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Old 07-04-07, 03:46 PM   #1
SSP
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How to Change Rear Wheel Without Touching the Chain

http://youtube.com/watch?v=bLb1j4E5oB8

or,

http://youtube.com/watch?v=vxHXreuOL...elated&search= (the different camera angles in this one really illustrate the technique).


Impress your friends, and enjoy clean fingers the next time you have to change a rear wheel flat.

Last edited by SSP; 07-04-07 at 04:55 PM.
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Old 07-04-07, 03:49 PM   #2
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Thanks, SSP. I've been riding for many years but I still come home sometimes with rube-like chain rub on my right calf. I need a video for that.

And, no, the answer isn't keep a clean chain & chainring.
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Old 07-04-07, 04:13 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrossChain
Thanks, SSP. I've been riding for many years but I still come home sometimes with rube-like chain rub on my right calf. I need a video for that.

And, no, the answer isn't keep a clean chain & chainring.
Try to always keep your right foot clipped in, even when you're stopped.

If you need to take a break, unclip and step over to the left side of the bike...your top tube makes a handy seat.
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Old 07-04-07, 04:24 PM   #4
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Excellent!

I've been wanting to see a video on this.
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Old 07-04-07, 04:26 PM   #5
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His bike needs a kickstand.
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Old 07-04-07, 04:56 PM   #6
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Pinch flatted today on a group ride. Key is just getting chain in small/small. Easily done. First flat on my new Scott, and changing Continental tire on a Mavic SL rim was a breeze - no tire iron needed. On my Trek with Bontrager rims and Vredestein tires, it's really, really tight.
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Old 07-04-07, 05:55 PM   #7
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The key is being in the small/small combo to reduce mess.
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Old 07-04-07, 09:05 PM   #8
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Man was that slick, and no grease on his hands. I got some work to do.
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Old 07-04-07, 11:03 PM   #9
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Looks like he still had to grab the reae deraileur to get it back on. Personally I keep a pair of disposable latex gloves in my bag for those messy jobs.
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Old 07-05-07, 06:20 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terex
Pinch flatted today on a group ride. Key is just getting chain in small/small. Easily done. First flat on my new Scott, and changing Continental tire on a Mavic SL rim was a breeze - no tire iron needed. On my Trek with Bontrager rims and Vredestein tires, it's really, really tight.
My experience with Vredesteins and Bontragers is the same-but they don't flat!!!
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Old 07-05-07, 07:37 AM   #11
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That's the key observation. I've been taking my rear wheel off that way for years, you can even do it outside the small/small combination (I'm usually in small ring and the 3rd or 4th cog when I flat.)

Getting it off is easy, getting it back on is not always so. You have to finesse the derailleur into springing back into its down position. Sometimes you get lucky and you can "walk" it down the cog. Sometimes you don't and you have to push it down with your fingers. But all in all, it's better than wringing the chain off with your fingers.
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Old 07-05-07, 07:48 AM   #12
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With a SMUG look on my face I type: "I've been doing it this way for years, but I use a plastic tire lever to pull the derailleur back when replacing the wheel." I learned to do this from a mechanic that worked with a pro team for two years. When you change wheels on the fly like they do, you find all the short cuts and tricks.
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Old 07-05-07, 11:17 AM   #13
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Nice videos..

I love to watch it when someone flats on the TDF and some guy changes the rear wheel in about 2 seconds!

I'm getting better, but I still carry a bandana with me for this and when I drop a chain...
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Old 07-05-07, 11:43 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by jazzy_cyclist
Nice videos..

I love to watch it when someone flats on the TDF and some guy changes the rear wheel in about 2 seconds!

I'm getting better, but I still carry a bandana with me for this and when I drop a chain...
Yeah...those guys can slam in a wheel in no time at all!


As for dropping a chain...that can often be corrected without stopping. If it flops off to the outside, stop pedaling, downshift to a smaller ring in the front, then pedal softly until it picks up the cogs on the smaller front ring. Likewise, if it flops inside, stop pedaling, shift to a larger ring, then pedal very softly until it picks up.

You may also need to backpedal just a bit. This technique works better for outside flops than inside (where the chain can get bound between cranks and BB or chainstay).

I had some problems with chain drop recently as I got my new bike dialed in, and found that I could fix the problem without stopping about 80% of the time.
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Old 07-06-07, 03:10 PM   #15
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Most usefull thing I have found for not getting oil covered hands on a ride is Black shorts. Just wipe your hands on them and clean hands. And it does not show on your clothing either.

I always keep a cloth wrapped round the Tyre levers and as they are the first thing to come out of the wedge, Clean hands all the time.
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