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Old 01-20-06, 01:54 PM   #1
chicagoamdream
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New 2006 Rivendell Quickbeam Pics

http://www.rivbike.com/pics/Sites.html

Anyone interested?
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Old 01-20-06, 02:37 PM   #2
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Very nice. I like that color orange slightly more than the previous green. I'm not sure about the new tweed bags, though. Even if I had the extra cash, I doubt I would invest in a Quickbeam but I'm really glad Riv's making a bike like that.
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Old 01-20-06, 05:48 PM   #3
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Wow, even the website is retro...
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Old 01-20-06, 05:50 PM   #4
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I have an Atlantis and a Rambouillet I really, really like, and Rivendell's been great in every transaction I've ever had with them, but I just can't see myself spending the money for a Quickbeam. I do ride SS--got an old Trek tourer I converted in my garage, and it's fun--but that just seems like too much money for a toy.
Why didn't the Rambouillet seem like too much for a toy when I already had an Atlantis? Jeez, you sound just like my wife....
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Old 01-21-06, 01:02 AM   #5
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For long day-rides and exploring the foothills, I love my Riv. Romulus....stable, comfortable, solid. For more demanding rides with friends--well, demanding for us-- I prefer my old Allez-- a little quicker and stiffer AND twitchier.

And Velo, having compared an Atlantis' ride to my (very similar to Rambouillet) Rom, there are differences enough to have both in your garage.
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Old 01-21-06, 02:03 AM   #6
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From a very windy thread on the SS/FG forum......

New 2006 Rivendell Quickbeam Pics

D
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Old 01-21-06, 07:07 AM   #7
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Not into road bikes, but this is what a bike should be. Very basic with the parts that work. Always wondered why road bikes don't have "V" brakes, but apparantly they do. That front pannier though. Unless I was on a long tour where I would need the extra carrying capacity- I would never fit a pannier on the front. It affects handling as soon as any real weight goes in it, so the conventional rear rack would have made more sense.

Nice bike overral though.
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Old 01-21-06, 11:09 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stapfam
Not into road bikes, but this is what a bike should be. Very basic with the parts that work. Always wondered why road bikes don't have "V" brakes, but apparantly they do. That front pannier though. Unless I was on a long tour where I would need the extra carrying capacity- I would never fit a pannier on the front. It affects handling as soon as any real weight goes in it, so the conventional rear rack would have made more sense.

Nice bike overral though.
There are neither "V" brakes nor front panniers on that bike.
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Old 01-22-06, 11:41 PM   #9
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Not particularly into road bikes or drops, and I don't know what to call those brakes - but I do know art, and that's it.
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Old 01-23-06, 12:13 AM   #10
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For want of a better term, let's call the brakes "cantilevers". Seriously, this bike fills a utilitarian niche that the carbon/titanium/outa-my-way-sucker crowd has no use for, but real people do. Too bad the price of this sweetly crafted bike is relatively high for most people...maybe bikes like Surly present themselves and their talents at a more practical price point.

I sometimes wonder if Rivendell isn't cleverly filling an overlooked part of the market--practical, divergent people with $$ who want to be different. (I use and enjoy many Riv. products-- from beeswax to banana bags to my Romulus.) For sure, though, I wouldn't hit the road with the tailored bike bag in the picture...a bit too LL Bean for me.
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Old 01-23-06, 12:20 AM   #11
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I like the bike, but the bag has got to go. I wonder why they choose to put a front rack braze-on on the this fork when they do not put them on the Atlantis. Go figure.
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Old 01-23-06, 12:30 AM   #12
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I thought the bike was cool. Then I read the whole thread on the Single Speed forum and realize how foolish I was. Clearly, it's a piece of capitalistic junk.

(But I still like it!)
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Old 01-23-06, 06:36 AM   #13
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Just be thankful it isn't called the "FaisceauRapide", given Grant's penchant for using cutesey French names for his bikes.
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Old 01-23-06, 11:24 AM   #14
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Somebody on the Fixed Gear Forum called them "grampa" bikes because of the emphasis on rider comfort. I hate to admit it, but maybe thats why Rivendell's bikes appeal to me.
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Old 01-23-06, 11:35 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtdrop
Somebody on the Fixed Gear Forum called them "grampa" bikes because of the emphasis on rider comfort. I hate to admit it, but maybe thats why Rivendell's bikes appeal to me.
I can't imagine thinking of a one or two speed bike as comfortable. What's comfortable is being able to shift into a lower gear when that hill looms.
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Old 01-23-06, 02:21 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olebiker
I can't imagine thinking of a one or two speed bike as comfortable. What's comfortable is being able to shift into a lower gear when that hill looms.
What's a "hill?"
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Old 01-23-06, 07:15 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarHorizon
What's a "hill?"
It rides like a viaduct or overpass but it is usually a lot bigger and can have trees growing on it.... or not. Some of the larger hills will have some snow on the top. It's that stuff that looks like the inside of your freezer.

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