Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am planning on buying my wife a hybrid bike so she can join me on some of my rides. I was curious as to whether most women prefer the traditional female style or ride a mens bike. The wide range of frame sizes in the men's are more likely to provide a good fit as opposed to the only two sizes in the women's model, but I don't know how much difference it makes regarding the women's preference. My wife has ridden in years and is fit for a 50+ person, but she still is a 50+ person. Suggestions?
    Last edited by foxden; 02-06-06 at 07:24 AM. Reason: typo

  2. #2
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by foxden
    I am planning on buying my wife a hybrid bike so she can join me on some of my rides. I was curious as to whether most women prefer the traditional female style or ride a mens bike. The wide range of frame sizes in the men's are more likely to provide a good fit as opposed to the only two sizes in the women's model, but I don't know how much difference it makes regarding the women's preference. My wife has ridden in years and is fit for a 50+ person, but she still is a 50+ person. Suggestions?
    Don't get hung up on the womens frame. They are built differently, but that is to accomodate the shorter torso length and longer legs that is different to male frames. My wife tried both and finished up with a male frame in a size to suit her body length, and then raised the saddle to suit. Longer seat post was swopped at the shop and the Handlebar stem to give her a higher bar position. That was 12 years ago and the bike still fits, is still a good bike and is even suitable as a spare for me when I forget to service my bike.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Taos, NM
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Are you talking about a nixte frame?
    Not to be confused with a Women Specific Design (WSD) frame?

    I think the nixte frames were originally designed to accommodate skirts, if your wife is riding in shorts no need for a nixte.

    The WSD is a way to draw more women into the sport by telling us the manufactures are thinking about you and your money. I think Stapfam explained that you have more options going with a traditional frame and getting it fit properly. Fit is the key, if the bike fits you are going to ride it more.

    Personally, for me a traditional design is the way to go.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am talking about a ladies step through design vs. the typical hybrid (slanting crossbar).
    I wonder about the ease of getting on and off. I certainly don't imagine she'd be riding wearing a skirt or dress.

  5. #5
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by foxden
    I am talking about a ladies step through design vs. the typical hybrid (slanting crossbar).
    I wonder about the ease of getting on and off. I certainly don't imagine she'd be riding wearing a skirt or dress.
    As mentioned by Taos women- Fit is the important thing. Getting off a male bike is not a problem with trousers or shorts. That fit is only to be felt by trying different bikes. There will literraly be one bike that your wife will sit on and that is the one to investigate.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  6. #6
    Pat
    Pat is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    My Bikes
    litespeed, cannondale
    Posts
    2,795
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have heard that the WSD (women's specific design) frames are only really needed by short women (around 5'2" or shorter). Taller women can be fit into normal bikes (men's bikes) by adjusting the seat post and swapping out the handlebar stem to bring the handlebars back closer to the saddle.

    I would avoid the mixte frames or step through frames. Who is going to ride a bike in skirts these days? Also the mixte frame is heavier than the diamond frame. I would also think that economies of scale (much larger production) of men's frames would make a comparable men's frame much cheaper than a mixte frame.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Thrifty1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    780
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    FWIW....my 58 year old wife loves her Giant Cypress women's "step through" frame. She prefers the step through mounting/dismounting when her large trunk bag is mounted on the rear rack.
    BCNU
    Gary

  8. #8
    Senior Member lookinUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    My Bikes
    Trek 520 and Trek Madone 5.2
    Posts
    403
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why don't you let your wife choose what SHE WANTS? It's nice that you want to buy her a bike, but, it has to fit her and be something she will ride. Both of you go to several bike shops and have her try several different styles. Age has nothing to do with it - I have a 74 year old woman friend who just bought a Trek 1000 road bike. I'm a 65 year old woman with an Orbea Onix road bike. Bike type preference and fit should be up to your wife.

    End of rant...

    Trek Madone 5.2 wsd

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am not a controlling husband, but if I leave it totally to her she'd pick the cheapest one available. I have decided to involve her and get her to the shop and see what fits her best, etc.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Many women have longer legs and shorter torso and arms than an average male of identical height. As a result, some bike companies design hybrid bikes for women that bring the bars back an inch or two closer to the saddle, compared with a men's model for a man of that same height.

    Many female riders find it more comfortable to ride with their pelvis upright, with their weight on their "sit bones", compared with riding with the pelvis tipped forward, which puts painful pressure on areas not designed to support weight. Having the bars as high as the saddle (or higher) allows riding with the pelvis more upright. Don't buy a bike that has the bars lower than the saddle unless the bars can be raised.

    A first rate bike shop has staff who know how to fit a bike. After your wife visits two or three shops, and tries out a couple of bikes, she will know which bike feels most comfortable.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Long Island
    My Bikes
    Trek 730
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm a 50+ gal and just got back into biking a little more than a month ago. I'm overweight and out of shape and just bought my bike nearly a month ago. I had the same question. Not being in shape, I groaned at the thought of a man's frame and the pain (figuratively) getting on and off. I quickly decided not to be concerned with that feature of a bike, that there were other more important features (to me) that I wanted to be concerned with. In the end, I bought the Breezer Liberty, which has a slightly lower cross bar thing, which doesn't really make a difference in terms of ease. I have learned to lean the bike down somewhat which is much easier for me to get on the bike.

    I bought the Liberty because of the lower than normal gearing, which enables me to stay on the bike as opposed to walking. I also love the handlebars of the Liberty, which gives me multiple positions for my hands. Like that flexibility. It's a very solid, smooth, very smooth, ride, with great tires too. I didn't like the hand position on a hybrid or the drops on a road bike, although I wouldn't have to use the drops, but the shifting is mostly near the drops so that was awkward for me (but that could also have been moved up, which was then kind of in the way). So, the Breezer handle bars and shifting placement was great.

    From my research, I've been told that the WSD is geared toward petite women. I would never let a cross through model drive the bike features for me. Like I said, I'm not in shape, far from it, but there are more important features to look at than that feature, unless there's another reason she needs that feature.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NW Ohio
    My Bikes
    1984 Miyata 310, 1989 Club Fuji, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem
    Posts
    1,177
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your wife's attitude toward biking could make a difference as to what she will accept. My wife doesn't like to ride very much, so by making everything as easy as possible, she will at least ride occasionally. She has a ladie's step-through frame, SIS shifting, an upright stem and handlebars, and a big fat gel seat. She also likes to be able to put her feet down when she stops, so the frame is pretty small. It may not fit the way the bike shop recommends, but she likes it and that's what's important.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
    Posts
    9,087
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My wife's first adult bike was a Trek hybrid, it lasted two weeks. She was peddling hard trying to keep up with my easy coasting speed. The dealer gave us a full refund toward a road bike. Now she's on her 4th bike, a Trek WSD 5200. A grandmother, age 62, she will ride with me up to 65 miles. Haven't been able to talk her into doing the Hotter'n Hell Hundred century with me, yet.

    Al

  14. #14
    Senior Member Dchiefransom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Newark, CA. San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    6,191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Any guy that's ever bounced off his seat and hit the top tube can tell you that a step through frame is REALLY a guy's bike !!!
    Silver Eagle Pilot

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the advice, I can bring closure to this thread. I took her to shop and she choose a step through Raleigh Passage 5.0 It has all the bells and whistles any hybrid could have, including disc brakes. I think the comfort provided by the seat and front shocks ought to help her gain confidence riding with me. She is excited about it so now we will do a few paved trails (traffic intimidates her) and see how that goes.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Deanster04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    My Bikes
    Cinelli Supercoursa 69, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Mondonico Diamond Extra 05, Coors Light Greg Lemond (built by Scapin) 88, Scapin MTB, Stumpjumper 83, Specialized Stumpjumper M4, Lemond Poprad 2001
    Posts
    1,366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah! If you are serious about getting her something good to ride then take her to a place that will properly fit her to a frame, introduce her to the sales person, then get the hell out of the way. She will not be able to blame you for any pain or soreness that will come with all new riders.
    Driving a car, folding sails, or decorating your home are all activities that I presume that you would naturally stay away from, but cycling is in the same class. Let her make the decision and not feel overwhelmed by your superior bikeological intellect...

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Taos, NM
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanster04
    She will not be able to blame you for any pain or soreness that will come with all new riders.
    ...

    Where does it say that in the owner's manual?

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
    Posts
    9,087
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TaosWoman
    Where does it say that in the owner's manual?
    LOL

  19. #19
    Senior Member Deanster04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    My Bikes
    Cinelli Supercoursa 69, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Mondonico Diamond Extra 05, Coors Light Greg Lemond (built by Scapin) 88, Scapin MTB, Stumpjumper 83, Specialized Stumpjumper M4, Lemond Poprad 2001
    Posts
    1,366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TaosWoman
    Where does it say that in the owner's manual?
    Well it doesn't does it! It just prevents the guilt on the guy's side...unless you were brought up Catholic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •