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Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

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Old 08-07-06, 10:08 PM   #1
dauphin
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Sick and tired of this....

Maybe we are just riding more....After the wrestling match of getting the tire back on the rim yesterday...I had two flats today...simultaneously. Got the first one done and got the tire on using something I bought at REI..called a "one stick". The second one I got on and must have damaged the tube. Wife had to come and get me about a mile from home. I CAN CHANGE A TIRE!!!! Enough already! I am seriously tempted to go and buy armadillos or something like that tomorrow...I have changed a ton of flats lately...
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Old 08-07-06, 10:58 PM   #2
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I get flats in bunches. I had three in less than 200 miles, if I don't count the three that I got because the tubes I put in failed, too . . . that's six. I had just switched to Continental Ultra Gators (because my lbs GAVE me two to try). I don't think the flats were the tires fault, at least not 2 of the original three. I ran over a broken beer bottle for one, and had a patch failure for the other. I was averaging a flat every 345 miles (yeah, I keep track), then went 1700 miles without one. I'm at 550 flat-free now.
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Old 08-07-06, 11:41 PM   #3
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It really ended what would have been a tremendous hill climb. I think that really made it worse for me!
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Old 08-08-06, 06:28 AM   #4
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I bought puncture resistant tires for my rear wheels and armadillo strips for the front. Every little bit helps.
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Old 08-08-06, 09:03 AM   #5
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I strongly suspect you have a problem with the rim tape or the valve stem hole....I had the same issue and after I put the cloth Velo rim tape on the rim I have not had a flat in at least a year.....
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Old 08-08-06, 09:06 AM   #6
John E
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As I have aged, my tastes in tires have moved steadily from high performance to high reliability and puncture resistance. I have Schwinn 27x1-3/8" knobbies on my Peugeot UO-8 daily driver, 700Cx28 Specialized Turbos "With Armadillo Technology" on the 1959 Capo, and 700Cx28 Continental Ultra 2000s on the Bianchi.
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Old 08-08-06, 10:43 AM   #7
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+ 1 on the shift to 'high reliability & puncture resistance'

My time is pretty limited as to how long I get to spend riding on any one day so I'm NOT interested in spending that time changing flats...
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Old 08-08-06, 11:38 AM   #8
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700x28 Panaracer Paselas with tour guard. I get a flat maybe once or twice a year. Higher profile tires ride better and are easier to change when I do have a flat. On a 60 mile ride I may finish 5-6 mins later than I would on a 23c tire but I am not as tired.
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Old 08-08-06, 12:17 PM   #9
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Took the bike back to the LBS and they put new rim tape on the back wheel. He said he had picked up some thorns on the same route just the other day. I did enjoy watching him work that tire back on to the rim. I think I might be able to do it a bit quicker next time!
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Old 08-08-06, 05:32 PM   #10
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Everybody gets flat tires but getting frequent flats isn't common. If you're getting numerous flats you need to analyze where they are coming from and fix it.

Holes on the inside circumference of the inner tube usually signal a rim tape failure.

Single holes on the outer circumference are common punctures that are usually caused by a thorn or bit of glass. I always line up the colored tire label with my valve stem. That way, after I find the hole in the inner tube, I can match it up with the tire. It's important to get the thorn out or you'll continue getting holes in the same place on your inner tube.

Paired holes that look like a snake's fangs made them are caused either by operator error while installing the tire or by hitting a pothole with inadequate air pressure.

A shreaded star shaped hole in your inner tube, usually accompianied by a shotgun sound, is another sign of improper tire installation. You caught a bit of your inner tube under the tire bead and the air pressure pushed the bead off of the rim.
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Old 08-08-06, 06:58 PM   #11
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Another cause of frequent flats is worn out tires. When the tread gets really thin just about anything can go through and puncture the tube.
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Old 08-08-06, 08:39 PM   #12
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I've had only one flat away from home, and that occurred while unloading my MTB from my car. Watch now I'll get a ton just cause I opened my big mouth.
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Old 08-08-06, 09:12 PM   #13
centexwoody
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that was exactly my thought when I thoughtlessly popped off about my own 'flat history'... now I'll have to go get a road pump & check the lever box with patches...
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Old 08-10-06, 10:01 AM   #14
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I had a rim that gave me flat problems and I fixed it by lining it with, don't laugh, the handy man's secret weapon, duct tape. Didn't make it bullet proof, and it could go flat again, but the problem went away. Not the most elegant solution, but it worked.
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Old 08-10-06, 10:14 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dauphin
Maybe we are just riding more....After the wrestling match of getting the tire back on the rim yesterday...(
Just a quick point on your other point...what's up with the new tires? I recently bought some new Kenda Nevegals for the MTB and it took two of us to force one of them on the rim...it was as if the tire was 25.5" rather than 26"

I'm now terrified of getting a flat on the trails as i may not be able to get it off and then back on when alone

Jeez
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Old 08-10-06, 10:45 AM   #16
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Before you put the tube back in, turn the tire inside out and spend a couple of minutes examining the inside surfact under the tread. Too often I have fixed the tube only to have another flat because I didn't find the offending piece of "wire or glass or thorn or whatever" that was still lodged in the tread area. Be careful when sliding your fingers around here, its easy to get cut
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Old 08-10-06, 10:55 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
Everybody gets flat tires but getting frequent flats isn't common. If you're getting numerous flats you need to analyze where they are coming from and fix it.

Holes on the inside circumference of the inner tube usually signal a rim tape failure.

Single holes on the outer circumference are common punctures that are usually caused by a thorn or bit of glass. I always line up the colored tire label with my valve stem. That way, after I find the hole in the inner tube, I can match it up with the tire. It's important to get the thorn out or you'll continue getting holes in the same place on your inner tube.

Paired holes that look like a snake's fangs made them are caused either by operator error while installing the tire or by hitting a pothole with inadequate air pressure.

A shreaded star shaped hole in your inner tube, usually accompianied by a shotgun sound, is another sign of improper tire installation. You caught a bit of your inner tube under the tire bead and the air pressure pushed the bead off of the rim.
+1
Retro's got it right. The best way to quit having flats is to thoroughly analyze what's causing them.
Personaly I think heavy flat resistant tires and tubes are too great a performance penalty to pay. I'd rather put my time and energy into avoiding flats by knowing what causes them.

Al
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