Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 40
  1. #1
    Rid'n Rev sour01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Daphne, AL
    My Bikes
    2007 Felt F55, Vintage Univega
    Posts
    106
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Titanium vs Carbon

    I am going to eventually upgrade to a more modern bike---probably before this year is over. I have an 80's Univega Gran Premio with a steel frame and downtube shifters. It is a good bike and I have enjoyed it a lot---but want to experience some of the newer technology. I have watched DG's struggle with great interest. What are some of your thoughts about titanium frames vs carbon frames. Seems like titanium would stand up a bit longer than carbon in a fall or other type accident. If carbon breaks you are looking for a new bike. Is titanium too expensive?

    Any thoughts or experience?

  2. #2
    sch
    sch is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Birmingham. AL
    Posts
    2,604
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not much difference between the two in cost. Both are horrendously expensive but since there is only 2-2.5# of material in the frame material costs could triple without doing much to frame pricing which has more to do with manufacturing costs and R&D and what the market will bear. Judging from the trends, carbon is definitely on the upswing as a frame material. Carbon frames are very tough but their impact resistance, though large aint nothing like Ti which is the closest thing to a lifetime frame among present materials. Of course Ti will dent where carbon cracks but hits heavy enough to destroy a frame are likely to be pretty damaging on your 50+ bod as well so I would not be too concerned over frame material.
    You realize that you are in the $2500 and up (way up) range with these materials for new bikes. No one really knows what the life span of a carbon frame is because the manufacturing technology is continually changing and definitely improving so any statement to that is opinion. The rate of technology transfer from aerospace to bike making is fairly high and planes are a lot more hostile environment than you will ever be on your carbon steed.
    Steve

  3. #3
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was in much the same situation as you a few years ago. Here are my two cents:

    Test ride a lot of bikes. You may be surprised that two highly regarded bikes made from the same material will have significantly different rides.

    Get a good fit. A good-fitting "crappy" frame is far better than a poor fitting "great" frame. But it's best to hold out for a good fitting "great" frame.

    Check the warranties. Most of the top marques will replace a carbon frame if it fails. Others will have a lot more to say than I on this subject, since I don't own a carbon bike, but it seems like they're pretty reliable these days.

    Shop for a good deal. I ended up buying a left-over 2003 LeMond titanium bike right before the 2004 season. I paid less than 2K. Since I wasn't in a hurry I just kept looking and looking and looking. Think of it like dating before you make a commitment.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    My Bikes
    Bianchi San Remo - set up as a utility bike, Peter Mooney Road bike, Peter Mooney commute bike,Dahon Folder,Schwinn Paramount Tandem
    Posts
    1,828
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nothing wrong with steel.
    The most recent bike that I bought is built on a steel frame, it is as light as most anything out there (custom lugged steel frame built from a Deddacai Zero tubeset) - rides better and should outlast me. As I get older, comfort becomes more and more important, I have never found something as comfortable as steel.

    FWIW, the bike weighs in at a bit over 17lbs.

  5. #5
    Senior Member CrossChain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sauerwald
    Nothing wrong with steel.
    The most recent bike that I bought is built on a steel frame, it is as light as most anything out there (custom lugged steel frame built from a Deddacai Zero tubeset) - rides better and should outlast me. As I get older, comfort becomes more and more important, I have never found something as comfortable as steel.

    FWIW, the bike weighs in at a bit over 17lbs.
    Make? Builder?
    Riding and aging don't get easier, you just get slower at slowing down.] (FiftyPlus observation inspired by G. Lemond.)

  6. #6
    Banned. Gary Diego's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    In The Moment
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    Since I wasn't in a hurry I just kept looking and looking and looking. Think of it like dating before you make a commitment.
    What, you mean buy a bike after five minutes???

  7. #7
    Senior Member CrossChain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Damn, Paulie, most of my life decisions are made in about 5 minutes.......but it takes me arduous time to pick out a pair of tires. Ah, the humanity of it!
    Riding and aging don't get easier, you just get slower at slowing down.] (FiftyPlus observation inspired by G. Lemond.)

  8. #8
    OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach stonecrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Weston, FL
    My Bikes
    Ridley Noah RS, Scott CR1 Pro
    Posts
    2,169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think you need to ride both and see which YOU like. I have a friend who had a CF Kestrel for years and loved it. He decided to get a new bike, got rid of the Kestrel and got a great deal on a Litespeed. He likes the Litespeed but if he had to do it over again he would go back to CF. I know people who are just the opposite as well. You really have to figure out what works best for you, any bike in those price ranges is going to be a good bike.
    The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

    2013 Noah RS

  9. #9
    Senior Member gear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    North shore of Mass.
    Posts
    2,131
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I suggest you go to Seven cycles and have a custom frame made just for you. You can get a ti frame, a steel frame or a frame with a mix of carbon and ti. Anyway you go for material, you'll find that the custom fit is the best move. There's nothing like a bike that fits perfectly.

  10. #10
    Senior Member NOS88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    6,452
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ride full carbon, however, I'm saving for a ti bike too... not because I think it will be better. It will be different. The first titanium bikes I rode were not stiff enough for me. Anytime I stood to climb or sprint the chain would just rub up front with a grinding noise that drove me nuts. However, lately the titanium builders have done a much better job with getting the right tubes in the right place to get rid of the sloppy flex. I figure it will take just shy of two years of cutting back on lunches out and the savings I'm hoping to garner from only drinking water (no more of the carbonation in any drinks for me) before I can have both carbon and ti. So maybe the post shouldn't be titanium vs. carbon. Maybe it should be titanium and carbon. Of course, you'll still have to determine which to get first.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
    Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831

  11. #11
    Pat
    Pat is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    My Bikes
    litespeed, cannondale
    Posts
    2,795
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe that the bicycle business is pretty competitive. If you go to a bike shop, I think any bike you see with 105, ultegra or dura ace will be a good bike. Now some bikes have kind of plain vanilla frames to get the components and others go the other way. Even so, I think the frame gives more of a "feel" to the ride and not a whole bunch else.

    I have put quite a few miles on aluminum and now a titanium frame. Both work fine. I have never ridden a CF frame. But I know plenty of people who do who really like them. But there are some people who like chocolate and others who like strawberry or vanilla or pralines and cream (in ice creams of course). I think something like ride "feel" is like ice cream flavors, pretty much a matter of personal taste. I would suggest that you go and ride some CF and titanium frames and see which you like better.

  12. #12
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sour01
    What are some of your thoughts about titanium frames vs carbon frames. Seems like titanium would stand up a bit longer than carbon in a fall or other type accident. If carbon breaks you are looking for a new bike. Is titanium too expensive?

    Any thoughts or experience?
    Ok, just lost reply, trying again.

    If you can afford it, get TI. It's a wonderful ride, smooth and body friendly. CF is almost as friendly but doesn't stand up to hard shocks, i.e. hard pot holes, curb jumping, etc. You might get a new CF bike if it fails, but it depends on manufacturer warranty. Best Ti bikes are: Guru, Lightspeed and Quintana Roo.
    Seven isn't bad, but it's not as aero as Lightspeed or Guru. Both Lightspeed and Guru make custom bikes for you.

    If you're above 215+ lbs, it's either Guru beefed up CF frame or a Ti frame. Ti will cost about $1,400 more than CF. The problem with higher weights is lateral stability tends to be a problem. I really want an Ti and was looking for a CF, i.e. cheaper alternative. The problem is only one CF will work for me. Steel is too heavy. Al is too harsh.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  13. #13
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Forgot to mention, I traded bikes for about 5 miles and rode a Giant TCR, CF frame. I hated it because it had too much side to side flexing. Ride before you decide.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  14. #14
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [QUOTE=Pat] But there are some people who like chocolate and others who like strawberry or vanilla QUOTE]

    Speaking of Vanilla, these look pretty yummy:

    http://www.vanillabicycles.com/
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  15. #15
    OM boy cyclezen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Goleta CA
    My Bikes
    a bunch
    Posts
    3,011
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [QUOTE=Blackberry]
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat
    But there are some people who like chocolate and others who like strawberry or vanilla QUOTE]

    Speaking of Vanilla, these look pretty yummy:

    http://www.vanillabicycles.com/

    REALLY yummie!

    another New Frame? Divorce?
    tough decision

    back to your regularly scheduled pencillead discussion...

  16. #16
    Just shy of 400W ranger5oh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Saint Louis
    My Bikes
    Cannondale System 6, Klein Palomino
    Posts
    765
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Moots is a premier Ti frame builder... check them out.
    2008 Cannondale System Six
    2003 Klein Palomino MTB

    60% of the time, it works everytime.

  17. #17
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ti and Cf are the top of the range materials for bikes- If you are used to Aluminium- then it rides a lot differently and steel can feel a bit firm still.

    Main thing is to Test ride the two materials and in a many different manufacturers as you can. If You want someone to come down on one or the other- Then I would go for Titanium. Reason is that Any form of resin bonded material has a major flaw in that Damage starts from the inside- Where you cannot see it. Any hard knock has to be inspected thoroughly and If any dammage is seen- Or suspected- Then scrap the frame immediately.

    However- Both these materials are the dream of most riders. I know TI is mine. But if after the test ride- Carbon Fibre is your favourite- Then just take a little more care with the bike and Ride it into the ground- In about 20 years I should think.

    Gear has pointed something out- These frames are not going to be cheap= so look at the Custom build to get one that does fit you- As Gear has suggested
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  18. #18
    Senior Curmudgeon
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Directly above the center of the earth
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 1-speed with basket & fenders
    Posts
    3,306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Merlin makes some sweet titanium bikes at the lower end of the "fancy bike" price range. They also do custom work for inexpensive prices.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    rockford, il
    My Bikes
    Trek 7700, C'dale R2000
    Posts
    2,646
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Everybody recommends TEST RIDE. It sounds so simple unless you live in a mid size town which is not focused on road biking. We have a few LBS's but nothing like the bigger towns in bike friendly locations.
    Now what? I need a new bike for another coast to coast credit card tour. Litespeed was the most popular bike on the last tour. Add another few Titanium frame bikes from Roark and others. Seems as if Ti is the choice of these tours, or is it not? There were several full carbon bikes also but from many manufacturers. None dominated.
    My local LBS carry Trek. That is it. My weight is 195 and not much fat (6 ft).
    Any comments?

  20. #20
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    ariZona carbon fiber tandem & single
    Posts
    10,063
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In beaucoup years of riding, have owned steel, alu, ti and currently own a custom c/f.
    All were good/great bikes for their time. Carbon is responsive, light, stiff and above all more comfortable than the metal ones.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think Rivendell makes great "fast touring" road frames. Comfortable, stable, and responsive to pedal input. Not as light as carbon or titanium of course, but a high end group and a good wheelset can put them in the ball park. Plenty of room for wide tires and fenders, if you want to go that way.

  22. #22
    Senior Member CrossChain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I own a Riv Romulus. Steel. It is a great road-eating cruiser for long, paced rides and it tracks like Gary Diego on the scent of cheap perfume. I especially like its descending stability. Damped as much by its geometry as its construction, yet I can draft in our local grupetto w/o anxiety-- although it is no racing bike. Its neither light nor heavy (relative terms), but then people were racing the Tour on bikes of this weight not many years ago...as well as trekking over mountains, etc.

    Still..........I plan on buying some iteration of carbon next season just because.........because I'm curious, beaten down by hype, and have noted all the many recommends here at BF.

    LOL....I would also like to buy a Rans Velocity 'bent which I tried while visiting a friend.

    So many bikes, so little time.
    Riding and aging don't get easier, you just get slower at slowing down.] (FiftyPlus observation inspired by G. Lemond.)

  23. #23
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CrossChain
    I would also like to buy a Rans Velocity 'bent which I tried while visiting a friend.

    So many bikes, so little time.
    I rode a Rans Velocity in Indiana last week. Man, I felt like a whale among minnows.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Raketmensch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    367
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I test rode both CF and Ti frames pretty extensively before deciding what bike to get. I chose CF.

    Both are expensive. Both are lightweight. Both are a tremendous pleasure to ride. You won't go seriously wrong either way.

    For me, the difference was in how they felt when riding over rough roads, gravel, etc. The CF frames, especially the good ones, absorbed those nicely. The Ti frames, in my experience, generally transmitted more high-frequency road vibration to key contact points like saddle and handlebars. I like to do occasionaly long-ish (~100-mile) rides, and I think I'd feel a bit more beat up after one of those on Ti than I do after one of those on carbon. On my current CF frame (Trek Madone SL) I can do a century, and while the legs may be tired and sore, the rest of me feels great.

    I have heard anecdotally that some Ti frames suffer from rather flexy bottom brackets. I never experienced this, but I weigh about 145 pounds, so my experiences may not be representative of what a heavier rider would feel.

  25. #25
    Senior Member CrossChain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    I rode a Rans Velocity in Indiana last week. Man, I felt like a whale among minnows.
    Yes, I can easily see the size thing...especially with that 26" wheel sticking out in front of an already lwb frame. I felt like Casey Jones driving a locomotive. Didn't much care for low speed in traffic, but when I hit some rolling hills in the country that machine really earned the name "velocity". It just flattened those rollers and ate up the road. After adjusting physically to the position and becoming more pedaling efficient, it must be a real gas to ride flats and rolling hills. Steeper climbs would probably feel very slow and awkward, but then on the downhill side..........

    I've ridden recumbents before, and never really felt comfortable sitting down low in traffic. In fact, I felt anxious when passed by trucks. Can't imagine riding a trike as some do.
    Riding and aging don't get easier, you just get slower at slowing down.] (FiftyPlus observation inspired by G. Lemond.)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •