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Old 01-05-07, 08:39 AM   #1
Woodlark
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Pedalphobia

I have only been riding for a couple months. I have an upright bike and a trike. I recently put clipless pedals on both (Nashbar SPD type). Clipping into the pedals on the trike is relatively easy, and I really like the assist the pedals give me. On the upright, I just can't seem to get clipped in. I suspect that I am so afraid of falling over that I don't try hard enough (falling over isn't an issue on the trike ). Any body had the same problem and willing to share your solution with me?
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Old 01-05-07, 09:06 AM   #2
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You might consider taking your bike to the local shop to see if the pedals are adjusted properly. The clip-in device (or whatever it's called) might be too tight. Also if you have access to a machine called a trainer you can practice clipping in without fear of falling over. examples of trainers here: http://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=3403551
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Old 01-05-07, 10:54 AM   #3
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Agree with Blackberry. Are you able to get one foot in? Are these double sided SPDs or single? The bike on the trainer approach is the best. Without the trainer, find a flat section of parking lot with no moving cars or curbs (in case you fall). Assuming you can get one foot in, just start to pedal and do not worry about the other foot cleating until you get some speed. Then try for the other foot. If you just put in one foot and hop on the bike and give 1/2 one revolution of the crank, it will not generate enough speed to give you time to get the other one clipped in before you lose your balance. Once you learn the technique, you will click in the other foot within one revolution and it will feel like second nature.
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Old 01-05-07, 11:38 AM   #4
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Just don't forget to unclip before you stop............... (But you will.)
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Old 01-08-07, 02:01 PM   #5
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I think I have figured out my problem. While both bikes have pedals that are Nashbar SPD equivalents, the trike has double sided clipless whereas the upright has single-sided and the lugged sole of my shoe (MTB style) intereferes with clicking in on the combo pedals. If I am going to use the same shoes for both bikes, I need to either replace the shoe or the pedals. At this point, I am inclined to replace both sets of pedals. Based on what I have read online, I am inclined to go with Crank Bros., either Eggbeaters or Candy.
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Old 01-08-07, 02:07 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlark
I think I have figured out my problem. While both bikes have pedals that are Nashbar SPD equivalents, the trike has double sided clipless whereas the upright has single-sided and the lugged sole of my shoe (MTB style) intereferes with clicking in on the combo pedals. If I am going to use the same shoes for both bikes, I need to either replace the shoe or the pedals. At this point, I am inclined to replace both sets of pedals. Based on what I have read online, I am inclined to go with Crank Bros., either Eggbeaters or Candy.
Changing to something new is always an adventure, but if you like the two sided Nashbar pedals, then you could just get a similar set from Nashbar.
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Old 01-08-07, 07:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlark
I think I have figured out my problem. While both bikes have pedals that are Nashbar SPD equivalents, the trike has double sided clipless whereas the upright has single-sided and the lugged sole of my shoe (MTB style) intereferes with clicking in on the combo pedals. If I am going to use the same shoes for both bikes, I need to either replace the shoe or the pedals. At this point, I am inclined to replace both sets of pedals. Based on what I have read online, I am inclined to go with Crank Bros., either Eggbeaters or Candy.
I have mtn bike shoes and single sided Shimano pedals and have no problem. Perhaps all you need is an adjustment?
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Old 01-08-07, 08:58 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlark
I think I have figured out my problem. While both bikes have pedals that are Nashbar SPD equivalents, the trike has double sided clipless whereas the upright has single-sided and the lugged sole of my shoe (MTB style) intereferes with clicking in on the combo pedals. If I am going to use the same shoes for both bikes, I need to either replace the shoe or the pedals. At this point, I am inclined to replace both sets of pedals. Based on what I have read online, I am inclined to go with Crank Bros., either Eggbeaters or Candy.
You might try to fix the shoe. I have cut into cleats with a sharp
knife to make SPD type pedals work. Perhaps a Dremel tool will make
it easy.
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Old 01-08-07, 09:48 PM   #9
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Two-sided pedals are easier, I think. I rode the Shimano M324's for a while, primarily for mountain biking. I finally decided to move up to the M540's (I think that's the name) and they're actually easier. They also work better than the Performance brand in the same style.

A lot of folks cut out the rubber around recessed clips, but I'd hate to do that.

And remember, watching a biker go down because they can't get unclipped is a priceless MasterCard moment. Think of the joy you bring others. I've certainly given the world a few chuckles.

One other thing. You can adjust the release pressures fairly easily with most brands. Mine were set so low for a while that if I sneezed hard I'd clip out. Give that a whirl.
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Old 01-11-07, 10:36 PM   #10
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Just a quick thought, most Nashbar pedals use the same cleat, but not all. They have a very inexpensive two sided mountain pedal that uses a cleat that won't work with a lot of other (shimano included, and nashbars single sided) pedals. I think the cleat is marked H20... Drove me nuts until I figured it out. Try swapping the cleats if you think this may be it, the single sided cleats will work with the double sided pedal, it's the other way around that can cause problems with the low cost pedal/cleat they sell.
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Old 01-12-07, 05:25 AM   #11
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Just got off the Ebay thread. I've gotten two Shimano 540's off Ebay, both for $39/pair, and that included shipping. Can't beat that with Nashbar, and the quality? Ya gotta love it.
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Old 01-12-07, 06:36 AM   #12
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I adjusted the pedal tension as low as it would go without the screw actually falling out. I also tried both sets of cleats. It was still very hard to click in and once I did get clicked in, it was very difficult to get out. I researched on the web, and although most people have good luck with SPD style pedals, there seem to be a fairly high number who don't (including me apparenty).

Both Speedplay and Crank Brothers seem to have a very strong and faithful following (Bebops too, but they are very hard to find). I agonized over which to get, but finally ordered two pairs of Crank Brothers Candy SL pedals. They haven't arrived yet, but after I try them out, I'll post my (hopefully good) experiences with them.
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Old 01-12-07, 08:54 AM   #13
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Woodlark, FWIW, I have a pair of the Nashbar (Wellgo?) platform/clipless combo pedals and I found they did not connect and disconnect as well as other types of MTB pedal I've used (real SPDs and other clones). My biggest problem was in releasing quickly.

I think you'll find your Crank Bros. pedals to be easier to deal with. I use Eggbeaters on my MTB and Smartys on my multi-purpose Frankenbike. They have the best engagement/disengagement of anything I've used.

But with any pedal system it will be important to make sure the cleat is installed correctly on the shoe. As someone else said, some shoes have so much tread that they can interfere with the pedal/cleat action. My Smartys came with optional shims to use in case of such interference. Also, be sure to install the cleat with 2 circles on the right shoe for quicker release (per the instructions).

Good luck! Confidence will come with familiarity. So if you do fall, just get up and keep going.
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