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Old 04-18-07, 09:12 AM   #1
abarkley
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Spotted in time...repair advice please

You can tell I'm new to biking - I thought all that jagged metal around my rear rim was decorative. Strangely, Mavic didn't put any on the front wheel....and I can see most of the tire bead exposed on the back; I'm amazed that tire stayed on.

Problems and dilemmas though. This is a really, really ratty road /race bike - cost me $40 on e-bay. BUT, it's my bike (if you know what I mean) AND, I told it that if it made it from London to Paris intact (it did), I'd spare it the dump. A promise is a promise, I suppose PLUS, I've really grown to like the 'feel' of the frame, rust splotched and paint chipped though it is.

I could buy another wheel but the groupset is an obsolete Shimano (RX-100) with a 7 speed (FH-A550) freehub (I guess). I'm not optimistic about finding a compatible wheel. My US biker pal is encouraging me to get a new rim and rebuild the wheel. The LBS will do trueing at reasonable cost - but is this a suitable project for a newbie? Does anyone have other suggestion?
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Old 04-18-07, 09:47 AM   #2
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You will probably need a rim and new spokes for the existing hub. The local shop should be able to do the job for you but it will cost more than the bike did. Rear wheels are more difficult to build than fronts and therefor more difficult to learn on.
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Old 04-18-07, 11:04 AM   #3
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Wheels on old bikes are always a problem, but if the bike is worth it- then a replacement wheel would be an investment. There is a chance that your LBS would have an old wheel that they want to get rid of at a competitive price, but don't hold your breath. Another option is to look at garage sales- Craiglist list etc. for a bike to rebuild yours with.
Or you may even find a bike that is better than yours that you can afford so problem solved.
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Old 04-18-07, 01:14 PM   #4
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LBS Save yourself some greif and most likely some money.
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Old 04-18-07, 03:09 PM   #5
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Is the hub a freewheel or free hub style?? Do you know what the OLD (distance from axle nut to axlenut) or rear fram dropout spacing is?? I ask because hubs to accomodate freewheels are available and if it is freehub style (130mm spacing) then any new hub/wheel will work with a spacer (available at Nasbar) to enable a 7 speed cassette to be used on a 8/9 speed freehub. Inexpensive wheelsets are plentiful.
Good luck....
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Old 04-18-07, 03:18 PM   #6
abarkley
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Thanks for all the helpful comments.

Freewheel or freehub? Hmmm, I did say I was a newbie. I was hoping that a Shimano PN starting 'FH' was probably the latter. But you never know...how can I tell?

I could post a picture if it would help.
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Old 04-18-07, 06:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abarkley
Thanks for all the helpful comments.

Freewheel or freehub? Hmmm, I did say I was a newbie. I was hoping that a Shimano PN starting 'FH' was probably the latter. But you never know...how can I tell?

I could post a picture if it would help.
A the rear cogs of a freewheel screw directly to the hub's mating threads.
The rear cogs (cassette) of a freehub type slide onto a splined hub (freehub) that is itself attached to the hub via a hollowand shouldered "bolt".
Take a look at this site....should help identify your hub/cog arrangement.
http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=48
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