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Old 05-11-08, 07:11 AM   #51
mandovoodoo
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An interesting situation.

I wouldn't pay $1600.

But I'd get the Colnago back. On flat land you're not going to see the benefits of new frames, assuming there are any. I'd also strongly suggest upgrading the running gear.

I've thought this over a good deal, almost buying a retro frame to set up. And considering repainting my 1974 bike and setting it up

Now my "old" OS paramount is coming back and I plan to full DA it and ride it.

I'm riding primarily a new CF Italian fancy bike, Campy etc., and it's great. But it doesn't make much different on the flats. Climbing and descending, yes, but on the flat who cares. So the oldster will do as well.
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Old 05-11-08, 09:04 AM   #52
wrk101
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+1 for N+1

One modern bike for all of its advantages, and the vintage classic for all of its advantages. Myself, I really like brifters, but you are only going to have one chance to buy back your old classic. Once someone else snarfs it up, it is gone forever.....
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Old 05-11-08, 02:04 PM   #53
John E
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The minuscule speed benefit of a modern bike is definitely worthwhile if one is racing, but I find the expense very hard to justify for myself.
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Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
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Old 05-11-08, 04:41 PM   #54
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I'd love to have my old 72 Campy equipped Legnano back. All I can ever think of is it laying on its side and rusting away somewhere. Wish I'd never let her go. That being said, I now ride a modern steel frame bike with full Ultegra equipment.

I'd love to own your old Colnago, big fan of retro bikes here.

Keith
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Old 05-11-08, 04:54 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stapfam View Post
Going to disagree with most here. . . .
Of course he would. Those Brits have no sense of tradition.
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Old 05-11-08, 05:23 PM   #56
GeraldChan
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It would be difficult to do better than a classic steel Colanago.

You have to get that one back as your friend's stewardships of the machine is a blessing.

Two options come to mind:

Remove and sell the group on ebay to some Campy collector.
Take the proceeds and buy a modern Chorus or Centaur and have a pro shop or frame builder spread your rear stays to 130mm. This set-up would be fine in a flat area.

You could also convert the old gal to a FG bike; as was commonly done "back in the day" for winter training. You could just sell the wheels and drivetrain to help finance a modern CF bike.

If it were me I would keep the old NR/SR stuff but still convert to a fixed gear and use the Record hubs and tubular wheels AND buy a modern CF bike cuz they really are nice right out of the box!
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Old 05-12-08, 08:30 AM   #57
John E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
... well built older steel frame will ride just as good if not better and for most of us and climb as well as a new all CF bike. The issue is the components.
I concur that any high-end 1960s or 1970s bike's frame will be better than its components.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
... Try shifting on a standing climb with down tubes
No wonder folks are complaining about short-lived chains and cogsets. Even if you can shift under load, that does not mean you should. Vintage drivetrains force one to adopt proper gear changing technique, which includes shifting early and unloading the cranks during the gear change.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
... Many of us here like the tight gear spacings of a 10 speed cassette, you can keep the same cadence and pedal pressure as the terrain and wind resistance changes and it makes the ride so much more enjoyable. With the new stuff you don't even think about shifting - you just do it.
With a two-tooth drop in back and either half-step or 1.5-step chainring spacing, I get the exact equivalent of a corncob single-tooth ratiometric progression. I admittedly do not get both adequate range and tight spacing with a 2x5 setup, but with 6, preferably 7 cogs on the freewheel and/or a triple up front, I can get the dozen or more useful ratios which will take me from the low-to-mid 40s to the mid-to-upper 90s with 6-7% spacing. All I am giving up at that point is three or more gears above 100 gear-inches, for which I have no real use, anyway.
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Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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