Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-13-08, 08:13 PM   #1
trek5000
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
trek5000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Delco PA
Bikes: Trek 5000 / Cannondale SR500 / Bianchi '79 Giro
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
why do I like by 7 spd more than 10 spd cassette rides ??

curious but have to comment .. I ride a trek cf 10 spd triple as primary ride 11 - 24 but have recently been building for ride a couple of 7 spd freewheel rigs... one with 12 - 34 ( trple ) and another 12 - 28 dbl affair, alum and steel rides, any way the point of the post being.... i am favoring the 7 spd free wheel rides friction shift rides , over the " up to date" 10 spd ride.... ?? got to say less choice is better .. not to mention the stump puller 34t lets me coast my 54 yo butt up the hill like butter..... what wrong with me.... I seem to be building/buying bikes tailored for my rides perhaps....!! anyone else experience this thang..... or is this just the way to justify more bikes for the collection....hmmmm
trek5000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-08, 08:34 PM   #2
roadfix
hello
 
roadfix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 18,588
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Yes, less choice is better. That's why I prefer to ride either the single speed or the fixed gear over my 8 speed geared road bike as much as I can which is often.
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-08, 08:51 PM   #3
mandovoodoo
Violin guitar mandolin
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Friendsville, TN, USA
Bikes: Wilier Thor, Fuji Professional, LeMond Wayzata
Posts: 1,171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pretty funny, isn't it? I grew up with 2 x 5 "10 speed" - usually my standard utility rig was 42 x 52 with 14 - 28 5 speed cogset. I've got a 9 speed that's got 42 x 52 with a 30 inside, and a 12-28. Surprise. I'm almost always double shifting the back. Makes me wonder why I'm carrying those extra cogs! That bike has bar ends. I flipped the rear shifter to friction and in about 5 minutes forgot I'd ever had indexing. Weird.

Although riding hard and fast, I find the 10 cogs on my sport bike to just about right. Kind of a different environment and approach.

Too hilly for single speed, but it would sure make decisions easy.
mandovoodoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-08, 08:52 PM   #4
The Smokester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: N. California
Bikes:
Posts: 1,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Whether I prefer wide ranging gears or my closely-spaced 10 spd depends on the terrain/wind and whether I am riding alone or in a pace line.
The Smokester is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-08, 05:31 AM   #5
cyclinfool
gone ride'n
 
cyclinfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Bikes: Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
Posts: 4,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I find that I use every gear on my road bikes on the rides I do. If I am driving hard for long distances having a gear ratio that keeps my cadence and effort in a comfortable range helps in getting the most out the bike/ride. If I am just cruising - like when I ride to work it doesn't matter, I doubt if I use more than 4 gears. I decided some time ago not to use my commute rides as opportunities for more training - if I did I'd start taking the car.
cyclinfool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-08, 08:32 AM   #6
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
You have mentioned the one disadvantage of 10 speed that I can think of- Lack of a dinner plate as the largest sprocket on the cassette. This can be overcome as a 10 speed 11/34 is available if you have enough money ($150)

Taking the same gears- say 11/28 that is common on 7-8 and 10 speed. The 7 speed 11/28 has a hole in the gearing and that one gear change is a jump. This is better if a 12/28 is used. The 8 speed 11/28 does not have the hole and for that reason- I prefer 8 speed. Now 9 speed does have the dinner plate and I use 11/32 or 12/34 and this is the commonly used gearing on mountain bikes. All it is -is 8speed with a lower gear but it works.

Now 10 speed- and I have 12/27 and 12/25. On the 27- the 10th- 9th and 8th gear (27t,24t and 21t) have that hole back again. The jump between the gears is too large- but as you will only use them going uphills- the jump is not noticable really. The 25 is closer ratio and even I can run between the gears comfortably. Never tried a 23 or a 21 but I should think the closeness of the ratios on those will be superb. Would not enjoy too many hills with a 21 though.

It does depend on the use you put the bike to but If I were to build up a bike again- I would opt for 9 speed on the road. I do need a lower gear for the hills- and I can put up with the Jump from 28 to 32- But I do like the close ratios that a 12/25 gives me in 10 speed.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-08, 08:47 AM   #7
n4zou
Scott
 
n4zou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes: Too Many
Posts: 2,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I see no reason for more than 7 cogs on the cassette for my bikes. I'm not racing, or ride in a pace lines. 7-speed cassettes and freewheels currently cost less than $20. 6/7 speed chains are cheap as well and don't require special "one time use" pins. The spacing between the cogs are wider so smooth shifts are easy to obtain with any index or friction shifter. Less dish on the rear wheel reduces the chance of spoke breakage.

Now I hear 11 speed cassettes are about to hit the market. No, Thank you. What I have now works just fine.
n4zou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-08, 09:37 AM   #8
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,865
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
I will say that I have found that I really enjoy the rides on my bike with closer ratios a lot more. That said I am not sure how much it has to to with each of the many differences (number of gears, closeness of the ratios, width of the tires, weight, frame geometry, etc).

My road bike is broken (car/bike accident, car won), so I have been doing my rides on my touring bike. I have to say that I REALLY miss the road bike.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-08, 08:41 PM   #9
Ranger63
Senior Member
 
Ranger63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: western new york
Bikes: mid 80s Ross Centaur converted to Alfine 11 09 motobecane imortal force, 83 Ross Paragon,81 Schwinn LeTour Tourist, 91 Paramount, 93 GT converted to city bike
Posts: 719
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
7 to 10

Ahhh, a topic I am about to become all too familiar with.
I have a 46/34 compact double running thru a 12/26 7 speed on the 91 Paramount PDG
and am about to embark on a trip to the dark side.
Shimano ultegra 6600 paddle shift thru a Ultegra 6600 10 speed cassette/50/34 chainring on the Moto IF
I'm figuring: I'll wind up using 5 max out of these 20 gears 90% of the time.
I'll probably be a week on the indoor rollers (with the stabilizer hooked to the handlebars) trying to figure out the darn shift pattern ...and then, I'll bet dollars to doughnuts I'm reaching for the downtube on every shift.
Worst part is: I Love the Paramount. Ergo I'll on one with paddle and another with downtube and trying to figure out which is which before I have to shift..lol
Ranger63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-08, 09:03 PM   #10
Cone Wrench
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Bikes: 1976 Apollo Mk IV, mid-'80s Miyata touring bike, mid-'80s Miyata mtn bike, 2007 Trek 6500 mtn bike, 2008 Trek Madone 5.2
Posts: 730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's more useful to think of a triple chain ring/10-speed cassette combination as a smoother continuum of gears rather than as a wider choice of gears. One doesn't really choose which gear to ride in, you just sort of end up in a particular gear as conditions dictate. The triple/10-speed combination gives you close rations in three different ranges and, of course, it is simplified, because in the smallest chain ring, you are only using the biggest two or maybe three rear cogs. Once you begin to visualize the gearing as single smooth continuous line, the advantages of the 10-speed cassette become obvious.
Cone Wrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-08, 09:29 PM   #11
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Bikes: 2015 Specialized AWOL Comp frameset (custom build), 2015 Zukas custom road, 2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S
Posts: 13,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cone Wrench View Post
It's more useful to think of a triple chain ring/10-speed cassette combination as a smoother continuum of gears rather than as a wider choice of gears. One doesn't really choose which gear to ride in, you just sort of end up in a particular gear as conditions dictate. The triple/10-speed combination gives you close rations in three different ranges and, of course, it is simplified, because in the smallest chain ring, you are only using the biggest two or maybe three rear cogs. Once you begin to visualize the gearing as single smooth continuous line, the advantages of the 10-speed cassette become obvious.
I have the same experience with the triple/7-speed setup on my main bike with friction bar end shifters.
BluesDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-08, 07:07 AM   #12
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Bikes: Rans Rockst (Retro rocket) Rans Enduro Sport (Retro racket) Catrike 559, Merin Bear Valley (beater bike).
Posts: 26,738
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger63 View Post
I'll probably be a week on the indoor rollers (with the stabilizer hooked to the handlebars) trying to figure out the darn shift pattern ...
I think that you're making this shift pattern thing way too hard.

Shift pattern is something that we used to mess with when we had 5-speed freewheels. I even used to type my gear ratios up neatly on a piece of paper and tape it to my handlebar to help me find the next gear in the sequence.

With modern close ratio many cog cassettes I just think of my bike as having 2 or 3 gear ranges. On my Klein with the 50/34 compact crankset I do 90+% of my riding on the big ring and generally only use the small ring for climbing hills. On my triple equipped bikes I do almost all of my riding in the middle ring.
Retro Grouch is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:27 PM.