Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-08-07, 05:44 PM   #1
Motorad
Peddlin' Around Detroit
Thread Starter
 
Motorad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Livonia, MI
Bikes: Legend, Saluki, Trek 730
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is your RPM the same for short and long rides?

What is your RPM average for:
* Around 15 to 30 miles?

* Around 30 to 50 miles?

* Over 50 miles?

I ask to see if the gang tends to pace their energy (lower RPM) on longer rides.
Motorad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-07, 07:02 PM   #2
cyclinfool
gone ride'n
 
cyclinfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Bikes: Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
Posts: 4,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I run in the mid 80's all the time - no matter what the length of the ride. If I am pedaling slower then when I shift down a gear to get my RPM back up my speed increases as well. I will jump into the low 100's when I am trying to accellerate but I can't keep it there for long. I will slip into the low 70's when I am not paying attention and getting tired, if I get back to the 80's I will actually feel better. On longer rides I will stop pedalling every 10 to 15 minutes and stand and stretch out for a few seconds.
cyclinfool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-07, 07:22 PM   #3
dcvelo
Pretend Racer
 
dcvelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Northern Neck
Bikes:
Posts: 1,281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I aim for around a constant 90 except when climbing out of the saddle...the difference between a 15 mile ride and a 50 mile ride will be the gear selection (assuming I'm riding solo...).
dcvelo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-07, 07:24 PM   #4
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,046
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcvelo View Post
I aim for around a constant 90 except when climbing out of the saddle...the difference between a 15 mile ride and a 50 mile ride will be the gear selection (assuming I'm riding solo...).
Pretty much the same here, perhaps 95 RPM.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-07, 07:55 PM   #5
card
Happy Rider
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Texas
Bikes: Gold Rush, Moots compact, Bike Friday Pocket Crusoe
Posts: 749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motorad View Post
Is your RPM the same for short and long rides?
Nope, the further I ride, the slower my cadence gets. I'm not superhuman like some, I get tired.
card is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-07, 09:37 PM   #6
rodrigaj
Senior Member
 
rodrigaj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes:
Posts: 1,126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
35 to 50 mile rides - 90 to 95 RPM

50 to 100 mile rides - low 80's

Hills - I try for the low 70's, but if they are of any distance it's the low 60's

When my feet and hands are cold, I pedal as fast as I can, 100 to 110. Those are usually 20 milers until the snow arrives. I can do 115 on my trainer for 10 to 15 minutes, but not on the road.
rodrigaj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 01:02 AM   #7
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Slowing your cadence is likely to increase your energy consumption because you'll be applying more effort to the pedals. Find your natural cadence, that area where you're legs want to work, and stick to it. If your HR is going up or you're feeling tired, keep the same cadence but go down through the gears (same as climbing a hill) - you'll be slower but you'll last longer.

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:19 AM   #8
stonecrd
OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach
 
stonecrd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Weston, FL
Bikes: Ridley Noah RS, Scott CR1 Pro
Posts: 2,170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Same all of the time 85-90rpm. If I find myself getting down to 80 I shift, if I hit 95 I shift.
__________________
The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

2013 Noah RS
stonecrd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 06:30 AM   #9
jppe
Let's do a Century
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Bikes: Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Cervelo P2C/Duraace
Posts: 6,535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
For me, it's more dependent on the amount of climbing versus the distance. My cadence range is 80-95 (like Stonecrd's) on flat to rolling hills with overall average around 85. For climbing rides go figure.......I've seen my cadence drop to less than 50 on really steep hills late in a ride. Looking back at Training Center my average cadence for 9500 ft of climbing in 102 miles was 77-that only factors in the time you're actually pedaling and does not include the mile of coasting.
jppe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:31 AM   #10
Jet Travis
Ride Daddy Ride
 
Jet Travis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Villa Incognito
Bikes: 1983 Trek 720; 1983 Trek 620; 1989 Gi Cannondale Bad Boy Ultra; LeMond Victoire; Bike Friday Pocket Rocket Pro
Posts: 2,648
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jppe, when I'm going up the hills around here, any cadence is a good cadence.
__________________
"Light it up, Popo." --Levi Leipheimer
Jet Travis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:33 AM   #11
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Bikes: Rans Rockst (Retro rocket) Rans Enduro Sport (Retro racket) Catrike 559, Merin Bear Valley (beater bike).
Posts: 26,614
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Nope, not by a mile.

My cadence bounces all over the place even on fairly short rides. I think that I've got attention deficite disorder. I find that I have to concentrate to maintain a steady cadence. Even a cadence that's easily within my physical ability. For pretty much the same reason I avoid pace lines because I find they require more concentration than I want to maintain for very long.
Retro Grouch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:41 AM   #12
ZeroPt99
My bike is total crap
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Bikes: It's a serious piece of crap. Really. I'm not kidding.
Posts: 140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Do you all have computers with cadence monitors? Is that the only way to get said information?
ZeroPt99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:21 AM   #13
Louis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 4,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm usually pretty smooth throughout a ride. If I get really tired late in a long ride, I suspect it drops some.
Louis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:28 AM   #14
howsteepisit
Senior Member
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,671
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
For me, up to 50 miles its 85-90 rpm. On longer rides I drop off a bit to 80-85. ills are in the 70-80 range, depending on the hill and just how much attention I want to pay to the cadence monitor. I use a Garmin 305 to keep track.
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 11:51 AM   #15
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
My cadence won't vary much on rides- except on hills. I will drop down to around 80 on my normal rides but the longer the ride- the steeper the hill seems and the cadence will drop. Possibly to around 65 at the worst- but on the Tandem we lost Granny once and did the hills in middle ring. Surprising how much effort goes into a cadence of 50 to keep going up the slopes.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:28 PM   #16
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroPt99 View Post
Do you all have computers with cadence monitors? Is that the only way to get said information?
All you need is a computer with a time read out.
A cadence of 90 works out to 15 pedal strokes over 10 seconds.
All you have to do is wait for an even ten to come up on the computer and start counting pedal strokes - you can then return your attention to the road (some consider watching where you are going a useful safety device). When you reach a count of 13, glance down at your computer - if you've reached the next ten seconds, you know you're pedalling below 90, if you're well short of the ten, you know you're over 90.

Of course, this works with any cadence, you've just got to know the number you're aiming at and that's what you're doing, you're not computing the actual cadence you're doing, you're aiming at a particular cadence (or just observing trends). Saves all that mental arithmatic.

It works well ... but I prefer my Polar CS200

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-07, 07:41 AM   #17
ZeroPt99
My bike is total crap
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Bikes: It's a serious piece of crap. Really. I'm not kidding.
Posts: 140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Good tip, thanks
ZeroPt99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-07, 08:00 AM   #18
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy
Posts: 6,013
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motorad View Post
What is your RPM average for:
* Around 15 to 30 miles?

* Around 30 to 50 miles?

* Over 50 miles?

I ask to see if the gang tends to pace their energy (lower RPM) on longer rides.
So your real question is about pacing energy on longer rides, not about cadence. Yeah, cadence is a result of good pedal form. If its a result of selecting an easier gear, then I think its secondary to form. Form comes first. The experienced rider has a good upstroke. This takes the pressure off the quads.

A newbie or someone who's been riding platform pedals will have to rely on easier gears and thus higher cadence. For them, I think the pacing of energy on longer rides has to be rest stops. Consider a typical organized century ride, there's several rest stops with fluids and food and stuff.
Garfield Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-07, 08:56 AM   #19
SoonerBent
<><
 
SoonerBent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oklahoma City
Bikes: RANS Tailwind
Posts: 768
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motorad View Post
What is your RPM average for:
* Around 15 to 30 miles?

* Around 30 to 50 miles?

* Over 50 miles?

I ask to see if the gang tends to pace their energy (lower RPM) on longer rides.
I do change according to ride length. On shorter rides I'll turn 100 to 115. Centuries I turn 90 to 100.
SoonerBent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-07, 09:08 AM   #20
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerBent View Post
I do change according to ride length. On shorter rides I'll turn 100 to 115. Centuries I turn 90 to 100.
You sir, are a freak, and I mean that in the nicest possible way. I can pull some pretty impressive cadences spinning up hills (average 90+) and when I'm on the fixed gear bike, I ain't got no choice going down said hills (140 isn't unusual), but pulling those cadences on a geared bike as normal? Man, can I borrow your quads some time?

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:28 AM.