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Old 07-14-09, 04:37 AM   #1
phillygal
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Looking for strategy for 65 mile ride

I am participating in my first long distance (for me) bike event on July 26. It is a flat ride from Phila to Atlantic City. I would appreciate any suggestions on riding strategies. I am a 62 yr C type rider who normally goes about 13-14 on flat surfaces. I ride about 30 miles 2-3 times per week and seem to have plenty of energy at the end of the ride. Some of my questions, should I try to accomplish more miles/hr at the start of the ride or ride my pace the whole time. How often would folks suggest stopping? Anything significant on food choices? Any other things to think about?
Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-14-09, 04:48 AM   #2
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Don't try to go faster at the start, ride your pace.
Stand and pedal or lift yourself off the saddle for a minute or so about every 15 minutes.
Take a short rest stop about every 15 miles, have a little snack. Eat what you know works for you.
Nibble while you ride if you can. You need ~ 300 cals per hour.
Remember to drink! ~ 1 bottle per hour.
Don't forget the sunscreen.
See how many new people you can meet in 60 miles!
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Old 07-14-09, 05:22 AM   #3
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Definitely do not try to ride faster at the start. Stay at a comfortable pace. If this is an organized event, there will probably be rest stops provided. If not, stop for a snack and water refill every 15 miles or so. Be sure to drink a quart or more of water before the ride and try to empty a regular sized water bottle (20 oz.) every 10 - 15 miles. Eat a good breakfast about 2 hours before the ride starts. Snack on fruits and/or pbj sandwiches during the ride. An energy bar and/or a gel pack about midway through the ride wouldn't be a bad idea.
There are many ways to do it. Pick what feels right for you. The main thing is to stay hydrated and fueled and ride within your abilities.
Have fun.
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Old 07-14-09, 05:51 AM   #4
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If you haven't done many rides over 30 miles recently, do a 45 mile ride this weekend. Then do easy rides leading up to the big ride.

On organized rides, I'm feeling good at the start, and tend to get in with a group going too fast for me. Then I pay for it near the end of the ride.

Bring an energy bar, or whatever you usually eat, just in case a rest stop near the end runs out of food, or you don't like the choices there.
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Old 07-14-09, 05:58 AM   #5
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Take some food with you on your training next ride. I take bananas & Clif bars, but take a snack food that is easy to carry and digest. Eat at every hour. It takes an hour for food and water to reach working muscles, you will need to stay ahead of the curve.

If the weather is warm be very careful to drink 2X your normal amount. Also slow your pace.

Have a good time.

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Old 07-14-09, 06:08 AM   #6
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This sounds like an interesting ride, do you have any event info?
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Old 07-14-09, 06:58 AM   #7
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Don't go out too fast, make frequent stops (not doing this is my downfall on long rides). High protein gel and some gatorade will hold you for 65 miles. You will have no problem if you pace yourself. Good luck and take some pics.
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Old 07-14-09, 07:44 AM   #8
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The event is the Irish Pub Tour da Shore. This is the link

http://irishpub.donordrive.com/index...onorDrive.Home

I appreciate all of the advice.
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Old 07-14-09, 07:59 AM   #9
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750 riders? Expect a lot of inexperienced riders that could swerve or brake suddenly. But the riders will spread out as they go, so it'll be easier to ride without a big crowd.
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Old 07-14-09, 08:11 AM   #10
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Pub to pub -- that sounds like my kind of ride. Save the Guinness until the finish.
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Old 07-14-09, 08:39 AM   #11
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Lots of good advice.
65 miles on flat terrain should not be too bad if you are already use to 30 miles on rolling terrain.
Philly can be hot & Humid in July as you know so as was stated - drink plenty of water.
Plan a ride time of 4 to 5 hours, some company to ride with - someone who will keep your pace and not push too much might help, companionship helps break the manatony and adds to the fun. Also - don't be afraid to ride behind other riders - you don't have to draft up tight agains the rear wheel but even a bike length behind helps take a lot of load of you even at 13 mph.

One mental strategy I use on a long ride where I feel really tired at the end is to look at the distance yet to go, for me I think of any distance of 18 miles or less as a walk in the park, so if I am within that distance from the end of the ride I know I can make it to the end - I keep telling myself, this is just like my normal morning ride - I do this all the time. Mentally breaking a long ride up into small segments is the key to riding distance.

Good luck - you should be fine. Let us know the result!
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Old 07-14-09, 09:05 AM   #12
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Looked at the ride web site. It does not say but have to assume that the ride is supported with rest stops and such. Talk to someone who has done the ride to see what kind of services are included. You may not want to haul extra food & water if it is available on the ride.

I would also think that such a large ride will have many riders of your fitness level etc. If you do not have a riding partner already hook on to a group of similar riders. I have done this before and not only will you make some new friends, it is much easier to do in a group.

Go for it! You only find out by testing your limits.
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Old 07-14-09, 10:30 AM   #13
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Lots of good advice here from people who know what they're talking about. I agree with it all.

Plenty of slow release carbohydrate food the night before. Spuds, hommus, stir-fry veggie noodles. Lots of water.

A good stodgy breakfast on the morning of the event, even if it's early and you don't feel like it. Oatmeal muesli, maybe porridge, with some dried fruit.

Some good portable food in your jacket or jersey pockets. Low sugar fruit-and-cereal bars. Drink water before you're thirsty.

Oh, and a musician called Mr Springsteen advised to 'Put your make-up on, fix your hair up pretty and cycle with a smile to Atlantic City' if I heard correctly, but I'm not sure I'd trust him on the subject of cycling kit. I'd suggest a helmet instead!

Don't rush at the start. Mass events can cause a euphoric wish to ride to your limits in the early miles. The best way is to finish thinking 'Could have been a bit faster', and that won't happen unless you ride the first half thinking 'This is nice and easy'.

Have a great time, and post some pictures
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Old 07-14-09, 10:55 AM   #14
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Plan on having fun and all the advice given so far!
I think you should have zero problems.
\Be safe
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Old 07-14-09, 12:20 PM   #15
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Drink a bottle of energy drink before the start- start out steady and do not get dragged into a group that is going too fast for comfort- and don't get stuck with someone too slow- Right from the start drink- then drink some more and then some again. At least a litre of water per hour- more if it is hot- and eat. And take the eats along with more drink.

And finally enjoy the ride.
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Old 07-14-09, 01:46 PM   #16
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My strategy would be to draft like crazy for the first 63 miles, then breakaway and win coming down the final stretch. Oh, that's not the advice you wanted...

If you're doing an organized ride with designated rest stops, use them all. Fill your waterbottles at each one and empty them in between. They say 19oz per half hour in hot weather. Fruit is nice, but it's never enough calories to keep me going; so I pack Power/energy bars or otherwise plan on eating *something* more substantial. If you have a HRM, keep your pulse in zone 3 or lower. If no HRM, then plan on riding 2 mph slower than your training rides.
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Old 07-14-09, 01:54 PM   #17
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Don't forget the salt if it's hot. I often make my own trail mix, with salted peanuts, raisins and M&Ms as the basic ingredients, and I add a generous pinch of salt and a smaller pinch of the no-salt (which contains potassium) as I seal the bag. Also try Sport Beans or those Clif chews for an energy/electrolyte boost toward the end.

Take your time.
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Old 07-14-09, 02:02 PM   #18
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Very good advice above.

With your frequent 30 mile rides, you should be fine. Doing a 45 mile before the big day is good advice.

You will need to drink and eat. I go for water only. Many people do some sort of energy drinks. When I eat, I prefer to eat food - oranges, apples, cookies, pretzels, fig neutons, pb&j ... really all sorts of stuff. Many people like sports bars but that seems contrived to me.

Ride at a pretty relaxed pace. If you want to and feel fresh, you can push the pace on the last 15 miles or so.

I would suggest that you stop about once per hour, briefly. It is good to get off of the pressure points. Relieve yourself if necessary. Refill your water bottles. Eat a small snack. Do not stop for very long. I find if I stop for too long, my body thinks it is over for the day and it is a bit hard to persuade it to get back to work. In your case the stops would probably be at 15, 30, and 45 miles.

It should be an adventure. Have fun.
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Old 07-14-09, 02:04 PM   #19
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Most of the comments so far have dealt with turning the pedals. IMHO, that is not as big a problem as just sitting on the bike. At 13 mph, you will have to sit on the bike for 5 hours. That can be tough on your neck, shoulders, back and butt. At rest stops your legs will recover but your butt may not as much. I suggest a couple of longer rides to get used to sitting on the bike. Also, as you increase mileage, add some stretching to your routine to keep your muscles loose.
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Old 07-14-09, 04:11 PM   #20
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I really appreciate the generosity of the group in sharing such excellent recommendations. I will now ride with a more detailed plan than I would have developed on my own. Again thanks, and I will post a report when the ride completes.
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Old 07-14-09, 06:52 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phillygal View Post
I really appreciate the generosity of the group in sharing such excellent recommendations. I will now ride with a more detailed plan than I would have developed on my own. Again thanks, and I will post a report when the ride completes.
If you can bring a camera, this bunch likes photos of rides
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Old 07-16-09, 12:20 PM   #22
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When they signal the start, start pedaling.

When you reach the end, stop pedaling.

In between, keep pedaling.
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Old 07-16-09, 02:10 PM   #23
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One more piece of advice.

Don't do anything new for the first time for this ride. Nothing!

I.e., if you want to follow the advice about drinking the energy drink before the ride, TRY IT AHEAD OF TIME.

Some folks get really sick on certain energy drinks, Don't let the 65 mile ride be the time to find out that you do also.

Don't adjust your seat, change your chain, adjust your derraileurs, or do anything that you haven't tested on a couple of rides before this one.
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Old 07-17-09, 09:20 AM   #24
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Lucky! I grew up in a Jersey suburb of Philly and always wanted to do a ride to the shore but moved away before it ever happened. I'm jealous!

65 miles without hills isn't too bad. Everyone above pretty much gave the advice I would.
-Ride your pace
-eat and drink the whole way -- drink even when you aren't thirsty
-wear sunscreen
-wear eye protection the whole time
-don't try anything "new" (this is huge)
-make sure the bike is in good shape
-pack light. You need a couple of tubes, a multi-tool, levers, and a pump/co2 thingee regardless, but really nothing else. Throw your license, a credit card, cell phone, and a $20 in a sandwich baggie and leave the rest at home.

Is this ride supported?
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Old 07-17-09, 12:31 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
One more piece of advice.

Don't do anything new for the first time for this ride. Nothing!
I.e., if you want to follow the advice about drinking the energy drink before the ride, TRY IT AHEAD OF TIME.

Some folks get really sick on certain energy drinks, Don't let the 65 mile ride be the time to find out that you do also.

Don't adjust your seat, change your chain, adjust your derraileurs, or do anything that you haven't tested on a couple of rides before this one.
+1 Sound advice. Finding out on a long ride that a new gel, energydrink, etc doesn't agree with your system is not pleasant -- been there, done that, got the t-shirt. Same applies to changing/adjusting bike mechanicals, different shorts, new socks ........ well you get the idea.

Stay hydrated, ride your pace & have fun!!!!
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