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  1. #1
    Senior Member tntom's Avatar
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    Help out a newbee

    I have been riding for about 3 months. I love it. Never thought it would hit me this hard but I love to ride. Anyway I have 2008 Giant FCR1. That I realy enjoy riding. It is a hybrid more road than mtb. I can ride 25 to 30 miles and average about 12 or 13 mph. I want to ride century next year and wander if I have the right bike to do it. I want a true road bike but dont know where to start. I have a $1000.00 to invest but I want to get it right this time. Help me if you can. I am 54 years old, 6ft and 210 lbs.
    Thanks
    Tom

  2. #2
    Senior Member RoMad's Avatar
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    Boy are you in the right place for advice. Some of it may even be good. When I thought I might want to switch to a road bike I borrowed a friends for a few rides to see if I would like it. Then I bought a very nice new old stock (NOS) Lemond Tourmalet on ebay for $660.00 including shipping. I would recommend shimano 105 group set and would look from that point. I think most bikes made of the same material and with the same components are near the same in quality and would try out a few and see if you like any particular model. Another thing you may want to try some different frame materials. I found that an all aluminum frame was too stiff for my lower back. You can try aluminum, aluminum with carbon seat stays, steel, steel with carbon seat stays and all carbon. If you ride where others ride, ask a few of them how they like their bikes.
    Last edited by RoMad; 09-30-07 at 03:00 PM.

  3. #3
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with an FCR1 and as you will find on the century ride- There will be people on bikes a lot less suitable than the one you have. All an FCR1 is - is a road bike with straight bars- Ok not a top end one but a $1,000 road bike will not be better than the bike you have.

    So you have the bike and you have been riding for 3 months. 3 months is not long enough to say you are fully bike fit yet. Get more miles under the belt- or start doing harder rides. Get a few hills in- Get a 4 hour non-stop ride in or get up to 50 miles gradually. You will get there if you train but don't change the bike----YET.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  4. #4
    tsl
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    I want to get it right this time
    Your first bike is supposed to teach you what you want in your second bike.

    Likewise, your first road bike is supposed to teach you what you want in your second road bike.

    Your FCR has done its job. Let your first road bike do its job too.

    Buying new, the $700-$900 range of road bikes are all very similarly equipped. There isn't a significant difference until you get above $1200 or so. In that range you can safely ignore all the stuff about components, and focus in strictly on fit, ride and handling.

    The big three--Giant, Trek and Specialized--all make fine bikes in this range. They're very similarly equipped, but they each have very different personalities. The same can be said for the smaller players too. No one can tell you which among them is the "better" bike. Ride as many as you can, making your test rides as long as you can, then make your best choice knowing that in a year or so, you'll want to upgrade anyway.

    Another route is to buy used. I was lucky enough to find a Trek 1000 for only a hundred bucks (and no, it wasn't stolen). This made it easy enough to not care about components or geometry. I rode that bike for 2,500 miles this year before buying my new Trek Portland two weeks ago. Going really cheap on my first road bike allowed me to jump way up the scale for my second road bike. I had saved all that money in the first place, and I knew exactly what I wanted and needed in my second road bike, so I could buy with confidence.

    I have zero buyer's remorse for either bike.

    Edit: Stapfam makes a good point. I apparently skimmed over the part where you said you have three months on your bike.

    The only real differences between your FCR and an OCR are the bars and shifters. It's probably not worth the money to switch just for that. Save your money and learn everything the FCR has to teach you. Then, when you have 9-12 months on it, skip the low end and buy something in the mid range.
    Last edited by tsl; 09-30-07 at 03:27 PM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
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  5. #5
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    My riding partner is about your size. He just bought a Trek 1000 to replace his old cannondale, paid quite a bit less than $1000. He rode a century early in Sept on it - his best century in several years. A less than $1000 bike will take you a long way. You don't need to spend a lot of money to get a very functional bike. As many have said, get one that fits well and is comfortable - if you want to ride a century next year then start working on the engine.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  6. #6
    Si Senior dbg's Avatar
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    I generally only go to LBS for accessories, parts, big stuff (bike racks, sunglasses, helmets, clothes, etc) since I build up most of my own rides. But I've noticed in the stores that all road bikes seem race oriented to me (like minimal spoked wheels) and I wonder who really needs that stuff. I would think touring setups or cyclocross bikes would be better general purpose and durable rides for 90% of the buying market.
    David Green, Naperville, IL USA "The older I get, the better I used to be" --Lee Trevino

  7. #7
    el padre
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    To change the wording on what has been said...you do not need an expensive bike to ride a century, but you do need a good engine -- that would be you-- so spend some more time looking while you strengthen your pistons and you will be more satisfied with what you do buy.
    peace

  8. #8
    Senior Member skiffrun's Avatar
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    +1 on the engine as being the main factor.

    Train the engine first. "Worry" (fantasize) about a different bike second.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
    To change the wording on what has been said...you do not need an expensive bike to ride a century, but you do need a good engine -- that would be you-- so spend some more time looking while you strengthen your pistons and you will be more satisfied with what you do buy.
    peace
    +1. I just rode my second century (ever) and the second one for this year on Saturday. My bike is pretty much entry level, Fuji Newest, and it served me well.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Terrierman's Avatar
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    I rode my first bike for a year before buying my second one and will ride it for a year before buying still another. It helps to clarify my thinking and to separate what I think I might like from what I really want in a bike.
    It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.

  11. #11
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    I agree with the above posters who say your present bike is plenty good enough for now.

    Keep riding, get as many miles as you can under your belt, don't be in a big hurry to spend your $1000. The right time will come.

    If you can, locate a local bike club, do some rides with them and get to know the riders. You can see what they are riding and find out about the best bikes shops, etc.

    Riding with a club is one of the best ways to learn the ropes.

  12. #12
    Senior Member tntom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stapfam View Post
    Nothing wrong with an FCR1 and as you will find on the century ride- There will be people on bikes a lot less suitable than the one you have. All an FCR1 is - is a road bike with straight bars- Ok not a top end one but a $1,000 road bike will not be better than the bike you have.

    So you have the bike and you have been riding for 3 months. 3 months is not long enough to say you are fully bike fit yet. Get more miles under the belt- or start doing harder rides. Get a few hills in- Get a 4 hour non-stop ride in or get up to 50 miles gradually. You will get there if you train but don't change the bike----YET.
    Thanks I think this is right.
    Tom

  13. #13
    Senior Member buddyp's Avatar
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    I was going to suggest lighter tires but took a look at the specs on that bike. The wheels and tires are lighter than what I ride on my bikes.

    I wouldn't call that a hybrid at all. Its a just a flat bar roadie. If the flat bars dont float yer boat anymore you can easily change them out for drops. All you need is bars and STI levers. Everything else will still work.
    Last edited by buddyp; 10-01-07 at 09:53 AM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member tntom's Avatar
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    The Giant shop says it sets a little higher than a roar bike.

  15. #15
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddyp View Post
    I was going to suggest lighter tires but took a look at the specs on that bike. The wheels and tires are lighter than what I ride on my bikes.

    I wouldn't call that a hybrid at all. Its a just a flat bar roadie. If the flat bars dont float yer boat anymore you can easily change them out for drops. All you need is bars and STI levers. Everything else will still work.
    probably need a front derailleur also as most flat bar front d's are special (MTB) pull ratios

  16. #16
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddmaxx View Post
    probably need a front derailleur also as most flat bar front d's are special (MTB) pull ratios
    Not sure about this, but don't they use shifters that work with road derailleurs on the flat bar road bikes?
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  17. #17
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
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    No. So far all the flatbar series from Shimano (cant speak for the Campy) like the R440/r770 setup use an MTB pull ratio on a derailleur that has an arm shaped to work on a roadbike (no clearance between tire and seatpost.) It is a unique and special application part. The matching flatbar controller (if integrated) will have a brake handle that works with road brakes.

    These front derailleurs can be used with MTB controls and road chainrings for conversion purposes.

  18. #18
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by stapfam

    Nothing wrong with an FCR1 and as you will find on the century ride- There will be people on bikes a lot less suitable than the one you have. All an FCR1 is - is a road bike with straight bars- Ok not a top end one but a $1,000 road bike will not be better than the bike you have.

    So you have the bike and you have been riding for 3 months. 3 months is not long enough to say you are fully bike fit yet. Get more miles under the belt- or start doing harder rides. Get a few hills in- Get a 4 hour non-stop ride in or get up to 50 miles gradually. You will get there if you train but don't change the bike----YET.

    Thanks I think this is right.
    Tom



    I started road riding with an OCR3. That was after 15years on mountain biking and The OCR is the FCR with drop bars- so basically the same bike. It took me 6 months to realise the OCR was lacking in waht I wanted and new wheels fixed that Took the OCR up a mountain and that was when I realised that road biking was OK and got a better bike.
    TSL has made a point- Make this bike last but jump a stage on your next bike- say the $2,000 bracket. Now that will be a bike and look at

    http://50pluscyclist.googlepages.com/newrides

    for some of the new rides members have got this year.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  19. #19
    Senior Member tntom's Avatar
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    What I am going to do is ride. I think for now the flat bars are best. The bike is most likely better than anything I can buy for $1000.00. I will save more money and move up later I realy like the TCR-A1 about $1500.00. Thanks for all the input.
    Tom

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