Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-22-07, 08:49 PM   #1
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Shiny new bike, same tired old engine.

I picked up my Trek Portland on Thursday.

Since this is to be my four-season commuter and grocery-getter, all the gory details are in this thread over in the Commuting forum.



Click the pic for more photos in my gallery.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-07, 08:54 PM   #2
Tom Bombadil
His Brain is Gone!
 
Tom Bombadil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Paoli, Wisconsin
Bikes: RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
Posts: 9,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nice, classy look. You will be commuting in style!
__________________
"Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

There are two types of road bikers: bikers who are faster than me, and me. Bruce Cameron - Denver Post
Tom Bombadil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-07, 09:11 PM   #3
TruF 
My other car is a bike
 
TruF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Wine Country, 1 hour north of San Francisco
Bikes: Specialized Ruby
Posts: 1,304
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was wondering when we'd hear about your spanking-new Portland! Love that color. I'll check out the details on your other thread.
TruF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-07, 09:30 PM   #4
Digital Gee
I need more cowbell.
 
Digital Gee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Reno, Nevada
Bikes: 2015 Specialized Sirrus Elite, 2012 Masi Evoluzione
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That's one pretty bike! Congrats, you're going to have a lot of fun on it. But what's up with no white garage door behind it for the pics?

Seriously, that bike almost makes one want it to rain, know what I mean?
__________________
2015 Sirrus Elite
2012 Masi Evoluzione

Proud member of the original Club Tombay
Digital Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-07, 09:59 PM   #5
Tom Bombadil
His Brain is Gone!
 
Tom Bombadil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Paoli, Wisconsin
Bikes: RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
Posts: 9,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What does Trek call that color?
Tom Bombadil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 01:42 AM   #6
maddmaxx 
Small Member
 
maddmaxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
Posts: 7,136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
red
maddmaxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 05:48 AM   #7
cyclinfool
gone ride'n
 
cyclinfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Bikes: Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
Posts: 4,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nice bike - great color. Us upstaters can't have white bikes, we loose them in the snow 9 months out of the year. BTW - I didn't notice the studded tires.
cyclinfool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 06:30 AM   #8
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
DG: Trek sells this as an "urban" bike, so you get some urban "flava" with the fire escape shot. Plus, I'm too cheap to go buy a house just for taking bike pics. Too lazy too, what with all that mowing and junk. Cuts into ride time.

Tom: The web site called it burnt orange, but the build sheet says sunburst.

MM: Only looks red since you're up so late. Get some sleep.

CF: The studs are still in my basement storage bin. They'll come out, along with the wider fenders, once the temps are regularly below freezing.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 07:24 AM   #9
George
Senior Member
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,376
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
That's a beautiful bike, but I though it came in white, no pun intended. Whatever color I know you'll enjoy it, have fun.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 07:42 AM   #10
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
but I though it came in white
Mine's a leftover 2006. For 06 and 07, it's burnt orange. For 2008, it's what most of us would call off-white or cream, but the decorators call ecru. Along with a faux honey-brown saddle and bar tape, the 08 is quite a looker too.

For the record, the 07 and 08 come with a Shimano 105 50/39/30 crankset instead of the 06's Bontrager 52/39/30, and the 08 routes the rear brake cable a little differently along the chainstay.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 08:43 AM   #11
The Weak Link
Banned.
 
The Weak Link's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Post-partisan Paradise
Bikes: GF Wahoo '05, Trek T1000 '04, Lemond Buenos Aires '07
Posts: 4,938
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pimpin'. You be pimpin'.
The Weak Link is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 12:16 PM   #12
bkaapcke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3,222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I hoope you have a secure place to park that beautiful ride. bk
bkaapcke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 01:49 PM   #13
CrossChain
Senior Member
 
CrossChain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry, I just couldn't take that beauty through the slush and the pot holes. My general run arounder is mechanically sound as pig iron, but looks like an abused waif.
CrossChain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 03:09 PM   #14
doctor j
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Louisiana
Bikes:
Posts: 2,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Very nice looking ride. Appears to be well appointed for commuting and shopping, day or night.
doctor j is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 06:33 PM   #15
speedlever
Hills!
 
speedlever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Rolling hills of Piedmont NC
Bikes: 2008 Trek Madone 5.5, 2006 Trek Pilot 5.2 (deceased), 2005 Marin Novato, Trek 7100, Schwinn Frontier, Trek 800 sport, Trek 220, Trek MT 60
Posts: 873
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I like it! Nice ride.
speedlever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 06:47 PM   #16
solveg
Squirrel
 
solveg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Winfield, KS
Bikes: 07 Rivendell Atlantis, 83 Schwinn Peloton, 94 Scott Cheyenne, 81 SR Touring Bike, 80's CCM,
Posts: 4,926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pretty--and gorgeous color! You do your first commute with it tomorrow?
__________________
solveg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 06:48 PM   #17
RoMad
Senior Member
 
RoMad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Citrus county Fl.
Bikes: Litespeed Tuscany , Lemond Poprad, 1970's Motobecane Grand Record
Posts: 780
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Very nice, but I would hate to ride it on a nasty day. I guess once you do it a time or two it will be okay.
RoMad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 06:59 PM   #18
cranky old dude
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 4,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sweet looking ride. Congrats and enjoy..

Oh, I hope you don't mind but I'm hoping for a MILD winter...one not
requiring studs for a change.
cranky old dude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-07, 07:09 PM   #19
Tom Bombadil
His Brain is Gone!
 
Tom Bombadil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Paoli, Wisconsin
Bikes: RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
Posts: 9,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, Rochester NY gets so many mild winters.

Mild by your standards (and ours here in Wisconsin) would not be seen as so mild by those from Texas, Florida, and California.
__________________
"Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

There are two types of road bikers: bikers who are faster than me, and me. Bruce Cameron - Denver Post
Tom Bombadil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-07, 08:35 AM   #20
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Bikes:
Posts: 12,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital Gee View Post
But what's up with no white garage door behind it for the pics?
That's so 20th century. Fire escapes are the new place to display your bike.

Artkansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-07, 08:46 AM   #21
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
I understand all the reservations people have in this thread and the other one about planning to ride such a nice bike through the harsh, salt-encrusted Rochester winters.

Once upon a time, I had a nice car and a winter car. Two things changed my mind about winter cars. First, it meant I spent six months in a POS when what I really wanted to be driving was the nice car. Second, I noticed all the folks in high-end German and Scandinavian cars driving them through the winter, and it didn't seem to bother them. I gave up the winter car idea, drove my nice cars through the winter, and nothing bad ever happened.

I've been car-free since 1999. My only other choices for winter transport are feet or bus. I remember several winters of standing in snowdrifts waiting for buses that never come, and trying to walk on sidewalks that are inadequately plowed. And I remember one winter of cycling merrily by frozen pedestrians.

Last year I outfitted my $380 hybrid with fenders and studded snows. It was perfectly adequate for winter cycling--if you discount
  • the salt and grit on the rims making the brakes wear them paper-thin,
  • the ice freezing the brake calipers open (Yikes! No brakes!), and
  • the upright position more suitable to ice-boating rather than ice-biking.

After my conversion to road bikes this spring, I put together a list of requirements for a winter bike:
  • Road style frame
  • Drop bars with integrated brake/shift levers
  • Room in the frame and fork for my snow tires
  • Disc brakes
  • Full fenders (or mounts for them)
  • Rack mounts
  • Triple chainrings with 175mm cranks
  • Non-ferrous frame because steel rusts in the salt.

There are no old, used bikes that match those specs and only two new bikes sold in my area that do match them--the Schwinn World DBX at $1200 and the Trek Portland at $1700.

The LBS made me a great deal on the Trek and it's the better bike.

So yes, the Portland is a nice bike, and that's important to me because by both number of rides and total mileage, my commuter rigs get the most use. By my judgment, the bike I use most should be my better bike--that's my commuter rig. And, the Portland meets and exceeds all the requirements I set out specifically for a winter bike.

Yeah, I look at it now, all shiny and new and can imagine how it will look come spring. But I can also imagine how nice it will be to ride all winter.

PS: This also explains why I'm buying a $170 stainless steel rack to put on this bike. It will never rust and it's designed to carry both a rack trunk and panniers simultaneously.

In other words, like the bike, it's the best tool for the job.

Last edited by tsl; 09-24-07 at 09:30 AM.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-07, 08:47 AM   #22
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
That's so 20th century. Fire escapes are the new place to display your bike.
Wow! That fire escape is so much nicer than mine!

Sweet-looking ride too!

Last edited by tsl; 09-24-07 at 08:57 AM.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-07, 07:51 PM   #23
Terrierman
Senior Member
 
Terrierman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SWMO
Bikes:
Posts: 3,179
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
That is one very nice bike. Do you like the disc brakes yet or love them?
__________________
It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.
Terrierman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-07, 08:32 PM   #24
tsl
Plays in traffic
Thread Starter
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax
Posts: 6,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrierman View Post
That is one very nice bike. Do you like the disc brakes yet or love them?
I love them, even though they're still getting settled in. I'm still making minor adjustments with every ride. The LBS says that between the pads wearing in and cable stretch, that it's normal for the first couple of hundred miles. The hardest part for me is remembering which way to turn the adjuster dials.

They're very quiet and very smooth. Control is linear and predictable. I have only 130 miles on the bike and felt fully confident on the Monday Night Small Ring Ride, flinging it with abandon into a favorite curvy descent from a city reservoir. I was able to brake late and hard and still carve the corners perfectly.

On my Trek 1000, equipped with Kool-Stops, this same descent meant planning ahead to brake. Of course, the Portland also handles much better than the 1000. Once I get used to that, I'll have to brake even less on that descent. When I got to the bottom Monday, I wanted to climb it and do it all over again.

Of course, the real test won't be until the wet. There's a chance of t-storms tomorrow, with showers in the forecast through to the weekend.

In a related note, it never occurred to me that the rotors would be steel. Since this bike is to be ridden in the salt all winter, I'm sure that by spring, the areas outside the braking surface will turn as orange as the rest of the bike. (Although now that I think about it, matching rotors would be oh so OCP.)

Researching this tonight, I found Aztec makes stainless steel rotors for just $20 list price. So I'll be adding a pair of those to my winter cycling shopping list, which includes a Wipperman stainless steel chain. I also found out that the LBS has this wheelset in stock, hanging on the wall, for $280. I'm thinking that since I'll run different tires, different cassette and different rotors in the snow, a separate wheelset would make changeovers a lot easier.

BTW, I spent a couple of hours and a half-bottle of Goo-Gone yesterday, removing all the stickers from the wheels. They look much nicer now.

Oh, one benefit of the disks that I hadn't anticipated, is that you don't have to mess with the brakes at all to remove the wheels. I'm forever forgetting to open (and more importantly, to close) the brakes on my other bikes when I pull the wheels. The rear is a little tricky to aim both the cassette and the rotor to the right places simultaneously, but I got it on the second try.
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-07, 07:30 AM   #25
George
Senior Member
 
George's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Katy Texas
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 5,376
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsl View Post
I love them, even though they're still getting settled in. I'm still making minor adjustments with every ride. The LBS says that between the pads wearing in and cable stretch, that it's normal for the first couple of hundred miles. The hardest part for me is remembering which way to turn the adjuster dials.

They're very quiet and very smooth. Control is linear and predictable. I have only 130 miles on the bike and felt fully confident on the Monday Night Small Ring Ride, flinging it with abandon into a favorite curvy descent from a city reservoir. I was able to brake late and hard and still carve the corners perfectly.

On my Trek 1000, equipped with Kool-Stops, this same descent meant planning ahead to brake. Of course, the Portland also handles much better than the 1000. Once I get used to that, I'll have to brake even less on that descent. When I got to the bottom Monday, I wanted to climb it and do it all over again.

Of course, the real test won't be until the wet. There's a chance of t-storms tomorrow, with showers in the forecast through to the weekend.

In a related note, it never occurred to me that the rotors would be steel. Since this bike is to be ridden in the salt all winter, I'm sure that by spring, the areas outside the braking surface will turn as orange as the rest of the bike. (Although now that I think about it, matching rotors would be oh so OCP.)

Researching this tonight, I found Aztec makes stainless steel rotors for just $20 list price. So I'll be adding a pair of those to my winter cycling shopping list, which includes a Wipperman stainless steel chain. I also found out that the LBS has this wheelset in stock, hanging on the wall, for $280. I'm thinking that since I'll run different tires, different cassette and different rotors in the snow, a separate wheelset would make changeovers a lot easier.

BTW, I spent a couple of hours and a half-bottle of Goo-Gone yesterday, removing all the stickers from the wheels. They look much nicer now.

Oh, one benefit of the disks that I hadn't anticipated, is that you don't have to mess with the brakes at all to remove the wheels. I'm forever forgetting to open (and more importantly, to close) the brakes on my other bikes when I pull the wheels. The rear is a little tricky to aim both the cassette and the rotor to the right places simultaneously, but I got it on the second try.
It takes a while to get that back brake to wear in, where it really grabs, but after that they're great. I look for hills and get up some speed and just use the rear to slow me down.
__________________
George
George is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.