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-   -   After a tube is patched.... (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/271703-after-tube-patched.html)

jppe 02-23-07 07:14 AM

After a tube is patched....
 
Okay-I have now patched a couple of pretty new tubes. It looks like they're going to be fine and they are now ready for getting put back into play.

It's a dumb question-but who has a favorite way of folding or rolling up the tube so it's neat and "pretty" and easy to use when the time comes? These have the longer stems if that makes and difference.

I'm a visual learner so any pictures sure would be nice. I know-I'm asking a lot!!

Lion Steve 02-23-07 07:50 AM

I would just take a look at a new tube when you take it out of the box. Try to copy that.

ollo_ollo 02-23-07 08:40 AM

4 Attachment(s)
Fold it at the stem with stem on the inside, fold in half, repeat until it looks right (or you can't fold anymore), fasten it between your Brooks saddle rails with a toe clip strap (or piece of elastic or velcro band). Sometimes I add a pair of tire levers to the mix. Here are some pics but the tube doesn't show much when done properly. The Koski saddle just has the elastic strip, no tube. edit(our supermart just started using a velcro strip to bind their heads of lettuce, they work great for holding a tube under the saddle but I don't know about longevity) Don

BSLeVan 02-23-07 09:41 AM

I fold mine with the stem toward the center, much as ollo ollo describes. I take two rubber bands (made from old tubes I've cut up) and wrap around both ends. With presta valves, it's important to keep the valve open when you do this, or you never get all of the air out. Then I put it in a small zip-lock sandwich bag with a bit of baby powder (talc). After which it goes into the saddle bag. BTW, I keep pocket change, tire levers, patch kit, etc. all in their own zip lock bags. They weigh next to nothing, and it just makes keeping things organized easier.

Louis 02-23-07 11:42 AM

However you roll or fold the tube be sure to screw a valve cap onto it, even if you ride without valve caps, as many do. Those sharp presta tips can vibrate a hole in anything, including the tube itself, while riding in your seat pack.

Big Paulie 02-23-07 01:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Louis
However you roll or fold the tube be sure to screw a valve cap onto it, even if you ride without valve caps, as many do. Those sharp presta tips can vibrate a hole in anything, including the tube itself, while riding in your seat pack.

Good tip...I'd never thought of it.

John E 02-23-07 04:33 PM

I try to roll or fold the tube much the way a new one is packaged, but I try to vary the positions of the folds and creases. I also roll or fold it no tighter than absolutely necessary to fit into my toolbag.

jppe 02-23-07 05:57 PM

Thanks for all the tips. I think I've got it figured out now. I can now add that to my job resume in case a job opens up where they need a tube folder...........

I noticed the issue about the valve cap as well before I read the tip here. I had thrown away the caps so I just cut some small pieces of old tube and put it on top of the valve stem and the tube wrapped over top is holding it in place.

Not sure if I can properly describe how I'm folding it but it turns out into a really small and nice size. I also use the plastic bags and have put my two patched tubes into those some I'm ready. I might even tote one of the tubes along on our 100 mile ride over to Morrow Mtn State Park tomorrow. Weather is going to be pretty nice here.

Terex 02-23-07 08:01 PM

Why would anyone ride w/o a valve cap? And this "fasten it between your Brooks saddle rails" stuff? I thought that this was the 50+ Forum, not the Martha Stewart Guide to Cycling. Sorry, I'm off to grind off my lawyer tabs...:roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:

Old Hammer Boy 02-23-07 10:31 PM

All good suggestions, and I always use the valve caps to protect the tube. Around here various organizations give away livestrong type wrist bands sometimes. I like to use them to wrap around my tubes. They also come in handy to engage brake levers to use as a parking brake.

Retro Grouch 02-24-07 08:32 AM

For me at least, the hardest part is getting all of the air out of the tube. I usually start opposite the valve stem with the valve on the outside and roll the tube to concentrate all of the air in one place, open the valve stem and force all of the air out. Then I carefully close the valve stem, unroll the tube, and reroll it with the valve stem on the inside. If you're a worrier or an OC type, put a cap over the valve so that you don't accidentally puncture the tube with the valve stem. I use any old rubber band to hold the rolled-up tube.

jppe 02-24-07 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
For me at least, the hardest part is getting all of the air out of the tube. I usually start opposite the valve stem with the valve on the outside and roll the tube to concentrate all of the air in one place, open the valve stem and force all of the air out. Then I carefully close the valve stem, unroll the tube, and reroll it with the valve stem on the inside. If you're a worrier or an OC type, put a cap over the valve so that you don't accidentally puncture the tube with the valve stem. I use any old rubber band to hold the rolled-up tube.

That's exactly what I wound up doing as well. It's a 2 step process-roll up to remove the air, unroll and then reroll into a really nice package. I wound up using a ruber band as well and wrapped the rubber band into a figure 8 so it goes around the tube in two locations.

After doing all this...I'm not completely sold on patching tubes. I'm giving it a shot but it takes a little more time than I would like!!

Retro Grouch 02-24-07 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jppe
That's exactly what I wound up doing as well. It's a 2 step process-roll up to remove the air, unroll and then reroll into a really nice package. I wound up using a ruber band as well and wrapped the rubber band into a figure 8 so it goes around the tube in two locations.

After doing all this...I'm not completely sold on patching tubes.

So how many flats do you get. When I used to get more flats I'd save them up in a box and patch them all on a rainy Saturday. I used real patches with glue and, unless the puncture was right next to the valve stem or right next to a previous patch, I never had a problem with a patched tube holding air. Recent years I've only gotten 1 or 2 flats per year so it's kind of hard to get very upset about just pitching a tube now and then.

Old Hammer Boy 02-24-07 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jppe
After doing all this...I'm not completely sold on patching tubes. I'm giving it a shot but it takes a little more time than I would like!!

Wait until you get 5 or 6 to be patched, wait for rain, have a beer and a patchfest!!

Artkansas 02-26-07 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jppe
It's a dumb question-but who has a favorite way of folding or rolling up the tube so it's neat and "pretty" and easy to use when the time comes? These have the longer stems if that makes and difference.

I just slide it out of the box and wrap a rubber band around it. Works fine. But then again, I never re roll a tube. I am of the patch first-mindset. I only carry a spare tube to deal with a devastating blow out.

routergod 02-28-07 08:20 PM

While this is probably part of another thread...When patching I wrap abit of electrical tape around the tube to hold the patch secure and then overinflate the tube overnight. I think the glue bonds tighter that way. Also the dumpster in back of the lbs is a goldmine of patchable tubes. Call me cheap!


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