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  1. #1
    Pedaled too far. Artkansas's Avatar
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    How do you get up to speed?

    In training for my first century, hopefully the Joe Weber Arky 100, I've been looking a little more at my pacing. It seems like if I begin breathing more rapidly than I need to, that the speed of my legs picks up after a short while.

    How do you get yourself up to your max pedaling speed?

  2. #2
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    I spin for 15 minutes and then I start hitting it pretty good. If I know I'm going to go distance, I just take it easy. I have a HRM and if I keep my heart rate between 125 and 130 I found I could just about go all day.
    George

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    Ride Daddy Ride Jet Travis's Avatar
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    I've ridden a number of centuries and have found that a steady, comfortable pace that I can maintain hour after hour is more important than max pedaling speed. In fact, I don't even know what my pedaling speed is.
    "Light it up, Popo." --Levi Leipheimer

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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet Travis View Post
    I've ridden a number of centuries and have found that a steady, comfortable pace that I can maintain hour after hour is more important than max pedaling speed. In fact, I don't even know what my pedaling speed is.
    Pacing myself was the only way I was able to complete a double century. The leader of our intrepid little 4-man group insisted on metering out a steady pace of 16 to 17 miles for every hour in the saddle, and we finished in 12:18 after slowing a bit towards the end and on a couple of climbs along the way.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
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    I never pay much attention to cadence or heart rate, because I can feel when the engine is running at maximum efficiency. On any long ride, I try to keep anaerobic activity at minimum until later in the day.
    Last edited by Louis; 10-11-07 at 07:40 AM.

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    Senior Member big john's Avatar
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    It takes a while to get to that smooth spin. Sometimes I do the same thing, concentrate on deep breathing, or sometimes I think about my form, concentrate on the spin itself, especially if I'm hurting.

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    Take as long as you need to get warmed up and comfortable. In fact, go as slow as you can stand it for the first 15 or 20 minutes. Nothing's worse than hammering the minute you feel OK.

    And do "negative splits." The first half of a long ride should be slower than the second half.
    Last edited by Big Paulie; 10-11-07 at 01:06 AM.

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    Senior Member rodrigaj's Avatar
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    This is my routine for serious training rides, where I plan on doing Zone 4 - 5 intervals:

    1- 10min on my Ellipitical for warm up.
    2- Complete body stretches from Bob Anderson's Stretching Book.
    3- As many pushups as I can do.
    4- As many situps as I can do. (I really hate these )
    On Bike:
    5- 15 min, Zone 2 - 3, 90rpm
    6- Start intervals, usually 15 min, Zone 4-5, then 15 min, Zone 2-3, both in the 90's rpm
    7- Repeat intervals until I've done about 1 hour to 2 hours worth, depending on how I feel.
    8- Finish ride with a zone 1 - 2 cool down.

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    OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach stonecrd's Avatar
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    I will generally start out in my 39 ring and spin for the first 1-1.5 miles then I am ready to push hard. As for long distance pacing it really depends on how much you will be in the front. If you are solo you need to pick a good tempo that you feel you can hold and vary gearing depending on wind direction, hills etc. I do not try to keep constant speed but constant power. If you are riding with a bigger group then your pace can be faster since you will be on the front less.

    For me keep a constant tempo is important, slowing down and then speeding up to catch gaps really takes a toll.
    The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

    2013 Noah RS

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    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
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    To bring my pedaling speed up I move my feet faster. To make it through a long ride I start easy and once warmed up, try to maintain a moderate effort. I try to take advantage of easy speed opportunities to move down the road quickly with minimal effort. I try not to make many all out efforts on a long ride. Use energy when it helps the most. Conserve energy when I can. I don't concentrate on spin any more than normal.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

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    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
    In training for my first century, hopefully the Joe Weber Arky 100, I've been looking a little more at my pacing. It seems like if I begin breathing more rapidly than I need to, that the speed of my legs picks up after a short while.

    How do you get yourself up to your max pedaling speed?

    You're training for a century and that's a specific goal. If its an organized century, you will have several rest stops with nutrition, hydration. Some organized century's dont have it all. If it's a solo century then its different than a group century, even a small group.

    You're asking for a specific element in training...pedal speed. But I think you need to keep in mind of your goal, the century and what that requires: conditioning, hydration, nutrition.

    If your bike has platform pedals, then you'll train differently than with a road bike with clipless pedals. With clipless the pedal stroke comes first, then the speed will follow.

  12. #12
    Senior Member RockyMtnMerlin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodrigaj View Post
    This is my routine for serious training rides, where I plan on doing Zone 4 - 5 intervals:

    1- 10min on my Ellipitical for warm up.
    2- Complete body stretches from Bob Anderson's Stretching Book.
    3- As many pushups as I can do.
    4- As many situps as I can do. (I really hate these )
    On Bike:
    5- 15 min, Zone 2 - 3, 90rpm
    6- Start intervals, usually 15 min, Zone 4-5, then 15 min, Zone 2-3, both in the 90's rpm
    7- Repeat intervals until I've done about 1 hour to 2 hours worth, depending on how I feel.
    8- Finish ride with a zone 1 - 2 cool down.
    Whoa! Serious warm up dude. But, I'll bet you that it works well.

  13. #13
    Pedaled too far. Artkansas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
    You're asking for a specific element in training...pedal speed. But I think you need to keep in mind of your goal, the century and what that requires: conditioning, hydration, nutrition.
    Yes. It's a specific question. I've asked other questions in this and other forums. And gone out for a number of training rides, and am working on pushing myself more in my daily riding. I've learned a lot about water and food.

    I know I can go the distance, but I'm trying to get my speed up more because it still seems a bit slow. I've always tended to be a relaxed rider, but now I need to hit a goal time.

    I noticed that I seem to hit a wall and that my pedal speed seems to level off, I get distracted, it drops, and I noticed that if started breathing harder than I needed for my pedal speed, that my speed seemed to go up a little. So I was interested in how others got their revs up. But the answers I'm getting are interesting and educational as well.

  14. #14
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Just got the heart monitor working again but it can be done without it. I havre a lot of slopes before I get to the hills and I use them to progressively push the HR up. First slope and I get to 120. Not a problem but this is just enough to have to breath a bit hard and on cold legs- I feel them. Next slope and I get to 130- then calm down to about 110. next slope and it is 140 andf I feel this one. Than slow down till comfortable at 120. Then finally I get to 150. Breathing hard- legs a bit leaden and I don't want to do much more. Then I slow down till I am completely comfortable. I can then ride all day at around 130- 135 (Although it may be a bit lower on the road bike) I can push to 150 on the hills and even get to my max of 165 on the final bit of the hills.

    If I do not do this "Warm Up"- then I will struggle to get to 135 and be comfortable. Only takes a couple of miles to do it in- but even on longer rides- or organised ones-I stick to the same routine. It works for me.
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    Speed is overrated, or so I have been told!

  16. #16
    Senior Member big john's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
    Yes. It's a specific question. I've asked other questions in this and other forums. And gone out for a number of training rides, and am working on pushing myself more in my daily riding. I've learned a lot about water and food.

    I know I can go the distance, but I'm trying to get my speed up more because it still seems a bit slow. I've always tended to be a relaxed rider, but now I need to hit a goal time.

    I noticed that I seem to hit a wall and that my pedal speed seems to level off, I get distracted, it drops, and I noticed that if started breathing harder than I needed for my pedal speed, that my speed seemed to go up a little. So I was interested in how others got their revs up. But the answers I'm getting are interesting and educational as well.
    If you want to increase your overall speed, the best way to do that is to ride with faster riders.

  17. #17
    OnTheRoad or AtTheBeach stonecrd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big john View Post
    If you want to increase your overall speed, the best way to do that is to ride with faster riders.
    This is true, when your trying to hang with guys going 28+mph you can handle 20 easy even when you get shelled out the back. Really though cadence is a lot about muscle memory. When I started I had to concentrate to maintain 85rpm now 85 is just my natural spin rate and I have to concentrate to keep things at 95 until my muscles kind of do it on their own. Speed also drives your cadence up as you have to get and hold 95+ rpm in big gears in a fast ride. While I know a lot of people here don't care about going fast the best times I have had on a bike are in the middle of a 40 person pelaton going 30mph in my 53/12, its a blast!
    The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard and the shallow end is much too large

    2013 Noah RS

  18. #18
    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artkansas View Post
    In training for my first century, hopefully the Joe Weber Arky 100, I've been looking a little more at my pacing. It seems like if I begin breathing more rapidly than I need to, that the speed of my legs picks up after a short while.

    How do you get yourself up to your max pedaling speed?
    I get myself to max pedal speed by concentrating on the fundamentals of the pedal stroke. The most common "fault" is to pay less attention to the upstroke. With quick upstrokes, the pedal speed will increase automatically.

    I practice the upstroke as much as possible. I'll change to the big ring and make the upstroke an exaggerated pull. I'll feel the hamstrings and glues take the tension. Then when I switch to the small ring, I will get that pedal speed up.

    This helps when I'm on a training ride by myself and I will naurally fall into a lull and drop off the speed.

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