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-   Fifty Plus (50+) (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/)
-   -   For the 50+ 'newbie' rider (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/438160-50-newbie-rider.html)

cyclinfool 07-08-08 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Catweazle (Post 7019180)
Thoroughly agree. It all came out as a rush of words, I was surprised to see it blow out to 6000 words, and I was worried when I posted it that it might come across as daunting.

It needs some pictures and diagrams, as mentioned, but do you think it'd help if each post commenced with a brief, point form synopsis?

I should say - Great job - insiration is a wonderful elixur.
Maybe what you might do is force a hard limit on yourself - maybe 1000 words for the basic post. We have to do this in proposals where customers have a strict page limit, we do the mental vomit and then edit it down to the bare esentials - it forces you to put in just what is really needed. Then I would put links in for more indepth coverage for each area. Then at the end of each area I would put in references and links to other sites - like Sheldon Brown, Book references, article references, etc.

But let me remind you - this is your contribution, there may be no end to nit picking and suggestions. The final assessment is yours - not ours and I am sure that what ever you come up with will be valuable to the newbie audience.

One last thought - Between what was generated in the past stickies and in the history on this site I think that between you and DF you could/should write a book.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Catweazle (Post 7019180)
P.S. I'm done with this for today. My daughter has just informed me that it's my birthday, so I'm off to celebrate what I'd forgotten about :D


Yes - stop faffing around and go ride your age!

cranky old dude 07-08-08 01:54 PM

Great stuff. I've been riding on and off for most of my life, and I've learned
a thing or two from your post. I say continue on, this is valuable information.
Like Louis mentioned I believe I'll print this, then I'll laminate and hang
and hang it in my garage.

RonH 07-08-08 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7019728)
As regards 50+ vs "older rider" I much prefer 50+.

Many forums have some sort of a sticky about choosing a bike, etc. I.e., the Clydesdale forum has special info for heavier and larger riders.

Good job, Cat

Ok. I changed the title to "50+" and made it a sticky.
I hope everyone is happy. If not, tell me when to duck. :twitchy:

Catweazle 07-08-08 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7019728)
As regards 50+ vs "older rider" I much prefer 50+. We had a lot of discussion about this when we started the forum. "Older" is a non-defined term which could be anywhere from 25 to 80, depending upon the reader's viewpoint. 50+ has a real meaning.

Thoroughly agree. Sure, a good deal of the content has wider relevence, but the posting of it in 50+ gives meaning to its purpose. There's an undercurrent of "What's changed since the 60s/70s?" in the writing of it, and that's been deliberate. For even the younger folk amongst the 50+ netizens who haven't really ridden since they were kids, that's when they were kids!



Quote:

Originally Posted by cyclinfool (Post 7021679)
Maybe what you might do is force a hard limit on yourself - maybe 1000 words for the basic post.

If that's going to happen it'll need someone to do the condensing, because I don't really want to. I spent several years recently writing regular monthly magazine 'how-to' columns. Condensing content down to strict word limits is the hardest part of the writing, and it invariably leaves you dissatisfied with the end result. The above was written over a few 'spare time' periods stolen from a weekend. Condensing it all down to about a thousand words would take me about a week of work!





P.S. Could somebody please tell me what "WWSBHD" represents? :)

AngeloOldSpokes 07-08-08 07:12 PM

fabulous job on this thread!

Yen 07-08-08 07:17 PM

Hey, it's a sticky!:thumb:

Yen 07-08-08 08:41 PM

CW, here's something to add to the Resources list (each one is a link):

Cycling Past 50 by Joe Friel
Bike for Life: How to Ride to 100 by Roy M. Wallack and Bill Katovsky
Food for Fitness: Eat Right to Train Right by Chris Carmichael (this source, more than any other, helped me understand the importance of food as fuel, rather than just something to stuff in my mouth:o)

And here's a booklet given to Hubby today when he joined a bike group for seniors:
Bicycling Street Smarts by John S. Allen

DnvrFox 07-09-08 05:29 AM

It is really great not seeing "DnvrFox" as the author of almost all the stickies, and of having just a couple of stickies!

Thanks Catweazle and others.

Here is a good link for the VERY beginner:

Learning to Ride as an Adult

Here is an edit on "Bar Height"

You wrote:

"Bar height

It won’t be an issue with step-through (ladies) bikes of course, but if that bike frame has a top tube you need to have clearance when standing astride it. For comfort and safety you should be aiming at a minimum of two inches (50mm) of clearance between crotch and bar, when you’re standing astride and off the saddle. If you don’t have that then look for a bike with a smaller frame, because that’n is too big for you."


Actually, on a road bike, and for guys like me with short legs, if you get a clearance of 2 inches, you will be riding a frame way too small. Bar height is among the least important of the measurements on a road bike fit. I have nowhere near a 2 inch clearance. This will vary with a compact frame, as the top tube is slanted.

Catweazle 07-09-08 07:06 AM

Bar height info altered, to correct a shortcoming pointed out by DnvrFox. Thanks, mate :thumb:

OldLog 07-12-08 12:41 PM

As someone who hasn't been on a bike for 50 years this was a great thread. Thanks for the information and taking the time to do it.

bbbullie 07-17-08 12:58 PM

Were do I start?
 
I have narrowed my search down to only two bikes. Can you help me with which one is the best? I like the gary fisher Montare dual sport and the Trek ladies 7.5 fx hybrid. I've read a few reviews and still am confused. I plan on riding country roads, gravel, easy off road. I am just 50, returning to biking.

Catweazle 07-17-08 07:57 PM

Hiya bbbullie, and welcome.

It'd be best to pursue your quest for purchasing advice in a new forum thread. You'll attract more and better assistance that way.

Siu Blue Wind 07-17-08 09:38 PM

What a way to welcome newbies. Great job, Catweazle! And thank you. :)

wobblyoldgeezer 07-22-08 09:47 AM

Spot on!
 
Coming late to this thread, I'm impressed and full of admiration. Good job, Mr. Feline Rodent.

Thorough, clear, supportive and approachable.

Yipster

I just did a 'soft' tour with 50+ folk who have already done a lot of miles on tough charity rides, and I'm sure that they'd have found it easier to have followed your advice on gearing, fit and cadence. It's tough to give advice without implying criticism, and your approach shows how to do it

Excellent contribution

delsolranger 08-07-08 05:54 PM

If I had read this information before buying a bike, I would not have bought what I did, so yeah..it's all good info and although it can be a lot of information to take in, I should have taken it all it before buying a bike that really doesn't fit me.

Now I'll search the forum to see if there's anything I can do to modify this bike, or if I need to go shopping again.

Red Rider 08-07-08 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by delsolranger (Post 7228465)
If I had read this information before buying a bike, I would not have bought what I did, so yeah..it's all good info and although it can be a lot of information to take in, I should have taken it all it before buying a bike that really doesn't fit me.

Now I'll search the forum to see if there's anything I can do to modify this bike,
or when I need to go shopping again.

Fixed that for you. ;)

Welcome to the wonderful world of N+1.

scienceguy 08-10-08 09:30 PM

shifting
 
I solved the shifting problem by buying a Bianchi Milano with the Shimano Nexus 8 speed hub. No pain, no strain, no derailleur on the chain!...

Daniel Cason 08-23-08 11:28 AM

Thank You
 
I would like to thank you for your help. I in joyed reading your article. It has helped me a lot.

MAC57 08-23-08 02:25 PM

Upset Me? Heck NO!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Catweazle (Post 7016906)
Hi again folks. Quite a few thread views but no comments? Did I upset you by posting this? I hope not.

Have people perhaps got suggestions about favourite 'informative' threads they think would be worth adding to post #8 above?

Hi Catweazle,

This post was PERFECT. I printed it out for my leisure re-reading. I am 60 and had to give up running due to the knees. I still speed walk but want to start riding. Last bike I had and rode didn't have gears and had foot brakes! I don't understand the strange looks I get when I talk to my daughters and sons-in-law about foot brakes...

My son in law will be taking me to his bike shop in a week or so to purchase a bike. The section of your post about the hybrid was very helpful, as I want to ride on both paved bike paths and on wooded trails. I will find out Monday when I try out my daughters' bike if the saying is true that one never forgets how to ride a bike. I guess my biggest worry is that I really will need to learn how to fix a bike also.

Thanks again for a very informative and comprehensive post for those of us who know little about the New Age of Biking

Oh BTW, do you or anyone know if there is such a thing as converting an on the road bike to a stationary bike for winter use? (When I arise in the AM and get home from work in the PM in the winter it's dark.)

DnvrFox 08-23-08 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MAC57 (Post 7329030)
Hi Catweazle,


Oh BTW, do you or anyone know if there is such a thing as converting an on the road bike to a stationary bike for winter use? (When I arise in the AM and get home from work in the PM in the winter it's dark.)


They are called a "trainer" and they are available at your bike shop, online - try nashbar.com, from Craigslist, etc.

Here is a group with lots of information about trainers. Check the files section.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...yguid=11846886

Or do a search on BFN about trainers. There are many and varied - they start about $89 - magnetic, fluid, wind, etc.

MAC57 08-24-08 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7329247)
They are called a "trainer" and they are available at your bike shop, online - try nashbar.com, from Craigslist, etc.

Here is a group with lots of information about trainers. Check the files section.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...yguid=11846886

Or do a search on BFN about trainers. There are many and varied - they start about $89 - magnetic, fluid, wind, etc.


Thanks. Do you own a trainer and/or can you recommend a moderately priced good one?

DnvrFox 08-24-08 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MAC57 (Post 7334807)
Thanks. Do you own a trainer and/or can you recommend a moderately priced good one?


It depends a bit on your purpose for using the trainer, and your budget.

Some folks believe that the fluid and the air trainers better simulate actual riding than the magnetic trainers (which are the cheapest)

I have a Minoura Mag Trainer and my wife uses a Nashbar brand mag trainer. Both about $100 - the Minoura has more adjustments for tension, and it can be adjusted from the bars. More expensive trainers will go up to about $250 or so.

Some folks don't even use trainers, they use rollers - much more difficult because you actually balance your bike on a stationary indoor "track."

And, some folks ride outside at night with proper lights and reflectors, and all year round with proper weather gear.

You takes your choice!

Have fun.

DnvrFox 09-04-08 05:17 PM

In case you are interested in clipless pedals, there is a great article here:

http://www.caree.org/bike101cliplesspedals.htm

sanndiego 12-09-08 02:24 AM

thank you for the info!!!
 
hi thanks so much for the excellent info! i am a new biker and this was exceptionally helpful. i am debating which kind of bike to get... mountain or hybrid. i will re-read your posts several times!
thanks again and i sincerely look forward to enjoying this forum!
ann

Tony SF 02-03-09 02:29 AM

First of all. Hello fellow old guys!

Second - I use to ride a lot and race a fair amount. Then life changed and I could not ride and got FAT! Fat as in raced at 148 lbs at age 43 and hit 178 at age 55. I have started to ride again... and improve.:thumb:

So my question is what can I expect after 10-12 years away from the sport?

Will I ever be able to climb again? Will I ever be able to ride a flat road at 24+ m.p.h. again?

What can I reasonably expect from my body?

When I was riding a lot I always told people that the genetics were still there and they would be as good as they ever were relative to others the same age. But of course I was just being positive about their potential so they would ride. But now since Im finding time to ride again I wonder was I full of it? Or will I be a good rider; given time on the bike?


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