Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Banned. The Weak Link's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Post-partisan Paradise
    My Bikes
    GF Wahoo '05, Trek T1000 '04, Lemond Buenos Aires '07
    Posts
    4,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    55 y/o seeks advice re: touring/charity rides

    Touring as used in this thread is defined as a long (>40 miles) large group ride typically involving registration fees, complimentary T-shirts, and SAG stops. It may be one or multiple days.

    I've signed up for the Old Kentucky Home Tour (www.okht.org) in September and am already torquing out about it. It's 55 miles out, overnight at Bardstown, and 55 miles back.

    When I've gone on group rides before, I've ridden with hammerheads, which means that I enjoy the benefits of a paceline until the first big hill and I get shelled out the back.

    It would be easier I think if I could find some like-minded lazy souls who are willing to take advantage of drafting. I don't want to attach myself leech-like to someone's rear wheel. I don't mind if someone attaches to mine, because it would be a first for me.

    Is there an etiquette about such things?

  2. #2
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I generally find folks to ride with for an hour or two. I talk with them, then either they or I stop for something or whatever, and then I form a new group of friends. It passes the time of day rather nicely.

    Obviously, I am not into pace lines.

    For only 55 miles, why not enjoy the scenery?

  3. #3
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    My Bikes
    Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
    Posts
    4,052
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Only serious paceline with those you trust and who will look out for each other. Pacelines have pretty strict etiquette and rules, sometimes people get angry. I don't want a careless rider on my back wheel and I won't ride the wheel of someone I don't trust. The issue is not etiquette, its safety. If you do find yourself sucking wheel off someone you don't know make sure you always have a safe bailout and look at the road ahead of them/you - don't stare at thier wheel.

    I have never done a tour ride like this with a group, sounds like a lot of fun. I wanted to do an MS150 once (2 - 75 mile days) but had an injury when I was training for it and had to drop out.

    Have fun - I am jealous
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  4. #4
    Lincoln, CA Mojo Slim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lincoln, CA
    My Bikes
    94 Giant ATX 760, 2001 Biachi Eros, 2005 Giant OCR2 Composite +
    Posts
    2,229
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know how many will be on this ride, but if it's anything over 100, you shouldn't have any trouble finding a couple of like-riding groups. Maybe think "drafting" instead of "paceline". Or "real close single file riding". I find when I am in a casual group of 4-8 riders I find some folks like to ride in front and don't mind pulling others along. Others are OK hanging back. If you can, move to the front now and then. If it's allowed (closed course?), riding 2-3 abreast is a good way to chat and not look like you are always the wheel sucker.
    Truth is stranger than reality.
    '96 Giant ATX 760 MTB
    '01 Bianchi Eros
    '05 Giant OCR Llimited Carbon Fiber + upgrades

  5. #5
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,793
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of these tips should work for you.

    As for drafting with strangers or new acquaintances, I would play it by ear. If you notice anyone riding at a pace close to yours, watch them. If they are riding pretty steadily, follow from a little distance. If you think it's a good wheel to follow, ask if they mind if you hop on their wheel. Or slowly pass and see if they try to catch your wheel. If it happens, it happens. If not, just enjoy the ride.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  6. #6
    Senior Member BengeBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    My Bikes
    2014 Pivot Mach 5.7 MTB, 2009 Chris Boedeker custom, 1988 Tommasini Prestige, 2007 Bill Davidson custom; 1988 Specialized Stumpjumper
    Posts
    6,935
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Over in the Northwest forum, there was a long discussion about the etiquette of drafting on group rides (should you draft on someone else's paceline; should you ask before you join a paceline; what kind of paceline to join, etc.). Some of this dialogue is shaped by the fact that the STP is a pretty crowded ride, and the early miles in particular can be hectic.

    You may find some of this useful to get a sense for some of the etiquette assumptions:

    STP Paceline Question

    (STP = Seattle to Portland. It's a little over 200 miles...most people do it in two days, some do it in one).

  7. #7
    Banned. The Weak Link's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Post-partisan Paradise
    My Bikes
    GF Wahoo '05, Trek T1000 '04, Lemond Buenos Aires '07
    Posts
    4,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, especially those last two posts! Very helpful information, exactly what I wanted to know.

  8. #8
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Weak Link View Post
    Thanks, especially those last two posts! Very helpful information, exactly what I wanted to know.
    I feel so . . . . . . . . . . . slighted!

    (Have a ball!)

  9. #9
    Senior Member 12bar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    West Central FL
    My Bikes
    Specialized, Felt, Surly, Masi,Giant
    Posts
    383
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have ridden many charity rides and you can almost always find others that will ride a pace comfortable for you. As others have said be very careful when riding with folks you don't know and watch the road well ahead of the person you are following. As for pace lines and drafting if you aren't willing to take your turn on the front it's bad form to just set in and get a free ride. I don't mind if someone hops on my wheel for a while but when they just sit there mile after mile I don't like it and will usually slow down to get them to pass.
    "It doesn't interest me to know where you live or how much money you have. I want to know if you can get up after a night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done for someone you love". Blazeman, Warrior Poet

    11 Giant Talon 1, 10 Masi 3VC, 08 Long Haul Trucker, 08 Felt Curbside, 99 Specialized Allez

  10. #10
    Violin guitar mandolin
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Friendsville, TN, USA
    My Bikes
    Wilier Thor, Fuji Professional, LeMond Wayzata
    Posts
    1,171
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Take a crash kit and use good mirrors. I like the company, but I won't do these anymore. The mix proves terrifying for the first bits. Often annoys motorists with dang good reason. Weirdness slips out for some people when they're in a group.

    But they're really fun, other than the risk of death and maiming, and the need for vigilance.

    After 15 miles, usually things thin out and it's OK.

    Problem isn't the average behavior, it's that in a large group the outliers come to play and cause trouble. Weaving mama plus head down teen doesn't work real well.

  11. #11
    Banned. The Weak Link's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Post-partisan Paradise
    My Bikes
    GF Wahoo '05, Trek T1000 '04, Lemond Buenos Aires '07
    Posts
    4,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In the one tour I did last year I noticed that the first five miles resembled the "highway Of Hell" of Basra during the First Gulf War: the roadway was littered with broken down bikes that hadn't so much had seen a drop of WD-40 in the last five years, with riders having sprinted full blast like it was the last 500 meters of a TdF leg and were gasping for air and asking to be killed on the spot to be put out of their misery.

    So I guess one of the keys is to either go out fast with a lead group, or go out very slowly and hope to survive the harsh Darwinian process of group riding dynamics.

  12. #12
    Senior Member George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Katy Texas
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix
    Posts
    5,293
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I'm riding I wait for a group to come along, at a pace that looks pretty close to the speed I like and jump in. If I get dropped, I'll wait for another one. They seem to come in waves.
    George

  13. #13
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,793
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Weak Link View Post
    So I guess one of the keys is to either go out fast with a lead group, or go out very slowly and hope to survive the harsh Darwinian process of group riding dynamics.
    I prefer a third option between those two. Let the fast bunch leave ahead of you so you don't get tempted to ride over your head. Then I go at my pace ahead of most of the moving road hazards. You will still have to pass a few slower wobbly riders who took off with the lead group and quickly got dropped and there will be some fast pacelines who started late. Watch out for the ones who are too cool to call out "on your left".
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Dchiefransom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Newark, CA. San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    6,191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Unless I actually planned to ride with another person, I figure on riding by myself. I usually end up linking up with someone just before or after the first rest stop that is riding at my pace. For 55 miles I wouldn't plan on pacelining anyway. Riding with groups I've found the majority of them start out too hard, then straggle in at the end. The two centuries I've ridden were almost totally by myself with no drafting, less than 10 miles total both times.
    A more experienced rider in my club once told me for a long ride; "Start out slow, and taper off".
    Silver Eagle Pilot

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •