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Old 07-19-07, 04:04 PM   #1
Smorgasbord42
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Long term comfort of Bianchi's C2C geometry?

Stopped by LBS last weekend and rode about a half dozen 2006 Bianchis. Idea I had was to start pretty good (Bianchi Veloce) and work up from there until I couldn't tell the difference. Reality was that the differences were not as subtle as I thought they would be, which is a bummer for my pocketbook.

The bike I liked best was the 928 with Campy Veloce with twin front chainrings (yes, quite a bit more $$ than I started thinking of spending). Store owner says for 2007 the C2C (Coast to Coast) has the same easier on the back/neck geometry.

Anyone with a longer term experience on these bikes care to comment? For 2007, the 928 C2C comes with a variety of choices for components. I personally liked the Campy Veloce set, but for 2007 the choices seem more restricted, and the push toward dual chainrings in front has me concerned. The best configuration is the very pricey Chrous compact. Is Chorus that much better than Veloce, or is it just lighter? Any comments on components too, would be appreciated.
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Old 07-21-07, 05:31 PM   #2
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Anyone? Or, is the 928 just not usually an older person's bike?
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Old 07-22-07, 01:00 AM   #3
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Anyone? Or, is the 928 just not usually an older person's bike?
Can't help you out with Ride qualities- but A couple of months ago I was looking at a New bike. I looked at the Bianchi's and the 928 definitely caught my attention. Well any Bianchi would and does. Spec seemed right- Bike felt comfortable in the Shop on the rollers and the price was right in my range. Never got to test ride it though as I went elsewhere.
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Old 07-27-07, 10:14 AM   #4
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Apparently, "comfort geometries" are a fast growing segment of road bikes. In this segment, Specialized has the S-Works Roubaix and Trek has the Pilot. I'll be test riding those soon, but anyone have any comments comparing these 3 bikes?

thanks again
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Old 07-28-07, 06:25 PM   #5
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As I smugly ride my old lugged steel classics, I am pleased to read that relaxed geometries are becoming more prevalent on decent new road bikes.
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Old 07-28-07, 06:33 PM   #6
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I am pleased to read that relaxed geometries are becoming more prevalent on decent new road bikes.
Consider the organized rides you've been on lately. It's like everyone is at least 40 or older. Young people may be riding, but most I see on the road are at, near, or (Hi Guys!) even past mid-life. "Comfort geometries" have arrived because we Boomers (with adequate funds and expectations for service) have arrived in greater numbers at the LBS.

I'll be looking for a carbon bike for next year. My most fun bike is my criterium geometry bike-- well, up to about 50 miles that is. My concern is how much handling "quickness" and feeling of liveliness does one give up for a comfort carbon bike? There are major handling differences between my quick Sirrus and relaxed Romulus. Test rides in Cow Town here are limited. I'll have head out of town for test rides.
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Old 07-28-07, 06:36 PM   #7
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Apparently, "comfort geometries" are a fast growing segment of road bikes. In this segment, Specialized has the S-Works Roubaix and Trek has the Pilot. I'll be test riding those soon, but anyone have any comments comparing these 3 bikes?

thanks again
Fortunately it is not only the megabucks ($6-7K) S-Works version of the Roubaix that has the relaxed geometry for those who want it. The Pro, Expert, Comp, Elite and standard Roubaix models also have it for thousands less.
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Old 07-28-07, 06:59 PM   #8
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I'll be looking for a carbon bike for next year. My most fun bike is my criterium geometry bike-- well, up to about 50 miles that is. My concern is how much handling "quickness" and feeling of liveliness does one give up for a comfort carbon bike?
Yeah, I'm pondering the same question. I want a bike that smooths out the miles, but I don't want one that turns like a battleship. You can make an educated guess by pouring over the head angle, seat angle, fork rake and trail and other such measurements, but test rides are the real proof of the pudding. I may end up doing the same thing I did 7 years ago when I considered replacing my soul mate Bridgestone - upgrade the components on my Bridgestone.
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Old 07-28-07, 07:17 PM   #9
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I may end up doing the same thing I did 7 years ago when I considered replacing my soul mate Bridgestone - upgrade the components on my Bridgestone.
Somehow this notion grows that a new bike will do it all....comfort, handling, lighter for climbing (no doubt there) and somehow our riding experience will be enhanced. Then I remember the hours and hours I spent experimenting with set up and parts to get the right "feel" and position on my old bike-- and I ask myself "Do I really want to start over?" to get an increase (maybe) of 5 or even 10% in, in, in whatever we call it: The Ride Experience?

After getting accustomed and set-up, I'll jump on the bike and just go. Which is exactly what I do now.

Still..............A New Bike

You'd think by 60 I'd be sensible and grown-up.
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Old 07-28-07, 07:47 PM   #10
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I've become a firm believer in multiple bikes....

I ride my Atlantis and my Klein pretty equally, depending on what mood I'm in and how far I'm going. If I'm putting the miles on, it's the Atlantis hands down. I could stay on it a lot longer than my legs would move me.

But for skimming around the city and when I'm in a zoomy mood, my Klein wins.
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Old 07-29-07, 12:15 AM   #11
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In one of the French bike magazines (I'm in Europe), they compared all these recently, including the Bianchi ... I don't have it in front of me, but they ALL came out very well, just different - Trek/Bianchi/Specialized. Throw in the Cannondale Synapse from the ones you didn't mention, or even the Merckx CHM, and see which one fits/rides the best. The geometries on those vary quite a bit.

I could try and dig out the articles if you needed more info.
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Old 07-29-07, 02:01 AM   #12
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Putting ride comfort on a different slant. Last year I got a Giant OCR3- a relaxed geaometry "Sport" fit bike. I was new to road biking and it seemed OK but I got a new set of wheels to replace the OM set. What a difference, mainly in the speed and less rolling resistance but the hig improvement was in the comfort of the bike.

Then this year I got a Stiff Aluminium bike. To make it even worse I got Shimano low spoke count wheels that are not the most body friendly. No problem as the Top quality C.F.Forks and seat post take all the road buzz away from the harsh ride. Just as a test- I put the OM wheels back on the Giant and compared the ride with the New bike. There is such a vast difference in ride "Comfort" quality with the new bike that I am no longer riding the Giant.

The quality that comes on these new bikes is Tremendous. Depends on what you are after of course- but the "Performance" of a better quality bike over a cheapie is phenominal. And providing the Selection of parts is aimed at Comfort then a test ride would confirm that "Most" new bikes are better at rider comfort than they used to be.
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