Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

View Poll Results: Answer as many as fits your situation.

Voters
78. You may not vote on this poll
  • Choose all that apply. 1. Pedaling Technique, what's that? I just hop on and go.

    14 17.95%
  • I am a masher.

    9 11.54%
  • I have thought about pedaling technique, but have never tried one.

    8 10.26%
  • I use my clipless or toe clips to "wipe" the bottom of my stroke,

    43 55.13%
  • I use my clipless or toe clips to pull up on the opposite pedal.

    40 51.28%
  • I use some other technique described below.

    8 10.26%
  • My pedaling technique (if any) has changed as I got older.

    10 12.82%
  • My pedaling technique (if any) has always been the same over the years.

    16 20.51%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    50+ Pedaling Technique

    I haven't thought about pedaling technique for several years.

    However, due to a left hip prone to acute bursitis, and lately somewhat sensitive, I did think about it on today's ride.

    I find that if I use the opposite leg to pull up at the same time as I am pushing down with my push leg, it reduces the strain on my hip joint considerably, and, lo and behold, I go considerably faster.

    I have gotten into the habit of mashing.

    Is 50+ pedaling technique different than <50 technique?

    So, what about you?

    Do you think about pedaling technique, or is it something you have never considered or thought about? If you do use a technique, what is it? Or do you just hop on and go?

    Choose as many responses as are appropriate.
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 06-14-07 at 07:58 PM.

  2. #2
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,800
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Circles. I started to vote for wipe and pull up, but though it includes those, the real emphasis is to think about turning full circles with the pedals. The technique follows without a lot of analysis.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Red Baron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    On a Road in Central Bluegrass KY
    My Bikes
    Not enough
    Posts
    1,249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg
    Circles. I started to vote for wipe and pull up, but though it includes those, the real emphasis is to think about turning full circles with the pedals. The technique follows without a lot of analysis.
    Ditto - A fixed gear was my best trainer for developing a good technique. Spinning classes also helped.
    BTW - I only 'pull-up' when climbing or sprinting.
    Also equally important and it helps on a sunny day (WATCH-SHADOW) minimal head/shoulder movement is critical to a good steady stroke rythm(sp?). Training on rollers has helped me develope that aspect. exception again is sprinting/climbing out of seat.

    THINK FULL CIRCLE!
    **Fate is a fickle thing, and in the end the true measure of a person is not fate itself, but how they master it**

  4. #4
    Senior Member freeranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    My Bikes
    06 Lemond Reno, 98 GT Timberline mtn.bike
    Posts
    1,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wouldn't know how to describe my pedaling "technique". I don't use clipless, I use mtb platforms with tractions pins (some call the freestyle) pedals. Definitely better than the "regular" road platforms I had, felt like I gained some efficiency with the mtb.platforms. I think I push down, then pull back after I'm at the bottom of the stroke, but never really gave much thought, or paid attention to it. If I was pedaling one-footed, I'd probably miss from 8:00 to 12:00 on the pedal stroke, but I'm not riding one footed, so by that time the pedal on the other side has taken over. Not as efficient as clipless, but works OK for me.

  5. #5
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, I should have put "circles" as a choice, because that is actually what I ended up doing. It just slipped my mind, but it is what i am doing now.
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 06-14-07 at 10:01 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't really think about it. I just make 'em go around.
    I guess I have no technique.

  7. #7
    Elite Rider Hermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    8,690
    Mentioned
    54 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use the scrap gum off the bottome but when i am really putting out the power, I visualize myself floating in the pedals ever so slightly touching the bottom. No pushing down or pulling up just complete relaxation and spinning.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Einstein

  8. #8
    Grumpy Old Bugga europa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
    My Bikes
    Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
    Posts
    3,242
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was reading an article earlier today, now lost thanks to the miracle of modern forgetfullness (didn't bookmark the thing), but this codger was saying that few people actually apply much upwards pressure on the pedals, even when pedalling in circles - it's more a case that they are getting the foot out of the way of the rising pedal. Suits me.

    Yes, my technique is different now to what it was before, but only because I'm finding out more now. I used to ride at a decent cadence and try to maintain it using the gears.

    Richard
    I had a good bike ... so I FIXED it

  9. #9
    Veni, Vidi, Vomiti SteveE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Republic of Anaerobia
    My Bikes
    Serotta Legend Ti, Romani Columbus SL, Soma Doublecross
    Posts
    3,582
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Where's the <50 poll? Just askin', ya' know. (or did I mean or maybe even )
    "Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ...'holy *****...what a ride!'"

  10. #10
    lunatic fringe Dogbait's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Miles from Nowhere, Columbia County, OR
    My Bikes
    1980 Schwinn World Sport, 1982 Schwinn Super Le Tour, 1984 (?) Univega Single Speed/Fixed conversion, Kogswell G58 fixed gear, 1987 Schwinn Super Sport
    Posts
    1,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I find that the "scrape and pull up" technique works especially well on my white bike.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    4,866
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a pretty smooth technique that has not changed over the years except for a slightly lower rpm. Other riders in the club I rode with always called me a good spinner. My upper body does not rock sideways, nor does my head move much. Wasting all that upper body energy doesn't make any sense to me since I need all the help I can get.

    Of course, on a long and/or steep climb-all bets are off.

  12. #12
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    My Bikes
    Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
    Posts
    7,126
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    +1 on circles with clipless pedals. Sometimes I forget or get lazy or distracted, then when I tire I remember to make circles with my feet and the speed comes back up.
    Can't do it while standing though, then I become a masher.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    S.E. Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    1,737
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I, too, think circles, use clipless, and keep my cadence at about 90 - 95.
    Oh I used to be disgusted and now I try to be amused. But since their wings have got rusted, you know, the angels wanna wear my red shoes. But when they told me 'bout their side of the bargain, that's when I knew that I could not refuse. And I won't get any older, now the angels wanna wear my red shoes.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    My Bikes
    Giant TCR Comp 1 Road Bike, Specialized Mountain Bike
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Baron
    Ditto - A fixed gear was my best trainer for developing a good technique. Spinning classes also helped.
    Another thing that helps me is to ride rollers (clipless pedals and think circles). You need to be really smooth on rollers and "mashing" won't get it.

  15. #15
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE
    Where's the <50 poll? Just askin', ya' know. (or did I mean or maybe even )
    And I am supposed to be responsile for the pedaling technique of the Turks in the roadie forum?
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 06-15-07 at 08:53 AM.

  16. #16
    Si Senior dbg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    My Bikes
    Too Numerous (not)
    Posts
    2,444
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "wipe" is a good image for my money. But this topic reminds me of a similar issue I used to have with running. I had noticed some problems develolping with certain joints on the right side when doing very long runs (20 miles). Then I read an article about the synchrony of breathing cadence and stride cadence (from some high profile ironman triathlete). One contention of the article was that foot strike was harder on the body when combined with the start of an exhale. Their point was: if your rhythm of breathing and stride caused your exhale and foot strike to always be on the same side, you could be asking for skeletal mechanics problems. I developed breathing cadences that caused the exhale to alternate sides on foot strike and my problems disappeared immediately. I also noticed that such conscious attention to breathing cadences seemed to help my performance. It's probably less of an issue for skeletal problems with biking, BUT ..I think I still get some performance benefit by conciously matching my breathing cadence with my cycle stroke cadence in various patterns. Just something to play with on your next workout ride.
    David Green, Naperville, IL USA "The older I get, the better I used to be" --Lee Trevino

  17. #17
    Third World Layabout crtreedude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Costa Rica
    My Bikes
    Cannondale F900 and Tandem
    Posts
    3,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yep, I just go round and round in circles....

    Wait, that didn't sound right.

  18. #18
    Senior Member joeprim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Northern Neck Tidewater Va.
    Posts
    1,688
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I said my technique changed as I got older, actually it changed when I went from clips to clipless. I try not to be a masher, but it requires concious thought to spin. I don't have cadence counter on the bike, but at the gym on a stationary bike I can get to 100 to 120 rpm, but tend to stay at ~80.

    Joe

  19. #19
    Hypoxic Member head_wind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    544
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg
    Circles. I started to vote for wipe and pull up, but though it includes those, the real emphasis is to think about turning full circles with the pedals. The technique follows without a lot of analysis.
    Yup, but I think of it as applying force along the tangent.
    As discussed many times before, one-legged practice helps.

  20. #20
    King of the molehills bcoppola's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Detroit 'burbs, east side.
    My Bikes
    '04 Giant OCR2, '87 Schwinn World Sport F/G conversion, '85 Schwinn Super Le Tour, '92 Trek 820
    Posts
    1,195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Can't say I give technique much thought, except intermittently. I do pull up on sprints/acceleration/uphills, or stand and mash on a steeper uphill.

    I do not understand the "wipe" concept. This is the first time I've heard of it.

    I do remember the old and now discredited "ankling" technique but do not use it. It never felt right even back in the day and I could not sustain it. Just as well as I gather it actually caused injuries.

    I thought riding fixed would make me more aware of technique (that's the conventional wisdom) but at a good cruising speed the bike seems to do a lot of the work for me, just pushing my legs through the stroke with its own momentum. It's one of the thinks I've come to like about riding fixed. If anything, I think less about technique on my fixie...except for a recent ride that found me on a fairly steep, long downhill at 30+ MPH, spinning like mad wondering if my legs would stay attached!

    (And some peckerwood in a pickup behind me had the nerve to honk at me too!)
    '04 Giant OCR2|'87 Schwinn World Sport F/G conversion (6,129)|'92 Trek 820 MTB|'85 Schwinn Super LeTour
    "People who spend most of their natural lives riding iron bicycles over the rocky roadsteads of this parish get their personalities mixed up with the personalities of their bicycle as a result of the interchanging of the atoms of each of them and you would be surprised at the number of people in these parts who are nearly half people and half bicycles." - Flann O'Brien, The Third Policeman

  21. #21
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,800
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by head_wind
    Yup, but I think of it as applying force along the tangent.
    As discussed many times before, one-legged practice helps.
    You think more than I do.
    I don't see that as a problem - for either of us.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  22. #22
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,800
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bcoppola
    I do not understand the "wipe" concept. This is the first time I've heard of it.
    The way it was explained to me is to think of wiping dog crap off your shoe as your foot goes across the bottom of the circle.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  23. #23
    Semper Fidelis
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    My Bikes
    Tiemeyer Road Bike & Ridley Domicles
    Posts
    2,952
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i have always been a masher, just more comfortable pushing harder gears then a high speed spin.

    But now @ 55 and the peripheral neuropathy getting worse I am trying to revert to spinning more, puts less pressure on my feet
    "Advantages Must Be Pressed, Disadvantages Must Be Overcome"

  24. #24
    OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach stonecrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Weston, FL
    My Bikes
    Ridley Noah RS, Scott CR1 Pro
    Posts
    2,170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Circle with wiping motion, although I have not been able to master this 100% of the time. When I do get it right I can quickly tell by increased power and a more fluid motion. Hard to maintain when you are tired and I just have not been able to create the muscle memory to do this consistently without thinking about it.
    The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

    2013 Noah RS

  25. #25
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    My Bikes
    Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
    Posts
    7,126
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    In addition to the circling I find that I revert to pushing with the Knee/thigh muscle group. (this feels like standing up from a deep knee bend.)

    When I remember to think about my stroke I bring in more of the Hip/thigh group (this feels like pushing the upper legs away from my chest as I lean forward)

    Sorry if my explinations have been less then graceful but when I do this right there is more power or much less fatigue. Strangely it is easier to get a good pedal stroke going when I am warmed up and tired.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •