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  1. #1
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    2007 Trek 7.6 FX Crankset

    Ok, I am a novice with regard to bike components. I purchased a used 2007 Trek 7.6 FX for $400. The bike is in like new condition. I had a tune-up at the LBS and the tech said that the bike is in mint condition.

    My question is about the crankset. My 2007 Trek 7.6 FX has a Bontrager Select 36/50 teeth crankset with 9-speed rear cogs, 11-26 teeth. I have noticed that the 2008 Trek 7.6 FX has a Shimano FC-M443 26/36/48 teeth with 9-speed rear cogs, 11-26 teeth. Why would my 2007 Trek FX have a 36/50 crankset instead of a 26/36/48 crankset? Is having only 18 speeds a significant disadvantage compared to having 27 speeds?

    Just wondering if I bought into a bad year.

  2. #2
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    In 2007 Trek was styling the 7.6 FX more like a road bike. In 2008, they changed it back to hybrid gearing. Most likely due to customer feedback and sales data.

    A lot of roadies do fine with 50/36 cranks. (or even 53/39 or 53/42). How well you do will depend upon the terrain you attempt and your physical condition. If you plan to ride a lot of hills, then you will be missing 2-3 of the lowest gears that some need. But not everyone needs them.

    Many people prefer the double crank over a triple, as it is lighter and shifts easier.

    Note that you will not be "missing" the other 6 gears, as they would be very close to gears you already have in your set of 18. There are a lot of duplicate / near-duplicate gears on a 27-speed bike.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    Sounds like a nice bike. I rode a new 7.4 this week and it was nice. It all depaends on the kind of riding you do. If you do a lot of hills, you might be geared a little high. You might want to check and see what kind of gearing an 11-34 cassette will give you. Changing over would require a new RD, cassette, and maybe a chain. This would cost about $100.

  4. #4
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    The compact versus triple crank again.

    I ride both but the triple has 50/39/30 rings on it. I also have 50/34 on the compact double. I ride on 12 to 15% hills and to be honest- there is little difference in riding the hills on either crank. 34/27 on 10 spd up the steepest hills is hard-- but no harder than 30/27. Sounds silly but once I have hit the lowest gear on either bike- I have no lower gear to hit. So I just get on and pedal to the end of the hill.

    Mind you- If you do have a problem on the steepest hills with the compact- Then as Doug64 said- change the cassette to an 11/34 (And the RD and chain) and you will have a low gear to match the triple.
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  5. #5
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
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    He could probably replace the 11-26 with a 12-28 cassette and stay with his 105 RD. I've read several reports of people running 28t, and even a couple of 29t, cogs with the 105.

    That is, if he finds his current setup doesn't work for him. If he needs just a little bit more low end, like one more gear, then the 28t mod might do it for him.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

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  6. #6
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hockman4357 View Post
    ... Is having only 18 speeds a significant disadvantage compared to having 27 speeds? ...
    I don't think so. I am a gearhead, but I have only 12 speeds, albeit nicely spaced and non-redundant, and only moderate in range (in gear-inches, typically mid 40s to mid 90s). What counts is to have reasonably small (around 6 or 7 percent) ratiometric steps across the range you really need and use. Since I never carry any gears above 100 or below 40, and since I set up my ratios without redundancy, I can get everything I need with a 2x7 14-speed setup, and almost everything I want with a 12-speed.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  7. #7
    Senior Member ecrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hockman4357 View Post
    Ok, I am a novice with regard to bike components. I purchased a used 2007 Trek 7.6 FX for $400. The bike is in like new condition. I had a tune-up at the LBS and the tech said that the bike is in mint condition.

    My question is about the crankset. My 2007 Trek 7.6 FX has a Bontrager Select 36/50 teeth crankset with 9-speed rear cogs, 11-26 teeth. I have noticed that the 2008 Trek 7.6 FX has a Shimano FC-M443 26/36/48 teeth with 9-speed rear cogs, 11-26 teeth. Why would my 2007 Trek FX have a 36/50 crankset instead of a 26/36/48 crankset? Is having only 18 speeds a significant disadvantage compared to having 27 speeds?

    Just wondering if I bought into a bad year.
    Bad year? At that price and in that condition, you got a great buy. Gear issues or not, enjoy it!

  8. #8
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    I just want to thank everyone for their input. I am really enjoying the bike, so I don't think that the gears are going to be an issue. The 18 speeds that I have really do seem like they will more than suffice.

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