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Old 12-29-07, 12:55 PM   #1
Motorad
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Tips for Propping Bikes Without Kickstands

So, when a tree or building is available, you could lean your bike against it, but you should engage one of the brakes so the bike doesn't roll.

What are some good tips about keeping your bike off the ground, when you're not straddling it? In a previous life as an Army medic, it was common to use "blousing rubbers" on your military pants. You would "blouse" your pant cuff with these short elastic bands with tiny hooks on their ends, so that the pants look like they're tucked in your boots. The point being something like elastic bands to press the rear brake lever towards the handlebar?

What do you use to anchor the (front or back?) brake lever ... and are there any other tips for propping bikes without kickstands?
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Old 12-29-07, 01:16 PM   #2
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I carry a small 10 inch strip of Velcro (two-sided) to use for emergency strapping of things. It can be used to hold a brake lever in or to strap the front wheel to the down tube so the bike doesn't roll of the wheel turn. There used to be a device called (I believe) the Flickstand that would do the same thing with the front wheel. Don't know if it's even made any longer. But the Velcro works well.
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Old 12-29-07, 02:16 PM   #3
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This thread strikes me as being equivalent to one on "how to keep warm in the snow without wearing a coat."
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Old 12-29-07, 02:18 PM   #4
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Cut across an old inner tube somewhere, then cut it again about 5/8"--3/4" away so you have a nice "rubber band" the diameter of the tube. This works best for a 700-25 size tube, as bigger ones might be too long.

Then use it slipped over the curved part of the drop bars and the brake lever, adjusting as needed to clamp the brake firmly enough to keep the bike from rolling. The tension can also be adjusted by how wide the rubber band is cut.

Store it over the top of the steerer tube/stem when riding, hooking it over the stem clamp bolts...you will figure it out.

Also works on flat bar bikes with 'regular' brake levers.

Note: I did not figure this out myself, I saw it in another thread somewhere on BF.
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Old 12-29-07, 02:44 PM   #5
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Lean the rear wheel/tire against the tree/pole or whatever. It won't roll. Retro grump that I am, I still use a (gasp) kickstand. bk
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Old 12-29-07, 02:52 PM   #6
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Carry a 6" tall flat rock. Using it under one pedal, bike will be supported just as though you had a kickstand. Just make sure to have the crank angle right so there isn't much lean, preventing the front wheel from flopping over. That way you don't need any superfluous bits hanging off your brake levers or clamped to the frame.

Round rocks may look more elegant, but are less functional. Large crystals are available in shops.

Your rock makes a statement; choose wisely. However, if you later find that your rock isn't compatible with your image, they (the rock) are easily recyclable.
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Old 12-29-07, 03:03 PM   #7
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Here is what you are looking for. Carry it in your bag, weighs only 75 grams. Elegant & stylish. Only need one even if you own several bikes.

The Click-Stand ...

http://www.click-stand.com/
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Old 12-29-07, 03:08 PM   #8
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I just lay my bike on the ground. So far I have been able to pick it back up.
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Old 12-29-07, 03:19 PM   #9
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Foregoing a carbon-based 6" rock (less than 900 grams), the click-stand is not a bad idea at all, and the tube-strip idea is good thinking.
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Old 12-29-07, 03:24 PM   #10
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I just lay my bike on the ground. So far I have been able to pick it back up.
But the dilemma is... laying it on the left side screws up the mirror and laying it on the right side is not good for the rear derailer. And when the bike is loaded down for touring there are lots of reasons you'd not want to lay it down.

Last summer I carried a special kickstand-like device that you wedge up around the bottom bracket to act like a normal kickstand. It seemed a little tedious.
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Old 12-29-07, 03:30 PM   #11
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If you lay your bike on the ground it can't fall over. That's not true when you use a kickstand.
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Old 12-29-07, 03:35 PM   #12
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If you lay your bike on the ground it can't fall over. That's not true when you use a kickstand.


Never had anything fall of the ground Yet.
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Old 12-29-07, 04:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
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So, when a tree or building is available, you could lean your bike against it, but you should engage one of the brakes so the bike doesn't roll.

What are some good tips about keeping your bike off the ground, when you're not straddling it? In a previous life as an Army medic, it was common to use "blousing rubbers" on your military pants. You would "blouse" your pant cuff with these short elastic bands with tiny hooks on their ends, so that the pants look like they're tucked in your boots. The point being something like elastic bands to press the rear brake lever towards the handlebar?

What do you use to anchor the (front or back?) brake lever ... and are there any other tips for propping bikes without kickstands?
There's always a tree or building or fence available. May have to walk a bit, however.
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Old 12-29-07, 04:39 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BSLeVan View Post
I carry a small 10 inch strip of Velcro (two-sided)
...
It can be used to hold a brake lever in
+1
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Old 12-30-07, 01:15 AM   #15
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Here's another one you can carry in a bag, the Greenfield EasyStand. It slips between your cranks and the hub, whenever you need it.
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Old 12-30-07, 02:29 AM   #16
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A bike will roll away when it's leaned against something? Really?

Anyway, my trike (which could roll away) has a parking brake. Apply the brake, push a button on the brake lever mechanism, and it holds the brake applied.
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Old 12-30-07, 06:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil View Post
This thread strikes me as being equivalent to one on "how to keep warm in the snow without wearing a coat."
. . . and, so, you shiver in the cold and your bike falls over, or you wear a coat to keep warm and have either equipped your bike with a kick stand or have figured out some reliable means of standing it upright securely without relying on the kickstand.

The OP probably has figured out the coat part . . . this thread is about the "standing a bike upright without a kickstand" part.

So, humorous us with a response to the question, if you will.

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Old 12-30-07, 06:15 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by bkaapcke View Post
Lean the rear wheel/tire against the tree/pole or whatever. It won't roll. Retro grump that I am, I still use a (gasp) kickstand. bk
My LBS taught me this trick. If you make certain that the rear tire contacts "the tree/pole or whatever" at 1:00 and 5:00, friction at those points will conspire to lock the tire in place . . . it won't roll forward or backward.

You'd be amazed at how securely this arrangement will allow you to confidently lean your bike up against most any vertical surface.

If you are doubtful, feel free to lock either front or rear brake for added protection.

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Old 12-30-07, 06:17 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil View Post
Here is what you are looking for. Carry it in your bag, weighs only 75 grams. Elegant & stylish. Only need one even if you own several bikes.

The Click-Stand ...

http://www.click-stand.com/
Nothing wrong with that gizzmo - but I'd rather search for and go with a solution that doesn't involve adding another piece of gear to your package. For the price you pay to lug that stick around, you may as well go with a kick stand and be done with it.

Caruso
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Old 12-30-07, 08:19 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Motorad View Post
...and are there any other tips for propping bikes without kickstands?
This is similar to reiffert's approach, but without the rock. Dismount next to a curb. While standing on the side of the bike opposite the curb, use your foot to spin your cranks counterclock-wise until your pedal (laying flat) comes in contact with the stop of the curb. Assuming you're not on a slope, your bike should now stand up all by itself. I've never had a bike fall over in such a configuration.

P.S. I've heard about skiph's approach, but it was in terms of preventing folks from quickly taking off with your bike while you were stopping at the loo, buying pie, etc. (i.e., thief jumps on your bike, hoping to make a quick get-away, and is rudely surprised when it will barely move).

Last edited by BillK; 12-30-07 at 08:25 AM.
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Old 12-30-07, 08:48 AM   #21
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I use the velcro trick to set the brake when parking my LWB bent, especially when I have the lexan front fairing on it. The thick rubber band trick would work, too. Thanks for the tip!
If it is really windy I'll lay my bike down on its left side, although as David says, it screws up my "Fred Mirror!" But it has to be really windy to lay it down.
At a ride (CANDISC) for evening entertainment they had a comedian give a real funny routine. He brought down the house when he said "he figured out the difference between the cheap $200.00 Wal Mart Beaters and the $3000.00 bikes. The Wal Mart Beaters are parked held up with kick stands, the expensive ones are thrown down in the mud and dirt! "
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Old 12-30-07, 09:12 AM   #22
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I lean the bike against a tree, a wall, a fence or whatever is available without anything to hold the brake or wheel. I often use my pedal to support the bike on a curb or parking barrier. When it is windy or there is no convenient place to lean the bike, I just lay it down on its left side. No biggie.
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Old 12-30-07, 09:38 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillK View Post
This is similar to reiffert's approach, but without the rock. Dismount next to a curb. While standing on the side of the bike opposite the curb, use your foot to spin your cranks counterclock-wise until your pedal (laying flat) comes in contact with the stop of the curb. Assuming you're not on a slope, your bike should now stand up all by itself. I've never had a bike fall over in such a configuration.

P.S. I've heard about skiph's approach, but it was in terms of preventing folks from quickly taking off with your bike while you were stopping at the loo, buying pie, etc. (i.e., thief jumps on your bike, hoping to make a quick get-away, and is rudely surprised when it will barely move).
These are the methods I use and they work quite well. And the cost is just right.
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Old 12-30-07, 10:11 AM   #24
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You only have to lean your bike against whatever it is you want to lean it against with only the back tire in contact with the leaning post, tree, trash can or whatever. It will not go anywhere or fall over. Try it.
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Old 12-30-07, 10:48 AM   #25
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And then there's the forgotten art of propping up the bike against the curb with the pedal.
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