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Old 07-17-08, 09:33 AM   #1
Terrierman
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Rode the Felt last night

And I only fell three times. Sac River trails are a LOT more reasonable than Busiek. Though I can still find places that whip my butt. I am starting to get a teensy bit more comfortable on the trails. I am finding that I do not care for the clipless/platform pedals when I am on the trail, seems like the wrong side is always up and I have to concentrate on finding the right side to get clipped in. I also think I need to pop for the multi-release cleats, as that likely would have taken out at least one of the falls.

I also put on a big ring protector, it already has hit one rock shelf. At the same time I bought a bash ring that takes the place of the third chainring. If this were a strictly trail bike, that would be the way to go, but since I do see using it for other purposes too, I think the big ring protector is what will stay on.

Mountain bikes are fun.
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Old 07-17-08, 09:40 AM   #2
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And I only fell three times . . .
Sounds like a great start. With a bit of time and experience you easily should be able to make it into the double-digits
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Old 07-17-08, 09:43 AM   #3
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^^ Thanks, I shall endeavor to persevere!
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Old 07-17-08, 09:44 AM   #4
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It's good to hear your still having fun on the darkside.

I agree completely with the multi-release cleats. The ability, after you have messed up and are going down, to give a good yank and have the foot come loose is a great confidence booster when you are trying to learn new things.

On par with that, I have, for the time being put platform pedals on the TT bike. Why? Because my confidence is up and I will stay in the aerobars more. Because of this, I am slowly working my way through the I'm going to die in the next minute phase. I still don't understand why this has been so hard for me (others like velodiva have taken to the bars like the proverbial duck) but I am slowly learning.
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Old 07-17-08, 10:36 AM   #5
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It's good to hear your still having fun on the darkside.

I agree completely with the multi-release cleats. The ability, after you have messed up and are going down, to give a good yank and have the foot come loose is a great confidence booster when you are trying to learn new things.

On par with that, I have, for the time being put platform pedals on the TT bike. Why? Because my confidence is up and I will stay in the aerobars more. Because of this, I am slowly working my way through the I'm going to die in the next minute phase. I still don't understand why this has been so hard for me (others like velodiva have taken to the bars like the proverbial duck) but I am slowly learning.
She has the "X" factor that the rest of us lack.

However, I offer you this....When Cortez took on the Aztecs on April 21,1519, he landed near the site of Veracruz. There, to prevent all thought of retreat, he burned his ships - clip in and pedal like you mean it and you will stay upright.
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Old 07-17-08, 10:50 AM   #6
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She has the "X" factor that the rest of us lack.

However, I offer you this....When Cortez took on the Aztecs on April 21,1519, he landed near the site of Veracruz. There, to prevent all thought of retreat, he burned his ships - clip in and pedal like you mean it and you will stay upright.
But I don't want to burn the bike............I want to ride it


Besides, Cortez was brave.
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Old 07-17-08, 11:05 AM   #7
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Yeah, the jury's out on this mountain biking thing...
I have one spot around home where I hit the trails. The shut down for a few months after the Fed (GGNRA) bought the land for preservation. They're stabilizing and "re-naturalizing" the area and part of that is that they smoothed out and hard-packed some of the rutted bumpy old trails. They reopened a few of them and they're a lot smoother now (and not as much fun... it's like riding on a dirt road) but one thing they did NOT do was to soften the grades of some of the climbs. Add that to the Kaitai's being a stone pig (about 24 lbs) and it is hard work getting up them roads. I was huffing, I'll tell. Going down the other side where it's still bumpy and rutty and a wee bit dangerous was fun, though -really fun- but I'm a road guy for sure. Regardless of whether it's my LeMond or my Giant, road bikes are just silk compared to the Kaitai's burlap. Nice change of pace, though.
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Old 07-17-08, 11:08 AM   #8
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OK, the bike can stay, just burn the offending pedals. And then:

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Old 07-17-08, 11:12 AM   #9
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Yeah, the jury's out on this mountain biking thing...
I have one spot around home where I hit the trails. The shut down for a few months after the Fed (GGNRA) bought the land for preservation. They're stabilizing and "re-naturalizing" the area and part of that is that they smoothed out and hard-packed some of the rutted bumpy old trails. They reopened a few of them and they're a lot smoother now (and not as much fun... it's like riding on a dirt road) but one thing they did NOT do was to soften the grades of some of the climbs. Add that to the Kaitai's being a stone pig (about 24 lbs) and it is hard work getting up them roads. I was huffing, I'll tell. Going down the other side where it's still bumpy and rutty and a wee bit dangerous was fun, though -really fun- but I'm a road guy for sure. Regardless of whether it's my LeMond or my Giant, road bikes are just silk compared to the Kaitai's burlap. Nice change of pace, though.
I have this problem. Sometimes I like being afraid. So far, I've been able to be mildly terrified, which is pretty sweet. I also like challenges (sound familiar there, hill dude?) and the MTB is all that.
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Old 07-17-08, 11:17 AM   #10
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Add that to the Kaitai's being a stone pig (about 24 lbs)
That's not heavy for a mountain bike. Many MTBs are heavier than that.
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Old 07-17-08, 11:20 AM   #11
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I find it interesting that those of you from road bike backgrounds (very narrow bars by my standards) have difficulty learning MTB skills while some of us from MTB backgrounds take a long time to get comfortable on the road or TT bike. I wonder if the younguns have this same problem.
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Old 07-17-08, 11:25 AM   #12
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That's not heavy for a mountain bike. Many MTBs are heavier than that.
Felt Nine Comp = 1.17 stone pigs in weight.
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Old 07-17-08, 12:22 PM   #13
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Trying to pick up from several replies. Offroad and full clipless rules- They work at keeping your feet on the pedals. Even when you fall so no flailing legs to get broken. Offroad is great but uphill is hard. But you have lower gears and you can go as slow as you like till you get to the tricky bits. Downhill is best taken at speed- You only hit every other lump then and if you are fast enough- the trees don't jump out in front of you.

MTB's in general are Robust. A hardtail that is 24lbs or less will be about the norm- but a 20lb one would climb easier. And on the falling- keep practising- sounds like you need it.
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Old 07-17-08, 12:25 PM   #14
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Better rode the Felt than felt the road.

I cannot believe the thread made it that far before some moron indulged in a little witzelsucht. I appreciate it.
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