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sourdough 01-08-07 04:38 PM

Specialized Sirrus or Trek 7.5 FX disc
 
Hello

I have been haveing a struggle trying to buy another bike. I am going from a mountian bike to a 700 sized bike.

I wonder if anybody had opinions on the Specialized Sirrus or Trek 7.5 FX. I even thought about a Kona Dr Dew?

I would want to put 35 to 38 tires for some of our gravel roads,and light groomed trails.

thanks

stapfam 01-09-07 11:37 AM

Don't like Specialised- Trek have too many inhouse components and Kona's have got heavy over the past few years. Having said that- Kona's Make some of the better bikes around- Trek's are very popular and the Cirrus is one of those bikes that I intend to test ride sometime this year.

All 3 are good bikes

You could have given us a more open choice as I would have difficulty choosing between these 3 so it is down to test rides- Deals available- and which LBS will give you better After sales service.

BluesDawg 01-09-07 11:38 AM

Get the one you like best from the best dealer.

Tom Bombadil 01-09-07 03:15 PM

Both the Sirrus and 7.5FX are popular bikes. They are similar in many ways, in that they are lighter than hybrids and use flat handlebars. The gearing is about the same, the riding position is similar. The Trek cost a bit more and that is reflected in it having a bit better components, for example the rear derailleur is Tiagra on the Trek, but Sora on the Sirrus. The fork is carbon on the Trek, but aluminum on the Sirrus. It is left up to you to decide if these things are important to you. Both are good values for the price. But you could have problems changing out the standard 700x28 tires for 700x35 or 700x38. Have you checked to see if the wheels & frames can accept the larger tires? Most people buying these bikes specifically want the thinner tires, so it isn't common for them to be changed out for 700x38s. Their lower models tend to have the thicker tires, for example the Trek 7.2FX comes standard with 700x35, but they use different wheels on it.

sourdough 01-09-07 05:34 PM

buying bike
 
Thanks for the info. It is such a difficult choice.

Someone once told me with most bike companys you are just buying the frame and you sort of have to decide on which components are best.

I am going from a mountian bike with those big fat tires. It is a Specialized Expedition. It fits so good but is very slow. But very comfortable.

The Trek 7.5 FX disc, a dealer told me can have wider tire put on. With the disc breaks the bike is heavier than the Sirrus.

The Sirrus Sport and Comp have carbon forks which should make for lighter and is less money.
The Sport is 799.00 Canadian and the Trek is 950.00.

What I also want to do to one of these bikes if raise the stem up alittle with the option of tilting the bars back a little, somthing like my Expedition.

sourdough 01-09-07 05:35 PM

Specialized
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by stapfam
Don't like Specialised- Trek have too many inhouse components and Kona's have got heavy over the past few years. Having said that- Kona's Make some of the better bikes around- Trek's are very popular and the Cirrus is one of those bikes that I intend to test ride sometime this year.

All 3 are good bikes

You could have given us a more open choice as I would have difficulty choosing between these 3 so it is down to test rides- Deals available- and which LBS will give you better After sales service.


Why don't you like Specialized?

sourdough 01-09-07 06:09 PM

Has anyone heard of the Specialized Cross Trail?
I think it is new for 2007

http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...d=07Crosstrail

BluesDawg 01-09-07 06:50 PM

Looks pretty good, but do you really need the suspension fork? I would go for the similar rigid-fork Globe models for road, path or light trail riding. They seem to have handlebars with a little rearward sweep, but I'd probably swap for more.
<edit> I like the Dr. Dew too, but again, I'd go for a more swept handlebar to avoid numb hands.

Tom Bombadil 01-09-07 07:49 PM

I looked at the Crosstrail and then thought that it wasn't that close to what you had described in your first post so I didn't mention it. It is much more of an off-road bike than the Sirrus or 7.5 FX. It has a front suspension vs the Trek's rigid fork carbon, that is a BIG difference in weight. And the Crosstrail has very large nearly 2" wide tires. And disc brakes too. So it is much beefier type of bike, that looks like it is aimed at being able to do some road, some paths, and some mountain biking, with an emphasis on the latter. As such, it looks like a nice bike, but you have to determine if its design meets your expected usage.

sdr 01-10-07 02:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sourdough
Has anyone heard of the Specialized Cross Trail?
I think it is new for 2007

i just got the cross trail limited for christmas. this bike is perfect for the type of riding that i do - a mix of street, rail trails and off road. the 'limited' is a little pricey for a hybrid but i love the components and the bike is beautiful.

i especially love the bike's geometry! so far the only thing i would change would be the brakes. i would prefer the avid single digit 7's over the avid juicy 5's the bike came with. i will eventually upgrade to avid juicy 7's since the bike is already set-up for disc.

compared to the gary fisher nirvana s that i had been riding the CT Limited is lightening fast even with the 29x1.9in. semi-slick tires that came stock on the bike. the 700c wheels allow for just about any size tire, however. i lean toward the mountain bike tire for my riding preferences and this one cruises the street quite fast and quite comfortably.

my primary concern was going from shimano shifters to SRAM. i can honestly say, after riding the CT, that i am now an SRAM convert - love 'em!

i give the bike two thumbs - waaaaaay up!

http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...d=07Crosstrail
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2..._SatSliver.jpg
i added these shimano XC platform pedals: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...no_PD-MX30.jpg

jm01 01-10-07 09:54 AM

4 Attachment(s)
Take some care here as both are very different bikes...I have a Trek 7.5fx and it has a 48T #3 chain ring and a 11-32T cog set...a standard hybrid set up...climbs well, but is very slow at the high end.

My wife has a Opus flat bar roadie, very similar to the Sirrus, 52T chain ring, 11-25T cog set...she has to drop down a chain ring on the climbs, sometime uses the granny if windy, but this bike can fly...i have problems keeping up with her.

Also, the Trek is all alunimum, but the 2007 sirrus has a carbon fork and rear triangle, and costs $100 cdn less than the 2006...and the Sirrus sizing is better for me. I ride a 19" Trek frame, yet the 7.5fx comes in 17'5" and 20"...i got the 20" and the top tube is too long...even with the riser stem i swapped in

I'm already planning on ditching the 7.5fx and getting the Sirrus in the spring.

EDIT: no need for wider tires...my wife rides 28's and I have 32's that work well on packed gravel and groomed trails...we both have MTB's for the rough stuff :)

see:

NOS88 01-10-07 10:13 AM

There are several different model for 2007 in the Specialized Sirrus line. The difference is enough to have an impact on the ride experience. With that said, I suspect any of the three bikes you've mentioned will serve your needs for now. I'd encourage you to try and get a 5 to 10 mile test ride on each that is properly fitted for you.

stapfam 01-10-07 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sourdough
Why don't you like Specialized?


Over rated Mountain bikes that have a big name from Road bikes- but Are heavy- Too many inhouse components and too expensive. Road bikes are fine- Despite the overrated name- inouse components and the price.

You either like a bike or you don't.

BluesDawg 01-10-07 11:13 AM

^ Not a generally held opinion where I live.

My $600 Rockhopper Comp weighs 28lbs. The major components are Shimano, Sun, Rock Shox etc. It seems sturdy and handles nicely.

Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but how strongly they are held has no bearing on their validity.

Tom Bombadil 01-10-07 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jm01

Also, the Trek is all alunimum, but the 2007 sirrus has a carbon fork and rear triangle

The 2007 7.5 FX has a carbon fork.

jm01 01-10-07 12:29 PM

1 Attachment(s)
yep, but still that POS drive train and same frame sizes...same set up as the specialized cross trail HT,

My wife also has a Trek 7300...same alpha frame and essentially a 7.5fx with suspension, fatter tires, and comfort bars. She hasn't been on it since she got the Opus

Digital Gee 01-10-07 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jm01
yep, but still that POS drive train and same frame siazes...same set up as the specialized cross trail HT,

My wife also has a Trek 7300...same alpha frame and essentially a 7.5fx with suspension, fatter tires, and comfort bars. She hasn't been on it since she got the Opus

Perhaps that's because there isn't much room to ride around your living room? :D

jm01 01-10-07 12:39 PM

A couch potato? :D

Tom Bombadil 01-10-07 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jm01
She hasn't been on it since she got the Opus

That's what we used bike buyers like. I got my lightly used Trek 7600 at >65% off of list price from a woman who moved to a road bike.

And I got my well-used Trek 820 ex-MTB now-in-town-roundabout bike at >85% off of list from a different woman who moved to a road bike.

sourdough 01-10-07 03:55 PM

opus
 
That Opus looks like a nice bike. I have never heard of them. From here the tires look bigger that 28's.

Did you say the gearing is more like Sirrus?

Why are you not considering a Opus for yourself rather than the Sirrus?

sourdough 01-10-07 04:00 PM

Crosstrail
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sdr
i just got the cross trail limited for christmas. this bike is perfect for the type of riding that i do - a mix of street, rail trails and off road. the 'limited' is a little pricey for a hybrid but i love the components and the bike is beautiful.

i especially love the bike's geometry! so far the only thing i would change would be the brakes. i would prefer the avid single digit 7's over the avid juicy 5's the bike came with. i will eventually upgrade to avid juicy 7's since the bike is already set-up for disc.

compared to the gary fisher nirvana s that i had been riding the CT Limited is lightening fast even with the 29x1.9in. semi-slick tires that came stock on the bike. the 700c wheels allow for just about any size tire, however. i lean toward the mountain bike tire for my riding preferences and this one cruises the street quite fast and quite comfortably.

my primary concern was going from shimano shifters to SRAM. i can honestly say, after riding the CT, that i am now an SRAM convert - love 'em!

i give the bike two thumbs - waaaaaay up!

http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...d=07Crosstrail
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2..._SatSliver.jpg
i added these shimano XC platform pedals: http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...no_PD-MX30.jpg


Nice looking bike!
Is this type of bike refered to a 29er? Anyways what doe that mean?

How much would it weigh?

Another bike I should check out.

I think the answer to this bike delemia is to get 2 bikes for the various riding conditions.

Coloradopenguin 01-10-07 11:15 PM

I have first hand experience with this question. I bought the Trek 7.5 FX in August, but the company failed to deliver the bike by November. So I bought the Sirrus Comp, and managed to get about 200 miles on it before the snow shut down the riding season.

The Comp has CF fork and seat stays, Tiagra rear shifter, a road triple front. I had the LBS swap the rear cassette to a 32-11, giving me great climbing power and as much speed as I need (just have to be careful about cross-chaining). I also swapped the grips, but everything else is stock.

I liked both bikes on my test rides, and I really like the Sirrus Comp -- every time I ride I end up with a big grin on my face! The only downside -- I really wanted the bright red Trek frame ;)

Bottom line -- test ride as many bikes as you can. Each has things you will like, and dislike. For me, the Sirrus Comp was a terrific choice.

sourdough 01-12-07 03:17 PM

Sirrus
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Coloradopenguin
I have first hand experience with this question. I bought the Trek 7.5 FX in August, but the company failed to deliver the bike by November. So I bought the Sirrus Comp, and managed to get about 200 miles on it before the snow shut down the riding season.

The Comp has CF fork and seat stays, Tiagra rear shifter, a road triple front. I had the LBS swap the rear cassette to a 32-11, giving me great climbing power and as much speed as I need (just have to be careful about cross-chaining). I also swapped the grips, but everything else is stock.

I liked both bikes on my test rides, and I really like the Sirrus Comp -- every time I ride I end up with a big grin on my face! The only downside -- I really wanted the bright red Trek frame ;)

Bottom line -- test ride as many bikes as you can. Each has things you will like, and dislike. For me, the Sirrus Comp was a terrific choice.


Thanks for your information.

If I was to consider this type of bike which sounds very nice.

Am I being unrealistic in wanting to raise the stem up and back to get a more upright ridding position.

I would want 35's for tires

Did swapping the rear cassstte make much of a differance?

thanks

Coloradopenguin 01-12-07 05:25 PM

As for raising the stem, my front fork was damaged in shipping and was replaced under warranty. When the LBS made the swap, I asked them to increase the stem by 1" to get the bar higher. This is possible only on installation, because they cut the stem to length, so I was able to raise my bar without swapping components. This helped ease the pressure on my wrists, and I am very pleased with the riding position. It is not as upright as my mountain bike, but not as forward as a road bike. I have noticed it is easier to stand and crank on the Sirrus than on my old mountain bike.

If you end up ordering a new bike, talk to the LBS about stem height. As I learned in swapping forks, the stem height is set at the height of where the riser tube is cut. When the fork is installed, that cut can be a little higher -- giving you a higher stem position.

As for tires, I was worried about the 28s but my fears were unwarranted. I've taken the bike on crushed rock trails, gravel country roads, etc. without any problems. I have lowered the pressure from 120 lbs. to around 90, which softened the ride nicely. The narrower tires make a noticable difference on the road drag, and I'm glad I did not go with a wider tire.

As for the rear cassette swap to a 32-11, I did not give up anything on the speed side of the gearing, while improving my climbing (low) gearing by 20 percent (from 31.2 gear inches to 25.3 gear inches). In other words, the new cassette gives me two additional gears on the low end. The only issue with the new cassette is cross-chaining, but this is a minor inconvenience for gaining a lot of climbing power.

Hope this helps. I learned a great deal about bikes as I went through the buying process, and these all things I spent hours researching before going in to the LBS.

If you have other questions, just ask.

BluesDawg 01-12-07 07:00 PM

Sourdough,
Reading through this thread again, I notice that you currently have a comfort bike, the Specialized Expedition. I was a little confused because you refer to it as a mountain bike. That bike does have 26" wheels, but it sure isn't a mountain bike!
I think you need to take a little more time to look at the range of bike types available from the dealers in your area. There may be models that come closer to what you want with fewer changes. A good salesperson who will take the time to listen to what you want to do with the bike could be very helpful in wading through the overwhelming variety available.


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