Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Philologist
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    My Bikes
    Univega Gran Turismo
    Posts
    437
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Back on my bike!

    Well, I got my arm out of the cast Tuesday, had a couple of physical therapy sessions this week (which I get to repeat for the next few weeks), and started riding my new bike. Technically, the doctor said "in a week" so I really shouldn't have started until tomorrow. But I adjusted the seat to the right height Saturday and couldn't resist a few short rides up and down the street where I live. Sunday afternoon I adjusted the angle on the bars to put less weight on my arms in the drops, and that made it much more comfortable for my injured elbow, so I rode a few more laps up and down my street.

    This evening I decided to take a short tour of the neighborhood streets. Finally, for the first time in a couple of decades, I was really riding! Zipping downhill, downshifting at the bottom and pedaling up the next hill, making sweeping turns in the culs-de-sac and heading out again; it felt wonderful! Sure, I'm way out of condition and was huffing and puffing like a steam locomotive by the time I came home, and I had to stop and walk the bike up a couple of the steepest hills, but that's part of the reason I'm doing this. If anything will build up my endurance again, this will, and it's so much fun in the meantime. I'd forgotten how good being tired can feel when it comes at the end of an energetic ride. Plus, I think it's better therapy for my arm than any of the exercises I've been given to do. My elbow has much better range of motion after each ride than at any time since my accident.

    Now, I'd appreciate a bit of advice. This bike came with toe clips exactly like the ones I had on my old bike. I expected to have no trouble with them, but sometimes I seem to have a lot of difficulty getting both feet into them. I always start off with my right foot in the clip and try to slip my left foot in after a pedal stroke or two. Years ago it was very easy to do, but now I find myself spinning the pedal around and around before finally catching it just right. Sometimes it takes me a block or more to do it, and on the way home tonight I gave up and rode the last few blocks home with the left clip dangling uselessly from the bottom of the pedal.

    I think the problem is that the pedals are different from my old bike's pedals. The old pedals had saw-tooth edges that protruded significantly beyond the reflector strips and made it easy for my shoe sole to grip and control the pedal's movement when flipping it over. These pedals have only a single "tooth" and the much thicker reflectors stick out farther than the tooth. My shoes tend to slip off the edge of the reflector and either spin the pedal completely around or else end up on top of the clip rather than inside it.

    Is there some different technique that's needed for using clips on pedals like these, or am I just that much out of practice? I don't remember having anywhere near this much trouble when I first started using toe clips. Yes, I know some of you will say, "Get clipless pedals" but I'd really rather not as I like clips so much (when I can get my feet in them, at least).
    s ofereode, isses swa mg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
    from Deor, in the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)

  2. #2
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Must be 15 years since I rode with clip and straps and I never used to have a problem with them-But Clipless are better.

    My OCR came with cheap pedals and Clips and straps and They were the first thing to change on the bike. They are back on the bike as it is a loaner for ocasional riders that want to try a bike- and several of them have the same problem as you. It takes a while for them to get the technique right and to position the pedal in the right place to be able to slip the foot into place. They all seem to get it in the end. So suggestion is to get out and ride and practice.

    And glad to see no lasting problem after the fall- just don't do too many miles at a time initially to get your arm and the rest of you sorted.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  3. #3
    Senior Member RoMad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Citrus county Fl.
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Tuscany , Lemond Poprad, 1970's Motobecane Grand Record
    Posts
    779
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good for you to be riding again. I had toe clips on my mountain bike for a long time and liked them. I think you will get back to it with more practice but I will tell you how I did it. I would start off with one foot in the toe clip and then when the clip on the other pedal makes it start to turn upside down I would put that foot on the forward edge of the pedal and pull toward the back of the bike. As the pedal flipped back to where the toe clip was on top I just slid my foot forward. It is easier to do than it was to write this. Good luck and have fun.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    4,866
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it's a combination of things. Possibly the new pedals are harder to control when flipping over to insert your foot. You probably are out of practice but you'll get used to them. Another thing to consider is your shoes. You didn't mention what type of footwear you are riding in. Some shoes are harder to deal with in that situation than others. It'll all come together, have patience.

  5. #5
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Between Crystal River and Hernando, Florida, 6 miles west of the Withlacoochee Trail
    My Bikes
    I've had several since 1999 but have settled on my beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany. Just ordered a 2015 Cannondale Supersix EVO 105 to replace my "destroyed" CAAD 10 2.
    Posts
    13,745
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great.

    When I had my arm in the sling after shoulder surgery, I rode the trainer to keep my fitness up. The arm will get stronger as you do more p/t.

    Toe clips??? I haven't ridden with those "death traps" since 1989.
    Clipless is much safer. Give them a try. SPDs are 2 sided. Eggbeaters are 4 sided.
    My bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2015 Cannondale Supersix EVO carbon 105 on order

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  6. #6
    Philologist
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    My Bikes
    Univega Gran Turismo
    Posts
    437
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I think it's a combination of things. Possibly the new pedals are harder to control when flipping over to insert your foot. You probably are out of practice but you'll get used to them. Another thing to consider is your shoes. You didn't mention what type of footwear you are riding in. Some shoes are harder to deal with in that situation than others. It'll all come together, have patience.
    It did actually turn out to be the shoes. I went for another ride this morning at 6:00 am with different shoes and had no trouble at all with the clips.

    I think I'm going to continue doing my riding early in the morning for awhile. It's much cooler, there's very little traffic in my neighborhood at that hour, and it's a great way to start the day!
    s ofereode, isses swa mg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
    from Deor, in the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)

  7. #7
    Philologist
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    My Bikes
    Univega Gran Turismo
    Posts
    437
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stapfam View Post
    And glad to see no lasting problem after the fall- just don't do too many miles at a time initially to get your arm and the rest of you sorted.
    Don't worry, I'm taking it easy. At physical therapy today I told the therapist what I'm doing and she said it's OK as long as I don't overdo it and am careful not to fall again. She also was pleased with my progress in regaining range of motion so I must be doing something right.
    s ofereode, isses swa mg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
    from Deor, in the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)

  8. #8
    Philologist
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    My Bikes
    Univega Gran Turismo
    Posts
    437
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RoMad View Post
    Good for you to be riding again. I had toe clips on my mountain bike for a long time and liked them. I think you will get back to it with more practice but I will tell you how I did it. I would start off with one foot in the toe clip and then when the clip on the other pedal makes it start to turn upside down I would put that foot on the forward edge of the pedal and pull toward the back of the bike. As the pedal flipped back to where the toe clip was on top I just slid my foot forward. It is easier to do than it was to write this. Good luck and have fun.
    What you described is exactly the way I've always done it. I tried a different pair of shoes this morning and my problem disappeared, so I'm good to go now.
    s ofereode, isses swa mg. ("That passed away, this also can.")
    from Deor, in the Exeter Book (folios 100r-100v)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •