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  1. #1
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    Trek Pure Sport OR Trek Lime

    Anybody try either/both?

  2. #2
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    I've ridden both.

    They are very different bikes. The Lime is an autoshifting 3-speed hybrid with a slightly relaxed geometry - the same as found on the Trek Navigator. It rides like a 3-speed suspension-less mountain bike that shifts itself.

    The Pure is a crank-forward design. The crank/pedals are forward of where they normally would be, the seat is then lower and back a bit. You can put your feet on the ground while sitting on the seat. The low end Pure has a fixed fork, the Deluxe and Sport models have suspension forks. You must shift it manually.

    The standard Pure is a 7-speed with rear derailleur. The Deluxe is a 3-speed hub. The Sport is a 21-speed.

    If you want the autoshift, the Lime is your only choice.

    If you like the riding position of the Lime better, but don't want an autoshift, then look at the Trek Navigator series.

    If you want a flat-foot riding position, then go with the Pure, pick what kind of gearing you want and if you want suspension.

    All are easy to ride, comfortable bikes. Target audience is someone looking for an about town/park/bike trail bike for short to moderate (say up to around 20 mile) rides. You can ride them further, but most buyers won't.
    Last edited by Tom Bombadil; 09-08-07 at 09:31 PM.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

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  3. #3
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    More Information .....Please Read and Evaluate Than you!

    After All This I STILL NEED HELP....
    Back to my original question.
    Trek Lime or Trek Pure Sport or Electra Townie 21.
    I want this bike for exercise. Haven't been on a bike for 20 years.
    Enjoyed going 15-20 miles then. Looking for comfort and stability..so
    the flat foot concept appeals to me. Is the three speed of the Lime so
    limiting that I should only look at the Trek Pure Sport and the
    Electra Townie 21???

    Spechs for Trek Pure Sport..and geometry:
    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...ure/puresport/


    Spechs of Electra Townie 21:
    http://www.electrabike.com/townie/


    Spechs of Trek LIme and geometry:


    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...ath/lime/lime/

  4. #4
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    Tom...thank you for your reply! Do you view autoshifting as a minor plus? Major plus? Not a plus or a minus?

  5. #5
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    If you want a flat-foot bike, then the Lime doesn't quite meet that requirement. It is close, but the seat is still a bit high.

    Most people who understand how to shift a bike, particularly if they can handle shifting a 3-speed, would not feel that autoshifting is necessary. But some would-be bike riders are intimidated by shifting. Also some people almost never shift. The autoshift bikes allow these people to take advantage of having 3 speeds instead of 1, without them needing to do anything.

    So is it a plus? That depends upon the rider. If autoshifting gets someone on a bike more often, then it is a plus. But if you can handle a 3-speed shifter competently, then you don't need it.

    If you can handle a 3-speed, or a 7-speed, and you like the ride of a flat-foot / Crank-forward bike (and I can understand why someone would, they have a very comfy ride - I'm trying to get my wife interested in one), then I'd go with the Pure or the Townie. Or a Giant Suede, which is comparable.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

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  6. #6
    tcs
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    I still don't get Shimano's autoshift, with its additional cost and compliction, other than for a marketing hook. Are there really riders who can ballance, steer, pedal and brake but can't shift a three speed hub?

    Quote Originally Posted by jimr View Post
    Trek Lime or Trek Pure Sport or Electra Townie 21?
    Canondale Daytripper.

    TCS
    "When man first set woman on two wheels with a pair of pedals, did he know, I wonder, that he had rent the veil of the harem in twain? A woman on a bicycle has all the world before her where to choose; she can go where she will, no man hindering." The Typewriter Girl, 1899.

    "Every so often a bird gets up and flies some place it's drawn to. I don't suppose it could tell you why, but it does it anyway." Ian Hibell, 1934-2008

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    O.K. After reading a number of posts on various forums, it is apparent that if the choice is a 'flat footed crank forward design' that the Trek Pure Sport has superior components in comparison to the (almost the same price) Electra Townie 21. In addition, the Trek Pure Sport has a suspension front while the Townie 21 does not. So...if they are equally comfortable (I'll soon know) for me, the Trek becomes the obvious choice. Thank you all for your helpful input!

  8. #8
    as I used to be NotAsFat's Avatar
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    If you're going to be riding on pavement, why would you need/want/put up with the weight and added cost/complexity of suspension on a bike? I can see it for offroad use, but on pavement?
    Starve a terrorist - ride a bike to work. It's not just good for the environment, it's good for civilization.

    My new blog is No Pinch Flats.

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    Potholes and ruts are common on pavement.
    Secondly, the price difference is minimal.
    Thirdly the weight difference between the two bikes is minimal.
    Other components such as the derailer are also better on the Trek.

  10. #10
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    You need to get out and do a serious test ride of each of these. My wife bought an Electra Townie this year and to me that thing was very squirrely and I hated the riding position, but others on BF have them and LOVE them. I have not ridden either of the Treks. A test ride is the really the way...

  11. #11
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    I've test ridden the Trek Pure, Trek Sole Ride, Giant Suede, Raleigh Gruv, and Electra Townie crank forwards. I find them very comfortable and easy to ride and would not fault anyone for liking and buying one. That is, if the bike really fit their intended usage. Frankly, if I lived in a city and rode a lot around parks and on busy MUPs, I'd probably get one for that usage. Really nice recreational cruiser bikes.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

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  12. #12
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    Thank you!
    FYI the Raleigh Gruv and Trek Sole Ride are apparently discontinued.
    I tried the Electra and will try the Trek Pure Sport very soon.
    As I said, given the component advantages of the Trek Pure Sport over the Electra Townie 21....IF they are comparable in ride/comfort the Trek would be my choice. If either the Electra or Trek is clearly superior in ride/ comfort...that would have a major impact on my decision, in spite of the components.
    Anyone disagree with my thought process? Am I missing something else that I should consider?
    The weight and price differences are minimal.

  13. #13
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    The Sole Ride was by far my most negative experience on a crank forward. It handled clumsily and was less comfortable. The Pure is a big improvement.

    There are still some Raleigh Gruvs around, I've seen them selling at significant discounts.

    If you want a sportier, well-crafted crank forward, then you could check out the RANS models, but you'll pay about 2.5X to 3X as much.

    Cannondale makes one too, the Daytripper. Higher quality than either the Pure or Townie, but usually running $700-$800. The Daytripper Premium has the very nice Shimano Nexus 8 speed internal hub.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

    There are two types of road bikers: bikers who are faster than me, and me. Bruce Cameron - Denver Post

  14. #14
    Senior Member Fibber's Avatar
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    My wife wanted 'flat foot', so we went back and forth between the Electra Townie 21, the Suede DX-W, and the Trek Pure. By a small amount, the Suede was the most compact of the three, and less of a stretch for her. These are "one size fits all", and the Townie in particular is simply too long for a short person.

    As to the bike style, it is not for me, but my wife seems to like it. Componentry is low end but suitable for casual use. SRAM 3.0 deraileur, etc. Price was $370

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    By the way, the Trek Pure Sport (which is the one I am considering) is a step up from the basic Trek Pure.

  16. #16
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    FYI

    The entire Cannondale Daytripper line has also been discontinued with NO new crank forward design to replace them.

  17. #17
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    The only way to decide on a bike is to test ride. You can have 6 models to choose from but one will stand out- Whether it be the bike or the Shop that has set it up right for you- but one will stand out. Now as to suspension on pavement. It does detract from the ride- taking pedalling effort away and at this price range- It will not be a quality fork. Far better to take a couple of Lbs pressure out of the tyres or get a Suspension Seat post.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  18. #18
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimr View Post
    FYI

    The entire Cannondale Daytripper line has also been discontinued with NO new crank forward design to replace them.

    That's too bad. These bikes are extremely comfortable to ride, and I think would be great bikes for potentially millions of would-be riders, but they can't seem to find anything beyond a small niche market.

    The Daytrippers had high price tags considering that their bikes were slow, comfort bikes. Not that many people are looking for $700-$800 slow comfort bikes. RANS sells at above that price point, but their crank forwards are more performance oriented.

    The Daytrippers were better bikes than the Townie, Suede, and Pure bikes are.

    Specialized offers a couple lines of relaxed geometry hybrids, their Crossroads and Expedition bikes. These aren't quite flat-foot geometries, but the cranks are a bit further forward than on a traditional bike. The Crossroad Elite is pretty nice, with many components being a grade above what is on the Pure & Suede, and maybe two grades above a Townie. Likewise for the Trek Navigator 3.0, which is very similar. I like the new 2008 Navigator 3.0 with the two-tone green paint job.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

    There are two types of road bikers: bikers who are faster than me, and me. Bruce Cameron - Denver Post

  19. #19
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    I've ridden the Trek Pure Sport - beautiful bike, comfortable, easy to handle. I ended up with a Giant Suede just because I liked it a little bit better (bikeshop atmosphere, pricewise, color, etc.) If I'd had the money at the time, I might have gone with the Trek.
    No Electra dealer in town, but Townies are cute.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Fibber's Avatar
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    We had to do a 150 mile round trip so that my wife could ride the Townie. The Suede is a decent imitation. Plus she liked the tourquois!

    Ok, one question for you. Has your toe come in contact with the front wheel on a tight turn? The only downside of the pedal crank forward positioning.

  21. #21
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    O.K. After much debate...research...and yes...actually trying out the Electra Townie, Trek Lime and the Trek Pure Sport...it became clear and obvious as to which bike I much preferred. Forgetting the specs...just sitting and then riding...the Trek Pure Sport was the definitive 'winner' in my personal contest. Comfort and capability were the deciding factors. I made my purchase yesterday...and I spent about an hour cruising around the area. That hour only confirmed the correctness of my decision for me, personally. The Trek Pure Sport handled extremely well, is very very comfortable and has the geometry to make me feel very secure and happy. I'd like to thank everyone, on this and other forums, that helped contribute to my decision through their well considered and knowlegable input. Enjoy riding and keep a happy (and safe) smile on your faces. Thank you all once again.

  22. #22
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    I think that is a good choice. The Pure is a bit on the heavy side, and the styling is certainly non-traditional. Which can be viewed as a good thing. Overall though, it is a well-made, very comfortable bike. I would gladly purchase one for my wife, if she would ride occasionally.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

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  23. #23
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    FWIW, the weight difference between the two Treks and the Electra Townie is nil.

    I am having a great time with my new Trek Pure Sport. It really is a real pleasure to ride!

    Now if I can get my wife (same problem Tom...My wife has never gotten over her fear of falling while riding) on a bike. I think the Trek Pure Sport (or maybe the simpler 3 speed internal hub Pure Deluxe) is my best chance of 'talking' her into trying. In the meantime, I am biking around having a grand 'ole time.

    My bike is so comfortable, stable and easy to shift. It's almost like it was custom made for me and my personal needs and preferences.

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