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Old 10-12-07, 09:13 PM   #1
Yen
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3 hours in the bike shop

We stopped at the LBS to pick up a replacement tube for my bike. We figured we'd check out a bike or two while we were there.

I rode a Roubaix and liked it a LOT (color = "brushed" which is really a beautiful silvery color, very sleek). I sat on a Cannondale Synapse but it was too small for me.

He showed me a road bike with bullhorn bars, and another one with standard drop bars. He wanted to know which one felt more comfortable to me, more comfortable for my hands.

I really liked the bullhorn bars..... does anyone have them and like them? They were like these, but taped:


He also presented another type of bar off the rack, and I can't remember the name. Similar to the bullhorns but the bar ends were straight and the area in the middle (where you'd put your hands if they weren't on the ends) was a little flattened in the center like some ergo grips are shaped. I don't remember the name of that one.... does it sound familiar to anyone?

He spent a LOT of time with us. He said this store emphasizes the importance of fittings and will not sell the bike without making sure it fits me. This store also offers 2 years free unlimited service. (Is all of this too good to be true??? Why do I always feel that I'm being manipulated into a sale when that stuff is pointed out?)

They didn't have any other relaxed geometry road bikes in my size. He agreed that I should try both WSD and men's just to be sure of the fit.

Though it was a tiny bit too long for me, that Roubaix is a very nice bike.
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Old 10-12-07, 09:39 PM   #2
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That LBS does sound to good to be true, but I'd sure talk to them some more...you never know, you may have found the end of the rainbow there. I can't help you on the bar questions, but my Sequoia is the brushed finish and I really like it.
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Old 10-13-07, 01:01 AM   #3
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Which LBS is it? If I may ask, without being too nosey. I live in So Cal and am always on the lookout for good shops...

Last edited by Big Paulie; 10-13-07 at 01:12 AM.
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Old 10-13-07, 02:49 AM   #4
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This might be one of the configurations that you were looking at. The bar is a Profile Design T2 wing which is indeed flat across the top. It is the setup that I returned to after the foray into full aerobar clipons. For all practical purposes it is the upper half of a road drop bar minus the drops.

I use this because the brake position fits my hands more comfortably than the traditional vertical position found on the typical road drop bar. The most difficult part of this bar is finding a shop that can figure out how to mount the controls. Many assume that it can't be done.

On this one you are looking at Dura Ace bar end shifters in the ends of the bars with Tektro 24mm (this diameter is important and is not generally avaible as 26mm and 31.8mm are considered standard) Cyclocross brake levers clamped around the end of the bar. The brakes have to be angled slightly out and the shifters angled slightly in so the cables can run side by side under the tape.

There is an even more elegant way of doing this but it involves 2 $90 each brake levers from HED that attach to the shifter.

Others may mount the cyclocross levers on the center section of the bar in a location similar to that found on an MTB. If you stay away from the wing bar and get a round bullhorn bar then I believe Shimano Flatbar road controls (shifter and brake handle) will fit but that would have to be measured or seen before committing to it.

Last edited by maddmaxx; 03-30-08 at 06:55 AM.
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Old 10-13-07, 03:01 AM   #5
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You may have found a winner of a shop.

At the shop here I bought mine (and where ang1sgt works) they don't even let you test ride one without doing a fitting first.

Shops like these are hard to find. Stick with them, no matter what sort of bike people recommend on teh forums.
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Old 10-13-07, 06:21 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yen View Post
...
He showed me a road bike with bullhorn bars, and another one with standard drop bars. He wanted to know which one felt more comfortable to me, more comfortable for my hands.

I really liked the bullhorn bars..... does anyone have them and like them? ...
Although I do not have bullhorns, my mountain bike's conventional straight bars with straight perpendicular exensions should provide a similar riding experience. I like them, but I strongly prefer regular drops on my road bikes. Bullhorns provide two different hand positions, one of which puts the forearm in the neutral handshake axial rotation, but drops provide five, four of which are neutral.
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Old 10-13-07, 06:30 AM   #7
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Went in to buy a tube and left with a $2000 bike? It works for me.
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Old 10-13-07, 06:48 AM   #8
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Re: bullhorn bars. As they're set up in these parts, you've really got to stretch out to reach the brakes. I wouldn't find that comfortable.
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Old 10-13-07, 07:05 AM   #9
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Bullhorns are popular with young fixed gear riders for some reason. So if you're looking to impress a younger man...

Otherwise, I think JohnE sums it up well.
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Old 10-13-07, 07:09 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
Although I do not have bullhorns, my mountain bike's conventional straight bars with straight perpendicular exensions should provide a similar riding experience. I like them, but I strongly prefer regular drops on my road bikes. Bullhorns provide two different hand positions, one of which puts the forearm in the neutral handshake axial rotation, but drops provide five, four of which are neutral.
What are the other "3"
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Old 10-13-07, 08:00 AM   #11
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Before thinking about "Funny" bars- Try the conventional bars that 99.9% of other bikers use. For some reason they are popular. Saying that- I was on Flat bars on the MTB for around 10 years and then the Writeups in the magazines started to rave about the new form of riser bars. I am a conventional-old style rider and it was a couple of years before I tried these new fangled bars and I only tried them to see if they would cure a problem I was having. They worked and not only cured the problem- I now conformed with most other bikes on the trails and was no longer regarded as Old School.
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Old 10-13-07, 08:09 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yen View Post
He showed me a road bike with bullhorn bars, and another one with standard drop bars. He wanted to know which one felt more comfortable to me, more comfortable for my hands.

I really liked the bullhorn bars..... does anyone have them and like them? They were like these, but taped:
I've never ridden with bullhorn bars so help me out. They don't look much different to me than a set of standard road bars with the hooks cut off. What am I missing?
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Old 10-13-07, 08:40 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Big Paulie View Post
Which LBS is it? If I may ask, without being too nosey. I live in So Cal and am always on the lookout for good shops...
+1
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Old 10-13-07, 08:50 AM   #14
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I've never ridden with bullhorn bars so help me out. They don't look much different to me than a set of standard road bars with the hooks cut off. What am I missing?
That's almost exactly what they are. Most will put the upswept part right where the hoods would be on a drop bar.
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Old 10-13-07, 01:05 PM   #15
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Somewhat related, somewhat of a thread hijack (sorry), but it's about a great store like Yen has found.

In our town we have two great shops like that. I just spent maybe 8 hours over the past week with my son, shopping for a bike for him. The shop we went to did a careful fitting, listened to his cycling goals as well as his history and showed him a range of bikes that would fit him and support his goals. I was prepared to buy him a certain level of bike (suitable as an entry-level racer) as one of two bikes I am buying (one for my son, one for my daughter) to reward my kids for getting me back into cycling after a 12-year layoff. He opted to add his own money and go a level higher and the store made him a great deal and even helped him with some shoes he'd gotten elsewhere that were defective. That is service. My son gets a number of free minor tuneups and a major one, but I know the store and if he needs more they will help him out. It is the same store I did my business with long ago (a lot of business, as a matter of fact) and the manager now is the same guy I used to deal with back then so we had a little catching up to do. A good time was had by all! Now I need to get my daughter into the store...

Buying bikes for your kids is even more fun than buying one for yourself. Trust me!

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