Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-29-07, 09:42 PM   #1
dauphin
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
dauphin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: California
Bikes:
Posts: 2,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So I finally started patching...

After a year of intensive cycling....I finally broke down and decided to learn how to patch a tube instead of just tossing it and installing a new one. Did my second one tonight and it seems to be working just fine. The first one is in the rear wheel of my Bianchi roadie and has a over one hundred miles on it since the repair. I guess that means I am living proof that anyone can learn to patch a tube with success! I don't know how long to expect these tubes to hold out...but I figure I can always patch again or go back to a new tube. How many of you have never used that patch kit?
__________________
dauphin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 05:37 AM   #2
BSLeVan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I wonder how many of us thought about answering this post, but didn't want to jinx our next ride.
BSLeVan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 09:10 AM   #3
Nermal
Senior Member
 
Nermal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Farmington, NM
Bikes: Giant Cypress SX
Posts: 2,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I had such a run of flats last year, I had to learn to patch. Old fashioned, I guess, but I do still think bankruptcy is something to be ashamed of.
__________________
Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.
Nermal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 09:13 AM   #4
lighthorse
Senior Member
 
lighthorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Bikes: LeMond Buenos Aires, Trek 7500, Scattante CFR, Burley Hudson
Posts: 498
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I patch. A lot.
lighthorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 09:19 AM   #5
Floyd
el padre
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South East Kansas
Bikes: Rans Stratus, ICE TRike, other assorted
Posts: 1,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Patches are part of bike riding, especially in the country where there are all kinds of thorns to encounter. I try to stay on the asphalt but once in a while one of those little buggers gets on the road OR I get off the road... It does take some time but once you can do it (as you have learned you can) it is well worth the time to have fun with some down time. peace
Floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 09:34 AM   #6
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Bikes:
Posts: 12,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dauphin
I don't know how long to expect these tubes to hold out...
A decent patch should last the life of the tube. I've been patching for decades.
Artkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 09:35 AM   #7
bkaapcke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Next step; wrenching. With a good maintenance/repair book, it's not as difficult as many people like to think. My lawyer skills (lie to it and hope it changes position) weren't working. So, I had to learn how to actually fix the thing. It turns out, that it is not all that tough. The reward; a bike that is always in tip-top shape. That I like. The small downside; a lot of friends want you to fix their stuff. bk
bkaapcke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 10:36 AM   #8
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Bikes: Rans Rockst (Retro rocket) Rans Enduro Sport (Retro racket) Catrike 559, Merin Bear Valley (beater bike).
Posts: 26,614
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
That's what rainy Saturdays are for.

Throw your punctured tubes in a box. Sometime when the weather doesn't cooperate, get yourself set up and patch them all at once. To me, the worst part of patching an inner tube is waiting for the cement to set up. Doing a batch of them eliminates the waiting period.
Retro Grouch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 10:40 AM   #9
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkaapcke
Next step; wrenching. With a good maintenance/repair book, it's not as difficult as many people like to think. My lawyer skills (lie to it and hope it changes position) weren't working. So, I had to learn how to actually fix the thing. It turns out, that it is not all that tough. The reward; a bike that is always in tip-top shape. That I like. The small downside; a lot of friends want you to fix their stuff. bk
You know, even though I have the mechanical skills of a banana slug, I've occasionally toyed with the idea of picking up a $25 Craigslist bike just to practice on and learn how to "wrench." It would be cheap, I couldn't hurt much and if I screwed it up too badly I could just toss it.

But it seems like that would fall short of learning how to repair contemporary bikes, wouldn't it? Haven't the components changed so much that I'd still not know what I was doing?

Kind of like practicing on a 1970 Chevy Nova, seems to me. Would that enable me to work with confidence on a 2007 Malibu, so to speak? (Why I chose Chevys is beyond me. I don't like Chevys!)
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 10:44 AM   #10
AGGRO
Mistadobalina
 
AGGRO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Clairemont
Bikes: Trek Hilo
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
HEYYYYYYYYYYYYY I had a 70 Nova

Wish I stll had it.

I've got some tubes with up to 7 patches on em.
AGGRO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 10:52 AM   #11
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Patch kits? With 3 bikes I seem to buy a patch kit every month. 8 patches to a kit and enough glue to fir them with.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 10:59 AM   #12
Coloradopenguin
Senior Member
 
Coloradopenguin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Delta, Colorado
Bikes: 2007 Specialized Sirrus Comp, 1988 Diamond Back Ascent
Posts: 304
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I must confess I patch!
Knock on wood, my flats are few and far between. If on the road, I'll pull the tube and throw in a new tube and save the bad one for a batch session in the garage.

Of course, if the tire is flat when I'm ready to get on it and ride, I'll say a few choice words, pump it up, and pray it lasts until I get back . . .
Coloradopenguin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 11:41 AM   #13
maddmaxx 
Small Member
 
maddmaxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
Posts: 7,136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Gee
You know, even though I have the mechanical skills of a banana slug, I've occasionally toyed with the idea of picking up a $25 Craigslist bike just to practice on and learn how to "wrench." It would be cheap, I couldn't hurt much and if I screwed it up too badly I could just toss it.

But it seems like that would fall short of learning how to repair contemporary bikes, wouldn't it? Haven't the components changed so much that I'd still not know what I was doing?

Kind of like practicing on a 1970 Chevy Nova, seems to me. Would that enable me to work with confidence on a 2007 Malibu, so to speak? (Why I chose Chevys is beyond me. I don't like Chevys!)
Having built 200mph race cars in the 1960's does not qualify me to fix a 2007 Malibu.
maddmaxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 12:05 PM   #14
Little Darwin
The Improbable Bulk
 
Little Darwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
Bikes: Many
Posts: 8,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Gee
But it seems like that would fall short of learning how to repair contemporary bikes, wouldn't it? Haven't the components changed so much that I'd still not know what I was doing?
I haven't bought a modern bike, so this is hypothesis based on the books I have read and looking at the modern stuff at the LBS.

You wouldn't be able to fix brifters by working on an old bike, but from my understanding those aren't repairable anyway.

Frankly, a derailleur is a derailleur, and you are just as likely to get a difference between models as you are between years (or decades) as far as maintenance.

For the RD, hooking it to the hanger or installing it with a claw is different, but if you can do one, you can figure out the other.

Derailleurs... they align the same way regardless of year.

Each derailleur has at least 2 screws that you should learn to adjust. Limit screws for the high end and low end. Rear derailleurs have another screw for tension/positioning.

Bottom brackets are different, whether one piece (old low end American bikes) three piece cottered and three piece cotterless. three pieces share some similaritiees, so whatever you learn could be used up the chain. I would suggest avoiding the one piece for learning unless you just plan to own one... and ideally find something cotterless. Special (inexpensive) tool required.

Knock yourself out and upgrade a cotterless bottom bracket to a sealed cartridge, see both technologies by performing the upgrade... cost about $15 for the BB, and it will last a long time. Special (inexpensive) tool required.

Brakes, I haven't adjusted dual pivot brakes yet, but many techniques used on older brakes can likely be applied from what I see.

A handlebar now probably has grooves, but probably won't differ otherwise.

Threadless headsets and stems are different, but you will rarely need to replace a headset.

Wheel hubs are easier today than they used to be due to sealed bearings etc... still it is fun to know how to maintain old loose ball hubs.

The rear cluster on an old bike could be a freewheel, whereas most modern bikes will use a cassette. Each requires at least one special tool (freewheel or cassette tool) and to disassemble the freewheel (not recommended) or remove a cassette you also need a chain whip.

So, go give it a try. You will either have some fun and a good learning experience, or know that you want to support the friendly people at the LBS by letting them do the work.
__________________
Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
- Ralph Waldo Emerson
Little Darwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 12:07 PM   #15
maddmaxx 
Small Member
 
maddmaxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
Posts: 7,136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
It can't take any longer than the Diego did can it?
maddmaxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 12:15 PM   #16
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddmaxx
It can't take any longer than the Diego did can it?
I'd smack you upside your head if you were nearby!

The Diego is FINALLY getting surgery today or tomorrow morning. I've almost forgotten my excitement...but that will change soon!
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 12:17 PM   #17
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Darwin
So, go give it a try. You will either have some fun and a good learning experience, or know that you want to support the friendly people at the LBS by letting them do the work.
Very helpful suggestions, LD...thanks! I might just start scoping Craigslist again with all this in mind. My limit will be $25. That makes it fun!
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 12:39 PM   #18
superdex
staring at the mountains
 
superdex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Parker, CO
Bikes: 1x9 mtb commuter, Javelin Boca
Posts: 3,690
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Darwin
You wouldn't be able to fix brifters by working on an old bike, but from my understanding those aren't repairable anyway.
[cough]Campy![/cough]
superdex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 03:01 PM   #19
Velo Dog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Northern Nevada
Bikes:
Posts: 3,802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't throw a tube away until the stem rips off or the patches overlap, so I can't apply a new one. Here in the Land of Big Thorns I averaged a flat every 30 miles or so until I started using Kevlar-belted tires, and once had nine, count 'em, nine flats in a century (five were in one incident, when I ran over a thorny branch, so that really only counts as one...).
For what it's worth, I've had only two patch failures in more than 30 years of adult riding. If you count the punctures I've fixed for my wife and kids, I'm certainly well into the hundreds. One failure was my fault--I didn't have sandpaper and so didn't rough the tube. The other was just fate.
Velo Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 04:09 PM   #20
bkaapcke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Gary, taking apart a cheap bike and putting it back together would do the trick. The key is to keep messing with it 'till you get it right. It took me a while to get derailleur adjustments right. This meant some rides with funky shifting. Once I got it, confidence came with it. This winter I changed (upgraded) the chain, cassette, rear derailleur, chainrings and bottom bracket. It all went without a hitch. Yes, it can be done. bk
bkaapcke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-07, 08:26 PM   #21
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,053
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
I have always patched repairable innertubes, but I have had much better luck with old-fashioned glue-on patches than the modern glueless, which would be alot more convenient, if they worked well for me.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-07, 08:05 PM   #22
Spokejoker
following breeze
 
Spokejoker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Michigan
Bikes: Trek 1500, Schwin Caliente,
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
glue

Let the glue dry.............
Spokejoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-07, 08:48 PM   #23
Stevie47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: paradise
Bikes: Waterford, Orbea, Giant
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I always ride the tubes I have patched, and have brand new ones in the saddlebag cause I've had a patch fail that was in the saddlebag and when I needed it I wasted a CO2 cartridge. Then if a patch isnt going to hold the tire will go flat overnight.
Stevie47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-07, 05:11 PM   #24
swan652
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Central Illinois
Bikes: '01 Specialized Hard Rock, '06 Specialized Sequoia
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Darwin
I haven't bought a modern bike, so this is hypothesis based on the books I have read and looking at the modern stuff at the LBS.

You wouldn't be able to fix brifters by working on an old bike, but from my understanding those aren't repairable anyway.

Frankly, a derailleur is a derailleur, and you are just as likely to get a difference between models as you are between years (or decades) as far as maintenance.

For the RD, hooking it to the hanger or installing it with a claw is different, but if you can do one, you can figure out the other.

Derailleurs... they align the same way regardless of year.

Each derailleur has at least 2 screws that you should learn to adjust. Limit screws for the high end and low end. Rear derailleurs have another screw for tension/positioning.

Bottom brackets are different, whether one piece (old low end American bikes) three piece cottered and three piece cotterless. three pieces share some similaritiees, so whatever you learn could be used up the chain. I would suggest avoiding the one piece for learning unless you just plan to own one... and ideally find something cotterless. Special (inexpensive) tool required.

Knock yourself out and upgrade a cotterless bottom bracket to a sealed cartridge, see both technologies by performing the upgrade... cost about $15 for the BB, and it will last a long time. Special (inexpensive) tool required.

Brakes, I haven't adjusted dual pivot brakes yet, but many techniques used on older brakes can likely be applied from what I see.

A handlebar now probably has grooves, but probably won't differ otherwise.

Threadless headsets and stems are different, but you will rarely need to replace a headset.

Wheel hubs are easier today than they used to be due to sealed bearings etc... still it is fun to know how to maintain old loose ball hubs.

The rear cluster on an old bike could be a freewheel, whereas most modern bikes will use a cassette. Each requires at least one special tool (freewheel or cassette tool) and to disassemble the freewheel (not recommended) or remove a cassette you also need a chain whip.

So, go give it a try. You will either have some fun and a good learning experience, or know that you want to support the friendly people at the LBS by letting them do the work.
Could you repeat that in English please?
swan652 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:27 AM.