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  1. #1
    I need more cowbell. Digital Gee's Avatar
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    Changing a stuck pedal

    First of all, please read "Go ahead, laugh and get it out of your system" so you aren't tempted to respond with the humor my decision to NOT go clipless undoubtably deserves. That's why I created that thread. In this thread, I have a serious question.

    I bought a pair of Wellgo platforms for my bike. I've been trying to remove the existing pedals and can't get them loose. (I know about which way to rotate, by the way). I put WD40 on them over night as well, and no joy.

    I have a cheap pedal removal tool, made by Spin Doctor, which is a fairly short, light metal wrench. I have tried whacking it with a hammer, but ain't nothing working.

    My LBS changes pedals for $30, which seems outrageous for a task that will take them 1 minute. But I can't get mine off, so my choices are: let the LBS do the change, or buy a better tool. They seem to range from about $15 - $25. Would it be worth it, or am I going to find out even with a better wrench I STILL can't get the pedals off? Remember, I have the mechanical aptitude of a banana slug.

    And I have no rack to hold the bike so I'm trying to do this while holding the bike steady.

    I hate mechanical projects!

    So...get a better wrench or let the LBS do it one more time???
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  2. #2
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    I recently had a stuck pedal - it was the kind that used an allen wrench - after bruising my hand, going through a bottle of liquid wrench, and losing a day of riding - I ended up at lbs- they only charged me $5 - so a relative bargain. And it took them two guys and 15 minutes to get it off - so I was not just being a weenie.

  3. #3
    Ride Daddy Ride Jet Travis's Avatar
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    Maybe buy a big-a** cheap c-wrench of the right size. Spray on the WD 40. Let it set a spell. Wack the wrench (in the proper direction, of course) at the far end with a hammer, for maximum leverage. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    If that doesn't work, find another LBS. I've bought pedals that cost less than $30.

    when re-installing pedals, use some grease on the threads and don't overtighten.
    "Light it up, Popo." --Levi Leipheimer

  4. #4
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    Took a piece of 1 3/4 pipe slipped over the one pedal I had off, and let the other end of the pipe rest on floor. Put wrnech on other pedal, and another piece of pipe on the wrench (tried the hammer routine- no joy). two pipes worked. Since you have the pedal on, you'd have to cut a slot in the end of the pipe to allow it to slide over the pedal.

    30.00 sounds pretty cheap, considering your time, the wrnech you're gonna mangle, and the bloody knuckles sure to become involved.

  5. #5
    bobkat
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    When you put the new pedals on go to any auto parts store and pick up some stuff called "neversieze" it's for spark plugs but works great on other stuff, too.

  6. #6
    Senior Member freeranger's Avatar
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    Try PB Blaster on the threads of the pedal. I've seen it loosen things that others didn't. Any good hardware store should have it.
    Last edited by freeranger; 07-30-07 at 08:29 PM. Reason: wrong product name

  7. #7
    King of the molehills bcoppola's Avatar
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    In addition to all the above: "Vibration is your friend", as a wise shop foreman told me when I had to undo a seized bolt. In addition to a good penetrating lube, firmly (but not destructively!) tapping the objects with a hammer to set them shakin' can help the lube do its work; sometimes to the extent that the parts will come apart without brute force measures. Also be sure to allow the time needed for the penetrant to do its work (see instructions on label).

    As mentioned, anti-seize compound or even just grease or oil is de rigeur on nearly all threaded fittings on a bike to prevent this very problem. Also needed on seatposts & threaded stems before insertion to keep them from seizing.

    BTW, for future reference, copper-based anti seize is needed for carbon fiber posts, stems, and/or frames.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Terrierman's Avatar
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    Here's how you do it. First, go buy a new torch....
    It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.

  9. #9
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    $30 to change pedals???!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Holy crap, what a ripoff!

    Sounds like your pedal wrench is probably too short to get enough leverage on the pedal to loosen it. A decent shop would lend you a nice long pedal wrench to do a better job. If that won't do it, the LBS should remove them for free since they must have installed them too tight and without greasing the threads first. I know you said you know which way to rotate them, but just to be sure, you are turning the wrench toward the rear of the bike from the top, right?
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Old School's Avatar
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    Gee,
    Find another LBS -- seriously. I would probably talk to the shop you purchased Ruby from (we are talking Ruby here, right?) and suggest they cranked a bit too hard on the stock pedals. Little help here...
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW! WHAT A RIDE!"

  11. #11
    I need more cowbell. Digital Gee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
    $30 to change pedals???!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Holy crap, what a ripoff!

    Sounds like your pedal wrench is probably too short to get enough leverage on the pedal to loosen it. A decent shop would lend you a nice long pedal wrench to do a better job. If that won't do it, the LBS should remove them for free since they must have installed them too tight and without greasing the threads first. I know you said you know which way to rotate them, but just to be sure, you are turning the wrench toward the rear of the bike from the top, right?
    Ya.

    I like the idea of having them remove the pedals. After all, they put 'em on in the first place! I'm going to go there tomorrow.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member guybierhaus's Avatar
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    PB Blaster or brake fluid are considered the best for loosening threads; although I never had a thread loosen by either. You want a regular automotive type open end wrench. Those stamped steel "bike tool" wrenches are useless. I'm pretty sure you want a 15mm wrench. I can't test for you, because at my age I'm always misplacing tools....currently both my 15mm wrenches are missing. I have better results with sliding a pipe over end of wrench for leverage, rather then pounding with hammer. If you have gotten off the other pedal, you can slide another pipe over the crank arm for leverage to hold crank. Maybe even position that crank arm with pipe against a building/stone wall, to hold it. Although since your not mechanical, you no doubt have no pipe. It's not rocket science. Try a auto mechanic at garage. He probably will consider it a diversion to work on a toy and remove it for nothing.
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  13. #13
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
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    Grease the new pedals when you put them on. Pay to have someone to do it (I know how mechanically inclined you aren't).

    For others, my special wrench is a 15mm combination wrench cut in half and welded to each end of a 2' section of pipe. Its not so much that it gives me more leverage but rather that it provides leverage under control. There is nothing quite like punching the floor when the stuck pedal suddenly gives. You will probably have to grind the 15mm box end slightly thinner to fit most pedals. The box wrench end serves as a good place to hang the tool.

    DG I hope that the Wellgo pedals are white??

  14. #14
    The Grampster tlc20010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dellphinus View Post
    Took a piece of 1 3/4 pipe slipped over the one pedal I had off, and let the other end of the pipe rest on floor. Put wrnech on other pedal, and another piece of pipe on the wrench (tried the hammer routine- no joy). two pipes worked. Since you have the pedal on, you'd have to cut a slot in the end of the pipe to allow it to slide over the pedal.
    Quote Originally Posted by Digital Gee View Post
    Remember, I have the mechanical aptitude of a banana slug.

    I hate mechanical projects!
    Remember, folks, we are dealing with a person who calls changing pedals a "mechanical project."

    Here's a freebee way to do it. Ride to a shop and tell them you want to test ride one of their new <<fill in the blank>> bikes. Then say you want to ride with your own pedals. They should, as a courtesy, put your pedals on the test bike. That's how I do test rides. The lbs always mounts my pedals on the test bike for free. When you finish the ride, pull out your new pedals and say that instead of re-mounting your old (crappy) pedals, could they please just put on these new Wellgos. No extra work at all. I do it all the time. The advantage of this approach is that you get to test a neat new bike. Yesterday I rode a very nice Eddy Merckx and the shop was happy to take the pedals off my bike and put them on the Merckx so I could test it.
    The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    You said you know the direction to turn, but just to make sure: left pedal has left-handed threads and turns CW to loosen!

    I don't use a pipe, I just get an box end wrench and position it on the pedal so that the wrench turns TOWARD the crank arm to loosen. Then you appply pressure by squeezing the wrench to the arm. Less likely to ruin a knuckle, plus you can get a lot of pressure that way!

  16. #16
    Let's do a Century jppe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
    You said you know the direction to turn, but just to make sure: left pedal has left-handed threads and turns CW to loosen!

    I don't use a pipe, I just get an box end wrench and position it on the pedal so that the wrench turns TOWARD the crank arm to loosen. Then you appply pressure by squeezing the wrench to the arm. Less likely to ruin a knuckle, plus you can get a lot of pressure that way!
    BP beat me to it but pay attention to the direction on the left pedal just in case you didn't know!!

    Thrust is another good over the counter loosening agent.

    Does the bolt end have an allen wrench slot an allen wrench will fit into (look on the opposite side of crank from the pedal? You might get more leverage that way-especially with some additional leverage. Ship it to me and I'll get it off...........

  17. #17
    Senior Member
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    What works for me is a 15mm open end wrench and a brass or deadblow hammer ( a steel hammer will bounce to much and not give as much force to the blow). I use a 3# brass and it never fails. No skinned knuckles, no messy lubes. Oh, and if you are dissassembling the bike, take the pedals off brfore you remove the crank.

  18. #18
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
    You said you know the direction to turn, but just to make sure: left pedal has left-handed threads and turns CW to loosen!
    Instead of trying to remember which pedal is clockwise and which is counterclockwise, I find it easier to remember to turn the wrench toward the front of the bike to tighten and toward the rear to loosen.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Thrifty1's Avatar
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    Use the Park professional pedal wrench....... the LBS will probably use this wrench to install and remove pedals.......effortlessly!!!

    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...27&item=PW%2D4

    I have NEVER had a pedal that failed to "yield" to this wrench.
    There is nothing worse than cheap/crappy tools.

  20. #20
    Ride Daddy Ride Jet Travis's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=tlc20010;4969784]Remember, folks, we are dealing with a person who calls changing pedals a "mechanical project."

    Here's a freebee way to do it. Ride to a shop and tell them you want to test ride one of their new <<fill in the blank>> bikes. Then say you want to ride with your own pedals. QUOTE]

    Grampster, you're a genius.
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  21. #21
    Happy Rider
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    You can always change out the crank.

    I know, this is the serious thread. Just couldn't resist.
    Bike to live, live to eat!!

  22. #22
    Senior Member gear's Avatar
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    $30 is a ripoff if you can do it your self, its a great deal if you can't do it your self. Its all relative.

  23. #23
    OM boy cyclezen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old School View Post
    Gee,
    I would probably talk to the shop you purchased Ruby from (we are talking Ruby here, right?) and suggest they cranked a bit too hard on the stock pedals.
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  24. #24
    Riding my bike
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    Yeah - get them to do it (presumably they won't charge you anything near $30 - should be free).

    Having said that, you probably DO want to be able to get your pedals on and off as required. A good pedal wrench (read that "long handled pedal wrench" - leverage is your friend) is invaluable. Also, some way to block the crank from moving wouldn't hurt either. Good luck.

  25. #25
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gear View Post
    $30 is a ripoff if you can do it your self, its a great deal if you can't do it your self. Its all relative.
    It is worth paying a reasonable amount if you can't do it yourself, but $30 is not a reasonable amount. I suppose if the pedals were seriously frozen in place and it took them an hour of steady work to get them off, then $30 might be reasonable. But in all likelihood it won't take more than a minute or two.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

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