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Old 08-28-06, 11:33 AM   #1
Coloradopenguin
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28c vs 32c tire size

I'm waiting for a new 2007 Trek 7.6 FX, and noticed the specs have changed from '06 on the tire size. The '07 ships with 28c, narrower than the 32c I was expecting. Coming from a mtb, I did not want to go much smaller than a 32c.

My riding is 80 percent paved and 20 percent gravel and dirt roads and paths. Should I be worried about the narrower tire size and asked the LBS to swap? I welcome experiences/thoughts on the benefits of tire width from this august group.
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Old 08-28-06, 11:41 AM   #2
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I'm riding 32s on my bike right now, and I replaced the two differently sized tires that were on it when i bought the (used) bike: 23 (front) and 25 (back).

I find the 32 gives me a more comfy ride, but i'm slower than before. Now I'm wishing i had put 28s on the bike, but oh well, live and learn!

I test rode the 2006 7.6 and found it quite responsive and fast. I think it will be even faster with 28s. If it were up to me i'd stay with 28's. Then again, I wouldn't be riding that bike on gravel or dirt paths. If I were you, I'd probably stick with 32s.

Am I making any sense???
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Old 08-28-06, 11:45 AM   #3
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My road to hard-pack ratio probably isn't too different from yours. I am running Michelin Jet 'cross tires on my 'cross bike (what I ride the most) and these 700-30s are wider than other 700-35s that I see on other 'cross bikes. My view is that there may be rim standards but tire sizes don't mean much. Wait 'til you see them to decide.
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Old 08-28-06, 11:52 AM   #4
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For paved and litely graveled (rocks in the sub 1/2" size mostly) 28c should be fine. You can get some of the heavy duty tires (gatorskins or similar) that do well on the road and are tough enough for small gravel roads. A bike that has 28mm tires as standard will probably accept 32 mm tires, depending on the brakes which, if as they appear to be are cantis, should be no problem should you wish to change later.
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Old 08-28-06, 12:00 PM   #5
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Thanks for the input . . . another question: how many miles can I expect from a narrower tire? On the mtb, I've finally worn out the rear tire after about 5,000 miles.
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Old 08-28-06, 12:05 PM   #6
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I went from 25s to a 32s on my cross bike, the 32s are Specialized Infinity tires, they are rated for 75-100 psi and a tread count of 60, they have a tread design but are not a knobby tire. I ride road and stone trails but do not find them to be that much different than the 25s when I have them up to 100 psi for a road ride. Sure they weigh more than the 25's but then again I weigh more than when I was 25!
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Old 08-28-06, 02:32 PM   #7
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I am used to MTB's and several thought on Tyre size- I ride a hardtail so I have front suspension and if that rough I lift out of the saddle for rear end. Common size in use seems to be 2.1 over here. Used to be 1'9's and these were faster die to less drag. I Use 1.8's on the solo. Faster on the hard pack- not too uncomfortable or hard and in Mud I have extra frame clearance so less mud collection around the stays and I bite through to the firm surface under the gloop and get grip.

On the road bike I have 26's. I have even taken this along some offroad trails and only take care on the downhills to protect the wheels.

A wider tyre will offer some comfort- providing you use a lower pressure. Problem is that wider road contact and lower pressures will give you drag. A narrow tyre will roll easier but does offer less comfort.
Admittedly I am new to Road bikes. but I look at the 26's as a compromise already. Not the best rolling tyre on the road but just wide enough to give grip on hardpack trails.

On milage on a tyre- The tandem wrecks tyres and If I am lucky- it will wear the rear tyre down to a slick in about 1,000 miles. The solos do not not fair much better but I do use a "Performance tyre" only about 1500 on the rear before I start losing grip and the front about 2,000. However- I have had the slick tyres on the Tandenm for about 5 years and my Solo slicks are about 8. My concern with these is Age Degredation and they will both get replaced this year, even though they still have plenty of tread left.
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Old 08-28-06, 02:39 PM   #8
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You might just take the bike as it is and replace the rear with a 32 later if 28s all-around doesn't seem right. However, I'd want high pressure 28s. I use 110 psi Gatorskin 28s for a rear tire with 110 psi 25s on the front. Front tires never wear out so, unless you had some panniers over your front wheels, 32s on the front seems like too big a tire for road riding unless you have some terrible riding surfaces.
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Old 08-28-06, 03:34 PM   #9
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By current road bike standards, 28 is a wide tire. I run Panaracer Pasela TG 28s on my Bridgestone. Although this is strictly a road bike, my rides from home always start and end with about a 1/4 mile of dirt/gravel driveway. Sometimes I'll take it pretty fast at the end of a ride. The tires are no problem with that or with the occasional short detour on a dirt road. I would think the tires will not cause you any problems, but if it concerns you, why not ask about a swap? If the LBS will swap even, go for it. If they balk or want to charge you, wear out the original tires and replace them with whatever you like.
Tire wear varies greatly by tire, bike, rider, riding conditions and style. I got about 2000 miles out of my last rear tire with little sign of wear on the front FWIW.
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Old 08-28-06, 03:42 PM   #10
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Still waiting eh? My '06 7.5 also has the 32's 28's would have been an allaround better choice. They are no 1 on the upgrdae list.
Where did you see the 07 specs? I want to know if I made a rash decision in not waiting for the '07's.
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Old 08-28-06, 03:53 PM   #11
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The 2007 preview link is www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/2007_preview.html

Interestingly, the '07 preview went up on the UK site several days before the US.
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Old 08-28-06, 04:43 PM   #12
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Interesting, on the 07 7.5, they're using 32c, and on the 7.6, the 28c as you mentioned. Guess you'll be going faster!
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Old 08-28-06, 05:01 PM   #13
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My Sirrus has 28c and It is kinda dicey when you get off road. I think I would like the 32c for your application.
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Old 08-28-06, 05:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradopenguin
The 2007 preview link is www2.trekbikes.com/Bikes/2007_preview.html

Interestingly, the '07 preview went up on the UK site several days before the US.
I think I'd be much more concerned about those 20 and 24 spoke count wheels going offroad than the width of the tires.
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Old 08-28-06, 07:05 PM   #15
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I switched from 40c to 35c, and it's noticibly more squirrley on gravel and sand. I don't perceive the ride as being rougher, but that's kind of subjective, but I do pay more attention to the road surface in the turns. My routes are predominately on hard pack, so that's about as narrow as I'm going to go.
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Old 08-28-06, 08:39 PM   #16
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BluesDawg,
I am worried about the wheels as well, but I've talked with several folks who ride similar routes around here with similar spoke counts -- 3 have had no problems while one keeps bustin' spokes. Fortunately, he weighs about 60 pounds more than I do. One of those without problems actually toured on her bike from here to Canada with about 50 pounds of gear -- bringing her weight up heavier than my size.

Besides, I'm working my way into shape to do some weekend touring. I'll have to change out wheels at that point for something a bit heftier.

I've also been told riding style has a lot to do with it. Coming from a mtb background where rocks and water are my friends, the fitness/hybrid bike will require some adjustments.
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Old 08-28-06, 08:56 PM   #17
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In my Rogue's Gallery picture, I and the Romulus are coming in from a 70 miler on mostly crummy, countrified chip seal roads. I had switched for the day from 25's to a pair of Avocet 32 slicks with, I think, 70 lbs in front and 75 in back. While others complained of road buzz, I was relatively flotational. Descending on sandy, rough roads was more confident and grippy. Accelerating took a bit more effort, but when cruising at a constant speed and blabbing with friends....they performed just fine.

To me, 28's would be better for keeping on the bike all the time. But then, may as well go to a good pair of 25's and feel a bit quicker...depending on the roads you ride and your riding style. Keep a spare pair of different size tires...only takes a few minutes to switch and worth it for a longish ride....also provides a bit of variety in your riding experience.

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Old 08-29-06, 07:37 AM   #18
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Hi,
I have a similar problem. Last few years I have been using the excellent Rivendell
Ruffy Tuffy tire 27c. I love that tire. However, as the rides get longer, comfort and reliability play a larger role in my thinking. So I am contemplating getting Panaracer Paselas in a 32c next year. They aren't much slower, and I could drop about 10 psi and of course they look a bit tougher.

But giving up my Ruffy Tuffy is, well, tough. I don't think there is a clear cut answer here. You have to chose between this n that, and the only way I know how to do that is to try them. Did I mention I like my Ruffy Tuffys?
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Old 08-29-06, 08:00 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Gee
Interesting, on the 07 7.5, they're using 32c, and on the 7.6, the 28c as you mentioned. Guess you'll be going faster!
I think Trek is trying to be everything for everybody...my 7.5fx has 32c's and a 3 gear chain ring with a hybrid 11-32T cog set, the 7.6fx comes with a roadie drive train (36/50T chain ring, 12/26T cog set), so it looks like Trek is using roadie-like tires with the 28c's
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Old 08-29-06, 08:36 AM   #20
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I'll give the 28c a try. jm01 -- I've already got the LBS set to swap out the drive train to a touring setup similar to the 7.5fx. Coming from the mtb side, I'm not a speed demon but I want to be able to tackle the "hills" of western Colorado without worrying about getting to the top.

Like late said -- reliability and comfort are more important than speed. I'm assuming I'll have more flats with 28c or 32c than I'm dealing with on my fat mtb tires.
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Old 08-29-06, 08:51 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradopenguin
Like late said -- reliability and comfort are more important than speed. I'm assuming I'll have more flats with 28c or 32c than I'm dealing with on my fat mtb tires.
Width doesn't make any different. It's more a factor of what type of tire you get. If you want reliability, get some schwalbe's.
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Old 08-29-06, 09:15 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradopenguin
I'll give the 28c a try. jm01 -- I've already got the LBS set to swap out the drive train to a touring setup similar to the 7.5fx. Coming from the mtb side, I'm not a speed demon but I want to be able to tackle the "hills" of western Colorado without worrying about getting to the top.

Like late said -- reliability and comfort are more important than speed. I'm assuming I'll have more flats with 28c or 32c than I'm dealing with on my fat mtb tires.
sounds like the 7.5fx (or the 7.7fx if you want to break the piggybank) will bring those hills to their knees. The 28c's should work...I prefer a wider tire because we have some light gravel and sand on some of the roads we ride up here...

We ride the Niagara Escarpment around Georgian Bay, and the 7.5fx is perfect...my wife rides her Trek 7300 hybrid or her hybridized vintage Peugeot roadie on asphalt (the 7300 has a very similar drive train to the 7.5fx and gives her a more upright riding position which she likes)

a pic of her catching up to me on a road ride a couple of weeks ago (1000' vertical over 3 miles) and one of her favourite roadie
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Old 08-29-06, 09:18 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
Width doesn't make any different. It's more a factor of what type of tire you get. If you want reliability, get some schwalbe's.
+1...I use the Schwalbe Marathon Plus on my commuters...without a doubt the best, puncture-proof tire on the market (not inexpensive, though)
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Old 08-29-06, 02:19 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm01
+1...I use the Schwalbe Marathon Plus on my commuters...without a doubt the best, puncture-proof tire on the market (not inexpensive, though)
Yet another schwalbe marathon user here but in 26" and on the Tandem. Sizing all wrong but I use 26x1.4 and this is quite a narrow tyre for a Tandem. Pressure is quoted at 95PSI but we put in 110 and these thing roll.............. They are strong, have a long life and are puncture resistant. Saying that- I have to change them soon as Age degredation is my one worry as they are 5 years old now.
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Old 08-29-06, 02:47 PM   #25
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+1...I use the Schwalbe Marathon Plus on my commuters...without a doubt the best, puncture-proof tire on the market (not inexpensive, though)
+1 ... have a set of 32's w/ 1500 miles and no punctures...be sure to carry more than 2 tiron irons. I will put 28's on my next touring bike
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