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Old 06-17-08, 11:02 AM   #1
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Bikes: Leader home built hardtail, Diamondback Response
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Conventional wisdom prevails.....


After months of experimentation the "White Rabbit is done." It appears that I am more conventional than I started out. What was the beginings of a TT bike is now a more or less normal roadbike. The entry level TT frame from Leader Bikes is a mild TT trainer with a 78deg seatpost (more upright than a traditional road bike but not as extreme as a full house TT). With the seat moved back it can be used as the basis of a road bike for someone who wants a reasonably short frame.

The final equipment list:

Leader Bike 720TT frame
PZ Racing "white" carbon fork
Ritchey Pro Bars and adjustable stem
SRAM Rival brakes
Shimano 2008 Sora 9 speed brifters running through TRP cyclocross brake levers
Shimano Tiagra 50/34 crank with Shimano BB cups.
SRAM 12/26 cassette
SRAM PC991 chain
Profile Design TT saddle (low end cromolly rail version)
Wellgo MG-1 pedals
Maddmaxx's own custom wheels with
2007 Shimano 105 hubs
Mavic CXP 23 rims (32 hole)
DT spokes 2.0/1.8/2.0 laced radial front.....radial left rear and 3 cross right rear
Kenda Kalliente Iron Cloak 23mm tires at 110psi

This is a true budget performance bike build. There is no carbon on the bike except for the TRP cyclocross brake levers. The bike weighs 20.5 lbs as pictured (empty bag). It is comfortable for this 62 year old geezer even though the bars are lower than anything I thought I would ever ride. (I'm going to credit the mild TT rider position of the frame for that. It is by far the fastest and most stable bicycle I have ever ridden. The only thing it doesn't do well so far is to make low speed u turns. (again, probably a function of the frames built in TT stability)

I have no real idea what it cost to build because some of the components were laying around the shop and some were scored as very good Ebay purchases. (ie saddle at 24.95......Brifters at $100....crankset at $75) etc.

I think that this may be the last road bike that I build for my own use.
Liberal bias makes it's own facts.

Last edited by maddmaxx; 06-01-09 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 06-17-08, 01:15 PM   #2
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Well done, Maxx. A+

I really like the budget build idea, it truly adds to the roll-your-own concept. I've got a pile of stuff laying around just waiting for the right frame to come along.
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Old 06-17-08, 07:27 PM   #3
John E
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Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
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There is nothing wrong with a "conventional" road bike, and budget DIY builds are always fun and rewarding.
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
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