Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-02-06, 03:13 PM   #1
iks
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cold weather clothes

I have not made the switch to lycra just yet but I assume I will when I become more concerned with wicking off sweat next summer and being aero and light, but now Fall approaches. What do you use to stay warm with? Right now it's 64, breezy and too cold in just a tee-shirt. What is your temperature range for riding?
iks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 03:23 PM   #2
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by iks
I have not made the switch to lycra just yet but I assume I will when I become more concerned with wicking off sweat next summer and being aero and light, but now Fall approaches. What do you use to stay warm with? Right now it's 64, breezy and too cold in just a tee-shirt. What is your temperature range for riding?
I would be OK in 64F in a T, but that is me. anything above 60 is shorts and a jersey or T.

I ride from about 32F - Hot.

I don't have any "fancy" clothes for the colder weather. I have two long-sleeve jerseys with hoods, which help considerably in keeping the head warm. I have a "skull cap" out of that felt-like black material whose name has slipped me so far. I have an all weather jacket from LL Bean that is light and does pretty good. I have two different "tights" - one light and one heavy - at times I have been known to put them both on. If wet, I have some nylon-like waterproof pants to go over.

I use some gloves I bought at Target a few years back, or for really cold, my "snow" gloves, which are like skiing gloves. I have a Balaclava if necessary.

I pretty much look like a demented ice-cube-like Fred when I get all dressed up for the colder days.

I don't own one piece of GoreTex or similar, but sort of wish I did, although it would go against my cheap-skate side!

For about 50-60, I wear a jersey and a windbreaker, sometimes two jerseys on top of each other.

"Layers" is the operative word.

Today in 43F, on a purely recreational ride with my wife, I wore Levis, a T shirt, a sweat shirt, and a windbreaker with my Targert gloves and tennis shoes. Did me fine for a couple of hours of riding.

Scary, isn't it!

Last edited by DnvrFox; 09-02-06 at 03:32 PM.
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 03:24 PM   #3
mcadam
Member
 
mcadam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Farmington, NM
Bikes: Mongoose Crossway 850, upgraded
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here in the 4-Corners area, it might be 15 degrees in a Jan. morning and probably 100 in a July afternoon. For cold I find it most important to keep fingers and face warm.
mcadam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 03:24 PM   #4
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
-10 to Phew.

The art of cold weather riding is to keep the hands and feet warm- Don't get the body cold and carry a portable fire on the bike.

Generally find that layers works best- and if wet a waterproof that is waterproof and breathable. Main problem is at the start of a ride- before the body gets warm but as soon as it is warm- then unzip or take off a layer.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 05:44 PM   #5
NOS88
Senior Member
 
NOS88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
Bikes:
Posts: 6,490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Agree with the others about hands and feet. Also would suggest a very good base layer that wicks moisture away from the skin (cotton is a very poor choice, because it hold water). Additionally, the wind in my area picks up considerably as the days grow shorter, and I need good wind blocking outer layers. Personally, I think an investment in quality cold weather riding gear is well worth the investment.
__________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831
NOS88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 05:46 PM   #6
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would only add that it's a good idea to have your pie heated, as well. Warm deep dish apple pie with some vanilla ice cream on top -- that's the cold weather ticket!
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 05:49 PM   #7
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,305
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
stapfam is right about keeping the hands and feet warm, which is one reason I wear full-finger gloves frequently.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 05:57 PM   #8
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Gee
I would only add that it's a good idea to have your pie heated, as well. Warm deep dish apple pie with some vanilla ice cream on top -- that's the cold weather ticket!
Errr . . . what would you, San Diegoite, know about cold weather?
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 06:29 PM   #9
Cadillac
Senior Member
 
Cadillac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chilliwack, BC
Bikes: Trek 2000, Catrike, Gitane tandem, no-name mountain bike
Posts: 224
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cold weather clothing

Below 65°F (18°C) I make sure my knees are covered. This is particularly important as we grow older. Many riders suppose that since they can walk around in shorts at that temp, they can ride in that temp too. The problem is that wind-chill (created by cycling) will pull the heat off the knees. The alternative to wearing tights is a heat salve that racers use.

I will cycle in temps dropping to -5°F (-20°C), but as the temp drops, my clothing requirements change accordingly.

50°F to 65°F (10°C to 18°C) = Helmet, short-sleeve cycling shirt, light cycling shell jacket, fingerless cycling gloves, cycling shorts, lycra shorts, socks, cycling shoes
35°F to 50°F (2°C to 10°C) = Helmet, long-sleeve cycling shirt, wool vest, light cycling shell jacket, long-finger cycling gloves, cycling shorts, lycra tights, socks, cycling shoes
10°F to 35°F (-12°C to 2°C)= Helmet, balaclava, long-sleeve cycling shirt, wool vest, down jacket, light 99-cent wool gloves inside long-fingered cycling gloves or leather winter mitts, cycling shorts, lycra tights, cotton trousers, two pair of socks, cycling shoes, neoprene booties
-5°F to +10°F (-20°C to -12°C)= Helmet, balaclava, long-sleeve cycling shirt, one-piece Ski-Doo(R) suit, 99-cent wool gloves inside leather winter mitts, cotton trousers, two pairs of thermal socks, cycling shoes, neoprene booties
Cadillac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 06:38 PM   #10
ajf
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As it gets cooler, leg warmers and arm warmers.
When it gets chilly, tights and long sleeved jerseys.
When it gets cold, add leg warmers and arm warmers to tights and long sleeved jersey, and consider insulated gloves and booties made for cycling.
When it gets really cold and windy, add them all together, and get a windproof jacket.
To keep my face warm, I grow a beard every winter.
This, plus Lycra shorts and a short sleeved jersey used to keep me comfortable in California from the low twenties to one hundred plus.
Unfortunately, they all seem to have shrunk in the 14 years since I last did any serious cycling.

-a.
ajf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 07:15 PM   #11
iks
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As it happens I like pie!
iks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 07:20 PM   #12
67walkon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Tequesta, Florida
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Giant Hybrid
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What is "cold weather"? Here on the Treasure Coast of Florida, it is only hot or not so hot. I have only been riding for about a month, so I don't know what I'll do when it gets frigid here and drops below 70!

Actually, one of my other passions is an old British Sports Car, a 1971 TR6. The guys up north put their cars in the garage and work on them in the winter, while we take ours out of the garage and drive them in the winter! I suspect biking will be the same. It will just be easier to to ride longer when things cool off a bit!

John
67walkon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-06, 08:35 PM   #13
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DnvrFox
Errr . . . what would you, San Diegoite, know about cold weather?
My momma taught me to respect my elders and so I won't offer a retort to this, despite the temptation.
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 01:43 AM   #14
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 67walkon
What is "cold weather"? Here on the Treasure Coast of Florida, it is only hot or not so hot. I have only been riding for about a month, so I don't know what I'll do when it gets frigid here and drops below 70!


John
Cold weather here is when the gloop called mud, that does tire you out after about 5 miles of it, actually congeals with a layer of ice over the top to give you a firmer surface to ride over. Very cold is when you can't break through the ice on the puddles to get through to the water to wash the mud off your bike that has suddenly added 10lbs to the weight of your bike.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 09:42 AM   #15
John K
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Rural Madison County, Iowa
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Elite, Specialized Rockhopper, S E BM Flyer, Diamondback Drifter 1
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Burrr

I'll go as long as it's in the 20's Fahrenheit. Any colder than that I'll stay home. I just bundle up and go.
Go ride, John K.
John K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 01:52 PM   #16
jppe
Let's do a Century
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Bikes: Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Cervelo P2C/Duraace
Posts: 6,656
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Like some others, riding in cold weather can actually be fun if you're properly dressed. It's even more important to wear underlayers that have the ability to wick moisture away from the body in colder weather. You're still going to sweat and you don't want that moisture to stay next to your skin or else it turns the skin beet red and you get too chilled!!! It also helps to have garments that aide in blocking the cold air as well. Remember that you are moving through some very cold air and it penetrates the clothing in a heartbeat. Most non-cycling clothing tend to let too much cold air through the material and that causes real issues including too much heat loss. A lightweight wind vest or a jersey/jacket with that material on the front is a terrific investment.

Invest a little in proper riding gear for cold weather and you can ride as long as the roads will let you stay upright.
jppe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 06:57 PM   #17
Cadillac
Senior Member
 
Cadillac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chilliwack, BC
Bikes: Trek 2000, Catrike, Gitane tandem, no-name mountain bike
Posts: 224
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Clothing

Even though you are wearing clothing to keep you warm enough as you ride along a flat road, you may find that as you go up a mountain hill that you are overheating. When that happens, you can unzip your jacket or open up the sleeves or remove your gloves, etc.

Generally you don't want to stop to remove a jacket because getting underway again up a hill can be difficult.

However, when you go down the other side, there is another danger. You need to put on extra clothing. At this point it is always wise to stop. If you watch the Tour de France, you will notice that on the crest of the downhill someone from the spectators will hand the rider a newspaper. The rider will tuck the paper under his jersey to prevent hpothermia.

If you live in Florida or Winnipeg, ignore these instructions
Cadillac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 07:18 PM   #18
Grampy™
Geezer Member
 
Grampy™'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Bikes: Airborne, LeMond, Bianchi CX, Volae Century, Redline 925 (fixed) and a Burley Tandem.
Posts: 1,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've decided Iowa is not going to get cold this year.

Last year I rode in weather as cold as -5 F. This winter Iowa will get down to the 60's but that is it. It will not get cold.
__________________
Carpe who?
Grampy™ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 07:24 PM   #19
Wes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Kansas City, MO
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you dont want it to get cold this year, do not run over those Wolley(whatever) worms. They will get mad and we will really be in for it this winter.
Wes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 07:31 PM   #20
Grampy™
Geezer Member
 
Grampy™'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Bikes: Airborne, LeMond, Bianchi CX, Volae Century, Redline 925 (fixed) and a Burley Tandem.
Posts: 1,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes
If you dont want it to get cold this year, do not run over those Wolley(whatever) worms. They will get mad and we will really be in for it this winter.
They have been really light colored this year..... I think this is suppose to be a good sign.
__________________
Carpe who?
Grampy™ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 07:43 PM   #21
CRUM
Recovering Retro-grouch
 
CRUM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Some call it God's country. I call it Acton, Maine
Bikes: Too Many - 7 or 8
Posts: 5,008
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by iks
I have not made the switch to lycra just yet but I assume I will when I become more concerned with wicking off sweat next summer and being aero and light, but now Fall approaches. What do you use to stay warm with? Right now it's 64, breezy and too cold in just a tee-shirt. What is your temperature range for riding?
64'F? Jeez, that's still shorts and barefoot wheather around here. Today was drizzly and about 58' to 60'F. Almost balmy. Wore the usual short sleeve jersey and Lycra shorts. As the temps dip I do at least bring along something to put on should I get cold. Below 55'F or so.

Up here if we choose to not ride below 50'F, then we are relegated to only having maybe 3 months of riding wheather. I ride all year long. From below 0 to around 20'F I will usually keep as much skin covered as possible. Bacalavas for the face, thickly insulated work boots and snowmobile gloves. Then starting with good poly pro long johns, I layer from there. Finish off with a wind resistant layer. What I tell customers who want to ride in the winter is to not over dress, but always have enough with you to overdress should you need it. The biggest problem I think is trapping moisture against the skin when it is cold out. I always advise a good wicking layer first. Then use appropriate clothing on top.
__________________
Keep it 'tween the ditches

My Blog - Lost in the Bo Zone
CRUM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-06, 07:46 PM   #22
PseudoCrow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Creve Coeur, MO
Bikes: Pinarello Opera
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cold Weather Wear

I've had good luck with winter gear from Foxwear (no connection, just a satisfied customer). I can wear a base layer Polartec T-shirt and my bibs, with an E-Vap Jacket and Powder Stretch tights over, down into the low 40s on a sunny day. Prices are exceptionally reasonable. www.foxwear.net
PseudoCrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-06, 09:01 PM   #23
Old Hammer Boy
Senior Member
 
Old Hammer Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Utah
Bikes: Trek, Cannondale Tandem, Surly LHT
Posts: 1,082
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Layers, layers, layers--- that's the key. We ride down to about 10F and everything is light weight. First, start with a wicking T. You can get Cool Max (or similar) undershirts at Campmore at a reasonable price. Then, I wear a long sleeve jersey, a wind vest, and a light weight jacket. Down under I wear tights and wind pants. If it's cold enough I put booties on over my regular cycling shoes. Of course, gloves and head gear. I've found out if I keep my core temp up and work hard, my hands and feet stay warm. If my hands get real cold, I put them behind my back for awhile, one hand at a time, alternating just to get them out of the wind. Sometimes I wear a skull cap with ear covers, or just an ear band, depending upon how cold it is. If it's really cold, a balacava is great. My stoker actually enjoys winter riding over a hot summer day any time. I like it hot, but find with the correct winter clothing, year around cycling is very possible. Road conditions are the only deterent.
Old Hammer Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-06, 06:32 AM   #24
Baggsy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Rural Wyoming
Bikes: '73 Schwinn Varsity, 1964 Schwinn Racer, 1954 Schwinn Jaguar, 1950's Puch Bergmeister, 1980 Schwinn High Plains, 1973 Flandria, 1980's Diamondback Sorrento, 2001 Jamis Aurora
Posts: 295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to weigh in on this one, as the cold is my norm out here 9 months of the year. Last year 26 below was the lowest I commuted in, but that isn't as bad as some warmer days with high wind and viscious wind chill. Layers and wool are the clothes-de-jour when the white stuff start flying around here. You won't get any OCP points for it, and you won't look like a cyclist, but polypropolene long johns, flannel or wool shirt, Woolrich malone pants, and a down filled coat will cover the torso nicely. The wind will bite thru the pants at times and Carhartt overalls are needed then. The tight canvas will stop the wind. Good wicking socks (stay away from cotton) with another pair of woolie socks over them and your best Red Wing hunting boots will keep your feet toasty, no room for clipped shoes when it gets that cold.

Gloves will make or break you in sub zero temps...above that a good pair of lined leather gloves, or fleece undergloves with a leather over will keep you pretty comfortable. When it get's real cold, chopper mittens with long gaunlet tops are your only course of action. That leaves out shifting of any kind, but when it's that cold, things freeze up and shifting becomes a moot point anyway. It's fixed gear time with nothing to freeze up on them. Full head balaclava's are great, but a good scarf and a wool stocking hat can keep most of your noggin covered up. I tend to freeze up around the mouth on the balaclava.

The old goose hunters around here use those little 'warm thing' packets that have some kind of activated char-coal or something in them. You open them, shake them around, and they put off heat enough to stave the frostbite off. In your shirt pocket, in your mittens, or in the top of your boots they'll make people rave at how damn tough you must be. The disposable are ok, but there's some you can reuse by boiling them...they are NICE!

You end up looking like Nanook, but then again, warm never goes out of style around here - not for very long anyway...
Baggsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-06, 06:40 AM   #25
iks
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Do standard colorfiul cycling clothes, the Lycra's and Gore-tex stuff, keep you warm at all? Are they windbreakers or designed to breath instead? I would think that you wear the wick-able stuff underneath and then a light shell of windbrreaker for the cold weather. Are leg and arm warmers obtainable at department stores or are the best ones only gotten on-line or at the LBS?

Last edited by iks; 09-05-06 at 07:04 AM.
iks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:33 AM.