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  1. #1
    Let's do a Century jppe's Avatar
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    Last Night's Time Trial

    I participate (and help organize) the Time Trial Series at Lowes Motor Speedway in Charlotte, NC. We actually have two events this month with the second one the last week in June.

    Below is a graph of my TT from last night's event. I had an "okay" time but it was 10 seconds higher than my PR. My time last night was about what I was expecting as most of my riding has been for the distance events rather than for a TT. After Monday, maybe I'll start doing some 20 mile TT training to get better prepared for the 10 milers at the track.

    Observations from last night's data:
    The Heart Rate stayed up there pretty good-averaged around 176 I believe with a max of 183. I'm okay with that.
    Average speed was 25.4 mph with Max of 30.1 and a minimum of 22.
    Note the drop in speed the last 3 miles or so.
    While the track is relatively "flat" there is a slight rise in elevation on the front stretch and a touch of headwind-hence the speed differences.
    It's not on this graph but my average cadence was 87-that is using a 53 front chain ring with a 12-23 cassette.


    Here is a link to our website:

    http://www.carolinatt.org/
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Senior Member RockyMtnMerlin's Avatar
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    In case anyone was in doubt - you are a strong cyclist!

  3. #3
    Senior Member freeranger's Avatar
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    Had kind of a time trial yesterday. TWL and I were JRA and hear this bark coming from a home (behind us) in the area. Just kept cruisin' along, when all of a sudden the bark is a LOT CLOSER!! Didn't know the bike could accelerate as quickly as it did! Sure wish I'd have had some sort of measurement of acceleration, left the dog in the dust, and he was no slouch either.

  4. #4
    Ride Daddy Ride Jet Travis's Avatar
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    Outstanding! However, I'm reserving judgment til the tests for EPO and testosterone come back.
    "Light it up, Popo." --Levi Leipheimer

  5. #5
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
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    Great ride and time...I noticed that your HR lagged a little. How was your warm up? Here is an article from the Pezcycling tool box on warming up. I am providing the entire article since many times the web site cannot retrieve it.

    We use our trainer versus riding around.

    The Warm-up: Priming the Engine
    Tuesday, August 09, 2005 4:54:39 AM PT

    Never underestimate the importance of a proper warm-up. Often times overlooked, sometimes overdone, a warm-up gets you ready for the effort of your particular race right from the get-go. Following the guidelines below will better prepare you for success at the finish line…

    By Brian Walton

    Before we get into the meat of specific warm-up exercises and their associated heart rate/power zones, first ask yourself these important questions:

    • In what type of event are you competing?
    • What is the length of the event?
    • Will you have a stationary trainer or open road for warm-up?
    • What are the weather conditions for race day?

    Golden Rule
    The key to warming up is adapting the warm-up to the unique physiological demands of a particular race. Road races, time trials, criteriums and stage races demand very different types of race efforts, so adjusting the warm-up routine is crucial to success in each discipline. In any case, a good rule of thumb is: THE SHORTER THE EVENT, THE LONGER THE WARM-UP.

    A long road race may not need a significant warm-up due to the length of the race and the opportunity to gradually warm-up during the opening kilometers of the race. During stage races, on the other hand, you may need to “loosen up the legs” from the previous days’ efforts and a short 10 minute easy recovery spin may actually make the day seem shorter if you are feeling really tight or tired.

    Road or Trainer?
    A question I’m often asked is, “Is it better to warm up on a trainer or on the road?” The truth is it really comes down to personal preference and, in some instances, logistics. What do you prefer and what prepares you better for your event? With experience, you’ll be able to answer these questions effectively.

    Also, because every race course and location varies greatly, you may have to alter your regular warm-up routine to suit the event. Does the event allow you to ride on the open road easily, or is it being held in a busy urban setting? Will you risk disqualification by warming up on “closed” roads? Sometimes, having an indoor trainer will help even if you’re accustomed to warming up on open roads.

    If you do warm up on open roads, consider the following pitfalls: Imagine getting a flat just before the start of your race, while you are two miles out on a quiet country road. Or how about battling stoplight after stoplight in a downtown area while trying to get some “openers” in the legs without getting lost? Whether you opt to warm up on the road or on a stationary trainer, I always recommend starting your warm-up on your spare wheels and then switching to race wheels mid-way through your warm-up routine. It’s always a greater risk warming up on lightweight race equipment.

    Weather also plays a significant factor in your warm-up efforts. If it’s raining, then it’s a no-brainer: bring your trainer and warm up under a building, the hatchback of your car, a tent, or some other form of shelter. If it’s cold, think ahead and add a little time to the beginning phase to really warm up the muscles, tendons and ligaments. In the heat, keep hydrating and maybe cut back on the overall volume of your warm-up exercises.

    Warm-up Routines
    To help clarify the intensities of these intervals I’ll use perceived exertion (PE) instead of Power/HR zones. PE is a qualitative scale ranging from 1 (least effort) to 10 (maximum effort) determined subjectively by how much intensity an athlete feels during the exercise.

    Short Circuit Road Race or Hill Climb
    10 min warm-up at Endurance Zone (PE: 5 out of 10)
    5 min at LT (Lactate Threshold) (PE: 7-7.5 out of 10)
    5 min recovery (easy spin) (PE: <3 out of 10)
    2 min SuperLT (preferably uphill if it’s a climbing race. Note that this is your lower end of projected “race pace”) (PE: 8 out of 10)
    5 min recovery (easy spin)
    2 min SuperLT/MaxVo2 (uphill if climbing race-this is the lower end and into your upper end of projected “race pace”) (PE: 8 into 9 out of 10 for last minute)
    5 min recovery and roll to the line with 5 minutes to spare
    TOTAL: 34 minutes

    Time Trial (< 16 km)
    20 min warm-up at Endurance Zone
    3 min Fast Cadence light gear at 110+rpm (42x17 or 39x16). Stay in an easy gear and focus on leg speed and warming up the muscles; this will also help “prime” the cardiovascular system (PE: 6 out of 10)
    3 min recovery (easy spin)
    5 min at LT (Lactate Threshold)
    5 min recovery (easy spin)
    4 min LT/SuperLT Progressively increase gearing while keeping cadence around 100rpm. For example, progressively use: 53x19,17,16,15 (PE: 7 into 8 out of 10 for last minute)
    5 min recovery (easy spin)
    5 min progressive from SuperLT to MaxVo2. Progressively increase gearing from 53/54 x17,16,15,14,13,12 (PE: 8 into 9 out of 10 for last two minutes)
    Note: SuperLT and VO2 zones are a “grey” area for time trialing. Experienced time trialists will be able to maintain a heart rate very close to their maximum (85-95+% of max HR) but this percentage will decrease to (80-90%) as the length of the time trial increases.
    5min recovery and roll to the line sweating
    TOTAL: 55 minutes

    Time Trial (40 km)
    15 min warm-up at Endurance Zone
    3 min Fast Cadence (light gear at 110+rpm) 42x17 or 39x16. Keep it in an easy gear and focus on leg speed and warming up the muscularly, “prime” the cardiovascular system
    2 min recovery
    5 min LT/SuperLT Progressively increase gearing while keeping cadence around 100rpm. For example, progressively use: 53x19,17,16,15 (PE: 7 into 8 out of 10 for last minute)
    5 min recovery (easy spin)
    5 min LT(1min)-SuperLT(2min)-MaxVo2(2min)
    5 min recovery and roll to the line sweating.
    TOTAL: 40 minutes

    Criterium
    15 min warm-up at Endurance Zone
    5 min Fast Cadence (light gear at 110+rpm) 42x17 or 39x16. Keep it in an easy gear and focus on leg speed and warming up the legs muscularly, “prime” the cardiovascular system
    3 min at LT (Lactate Threshold)
    3 min recovery (easy spin)
    3 min SuperLT Progressively increase gearing while keeping cadence around 100rpm. For example, progressively use: 53x19,17,16,15
    3 min recovery (easy spin)
    30 second “Attack Interval.” Heart rate is not a very good indicator since this is of such short duration. The perceived effort should be 9 out of 10 on the “effort.” Attack out of the saddle, sit down and continue to wind the gear up and hold a high cadence for 30 seconds. Cadence should be 120+ at the end of the effort.
    1 min recovery
    30 second Attack Interval
    3 min recovery
    2 x 15 seconds sprints (approx.200m) with 2-3minutes recovery between efforts Start the sprints from a roll of 20-30km/hr and effort should be maximal
    5 min recovery and roll to the line sweating
    TOTAL: 45 minutes

    Tried and True
    The key to race warm-ups is having a routine that prepares you physically and mentally. Set your watch to the “official” race time so you won’t be late. Time your warm-up to finish about ten minutes before your start. Give yourself a 5 minute cushion to get to the staging area, make sure you are sweating (but toweled off after the warm-up). Sit alone or roll around and focus on the effort, thinking about the desired wattage and heart rates for the effort you are about to put forth, then arrive at the line ready to go. For mass start events queue when called to the line, and for time trial events keep track of the rider 2 minutes ahead of you and line up as soon as they start.

    Last but Not Least!
    One of the things I remember most from my racing days is to not leave the race effort with the warm-up. Essentially, this means if you are able to get your heart rate up (or wattage, if you have a meter) to your race effort levels as you start your warm-up then go ahead and back off, bottle it up, and confidently save it for the event.

    Cadence Cycling website.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    About Brian:
    Brian Walton has a uniquely well-rounded perspective on training and coaching. He was one of the top Canadian riders of the 80s and 90s, riding as a pro with 7-Eleven, Motorola, and Saturn, and winning the 1989 Milk Race and silver in the 1996 Olympic Points Race. He then became the DS and coach for Team Snow Valley, turning it into the top Elite Men’s team in the USA. He is currently the Director of Performance for Cadence Cycling in Philadelphia, and can be reached for comments or coaching inquiries at bwalton@cadencecycling.com
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Geeeeezzzz, if I kept data like that I'd have to stop riding. I mean a flat line does mean you've passed on, right?
    Oh I used to be disgusted and now I try to be amused. But since their wings have got rusted, you know, the angels wanna wear my red shoes. But when they told me 'bout their side of the bargain, that's when I knew that I could not refuse. And I won't get any older, now the angels wanna wear my red shoes.

  7. #7
    Let's do a Century jppe's Avatar
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    Thanks for the warm up info Hermes. I also use a trainer and somewhat followed the prescribed routine but not exactly.

    You are very observant on the heart rate. I'm experimenting with different riding techniques and last night I opted to not go out as fast and hard as I could the first lap (1.5 miles) or so. My performance usually tends to drop off more than I'd like on laps 5 and 6 and last night looks like it continued that trend but maybe not as much as usual.

    I have not had time to look at my lap times but I would suspect laps 5 and 6 of a total of 7 laps were my slowest just based on the speed graph. You can see the overall speeds drop quite a bit in that distance range. If I can figure out to duplicate the first half of the ride in the second half I'd really be happy. I know I need to adjust my training to do that so we'll see if the motivation is there to do something different. Overall the times last night were not super fast so I feel a little better about it.

    I did beat my brother's time (12 years younger than me and usually a lot stronger rider) so I cannot complain too much. On other hand my cycling buddy's time was about 1 minute faster than me and he's 2 years older than me........but his training has been oriented solely at TT's. The great thing about these TT's is it is just you and the track.

    If I have time I want to look at my speeds and cadences to see what gears I was pushing. I know I didn't change but a maximum of 2 gears from the front stretch to the back.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BSLeVan
    Geeeeezzzz, if I kept data like that I'd have to stop riding. I mean a flat line does mean you've passed on, right?
    I keep data like that. That's one reason I enjoy riding. Okay, my data isn't exactly like that (as in I am no where near that level of performance ) but I do keep heart rate, avg. heart rate, max/min heart rate, max speed, avg. speed, elevation, distance, incline, etc. It's really interesting to chart that stuff. It makes me want to go out the next day and see if I can do better.

  9. #9
    OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach stonecrd's Avatar
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    Awesome ride jppe, you would certainly smoke me. Averaging 96% MHR over 10 miles sounds pretty painful
    The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

    2013 Noah RS

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Nice ride, jppe! Much better than mine, but I'm gunnin' for ya. And your brother. Well, only incidentally. I'm really gunnin' for the woman leading my age category, and she's so fast, you two will likely get caught in the crossfire.
    Last edited by VegaVixen; 06-07-07 at 04:05 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    jppe, I read all your post, and at awe at the things you can do with your bike. I don't want to kick myself in the butt because it's no good, but it makes me wish I had pursued bicycling more at an earlier age. Anyhow good luck, and thanks for the post, it does help, believe me.
    George

  12. #12
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BSLeVan
    Geeeeezzzz, if I kept data like that I'd have to stop riding.
    I hear ya'. I get enough of measuring, calculating, documenting, charting and predicting at work. I ride to get away from all that.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  13. #13
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    jppe- I forwarded your post above to my son. We are trying to replace his nicotine addiction with a road biking addiction. It looks promising for now.
    Your TT is an inspiration to younger bikers as to what is possible.
    Thanks for your post.

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