or backpedaling while shifting, you should be OK wrt technique; so if you're still having problems maybe it's time to visit the shop.

  16. #16
    Elite Fred mollusk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals
    You are using the rear deraillleur for your primary shifting, and the chainrings to select ranges, right?
    There are some of us that have been riding long enough to remember (or even still have!) half-step gearing on a bike. I have it on an old Cannondale touring bike. In that type of gearing you make your fine adjustments on the front and your bigger steps on the back. On my old C'dale the chain rings are 50 and 45 teeth each. I don't expect that is an issue with this rider's bike, however.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tivoli1
    In my test rides, I didn't pay attention to shifting. I bought the Breezer Liberty. And, I really like it. BUT, I'm not crazy about the shifting, particularly shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. It's hard to shift, I have to push IN too far, for too long. I mean, not extremely long or anything like that, I just don't like the effort involved in shifting from the middle gear to the high gear. I really don't like it. Any ways around it/fixes?
    Tivoli:

    I may be wrong here, but after reading your post and the responses, it may be that everyone got the impression you were talking about shifting to a larger chainring (the gears between the pedals, which you would use the front derailleur for), when in fact you were talking about shifting to a larger gear in the back (on the freewheel, which is the gears on the back wheel, which you would use the rear derailleur for).

    If that is the case, it may just be that the rear derailleur needs adjustment. Maybe the rear derailleur cable has already stretched (they will do that when new), or maybe the rear derailleur was never properly adjusted. Also, if that is the case, everyone was thinking you would be spinning fast and that you wanted to shift to the larger chainwheel in the front, when in fact you were wanting to pedal easier (maybe because of a hill) and you were shifting to a larger gear in the rear (on the freewheel).

  18. #18
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    Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it, and I understand I didn't provide much information, nor do I have much now. I was trying to shift into a lower gear at the time to move more easily up the hill. My husband quickly fixed the problem. He's really good with bikes. I don't remember what the problem was, maybe the chain was off in the back, he said? He told me how to fix it and I don't remember, but I think he said just to put the chain back on and move the pedals? I don't know. I'll have to ask again! It almost happened again when I took him on my course to show him where I go. He was impressed with the workout! He came back sweating and he's a runner! Who knows, maybe he dressed too warm, haha. Spent the weekend in the city, so walked my legs off and today it's raining so I'll be back in the saddle tomorrow and I'll reread this information above. I STILL don't get why I'm having this trouble when I never had trouble with my Trek 730. But, maybe it needs an adjustment. That could be. And, maybe I do too!

  19. #19
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    The breezer liberty is a high quality bike. The rear derailluers are Shimano Deore XT. They are bullet proof when it comes to durability, and reliability. Many long distance touring bikes come equipped with Deore XT. Your bike is equipped with a Deore front derailleur which is another proven component.

    It's possible that your derailleurs are defective, but a more likely explanation of what's happening is misadjustment or inexperience. The way I read one of your posts is that you were going up hill as you were shifting? Noting that your old Trek 730 was the exception, shifters don't work well under extreme pressure, such as is put on when mashing the pedals hard going up hill. Try backing off the pressure when shifting. This can be done when pedaling up hill.

    Give it some time and experiment with some different shifting techniques(less pressure, shift before you reach the upgrade). If the problem doesn't go away, it's time to go back to the bike shop and discuss it with them. My guess is that with more experience things will smooth out. Good luck with your riding. You've chosen a great bike. Riding in winter on Long Island, my bike helmet's off to you!
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