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Old 08-01-09, 05:23 AM   #1
wobblyoldgeezer
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Solo ride this morning

Mrs G went back to UK on Thursday. She's been moving number one son out of his student flat - How'd that happen so soon, I seem to have a boy with a BSc in Geology. One of those life stage things!

I was out from 7 to 10.30, fairly long ride, I guess maybe 100 km. Warm but not overwhelming, a bit windy but not too much. Different to be out on my own, I enjoy the social aspect of riding with the Mrs but I also like riding a bit longer, harder and warmer than she does. She's a Californian from the Santa Cruz area, and her permissable thermostat range is 75 to 77 F !

Just nice. Nothing too hard, but a good stretch, about 140 bpm all the way. Hope you all had a good outing too.

That's all!
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Old 08-01-09, 10:25 AM   #2
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Is your riding in Bahrain similar to the US desert southwest?
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Old 08-02-09, 09:07 AM   #3
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Is your riding in Bahrain similar to the US desert southwest?
I'm afraid I really don't know, but thanks for asking. My cycling in USA has been Washington DC, NYC and California Bay Area to pacific coast, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Cruz - and some outings in the Sierras, Sonora, Pinecrest, Strawberry

Bahrain isn't like any of those places. It's a small sandy island, mainly flat. Our mountain, Jebel Dhukan (translated as Smokey Hill because of the sandy dust clouds) is an enormous 300 feet or so above sea level.

Summer temperature up to 110 F. Occasionally more. Normally this time of year humidity is high, up to and beyond 80%, but this year the humidity is a bit late, so it's pleasant so far. October to March, temperature and humidity is delightful. Not a scenic place, though
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Old 08-02-09, 10:15 AM   #4
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Mr G is being kind. While I have not ridden a bike in that part of the world, I did spend a little time working in Saudi, Kuwait, and the UAE way back in the late 80's. When asked what the summer weather was like there I only had one way to describe it. Take the biggest, baddest hair dryer you can find. Turn it on high and let it get heated up for about 10 minutes. Then turn it so it blows straight at your face. That was the best analogy I could find. It might not be as bad on Bahrain since it is an island.

The water there is beautiful and it is an interesting place.

Mr G - congratulations on your son's graduation from university. I know you must be proud of him.
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Old 08-02-09, 10:21 AM   #5
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My neighbor says he is a professional jet-ski racer, and he spends the summers racing jet-skis in Bahrain. Is jet-ski racing big over there?
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Old 08-02-09, 02:25 PM   #6
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My neighbor says he is a professional jet-ski racer, and he spends the summers racing jet-skis in Bahrain. Is jet-ski racing big over there?
Should think anything that that sprays you with water in that heat is fine.

Have to admit that I can take heat up to around 100 but once the humidity starts rising- I wilt. Can't get enough water into me till I take salt or Isotonics- so how do you cater for the high humidity? Do you take supplements or just suffer?
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Old 08-03-09, 06:53 AM   #7
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AdrianL - Yes, it can certainly get hot. A colleague in Saudi for the first time likened it to walking along with a 3-bar electric fire on each shoulder! And many thanks for your congratulations - we are both proud of him, he's a good lad!
TromboneAl - there's certainly a lot of keen jet skiers, but I'm not aware of professional races. It wouldn't surprise me, but I haven't seen any publicity - and it's a small place where something like a change in a restaurant menu gets in the papers!
Stapfam - how to cater for high humidity? I use a lot of gatoraide and isostar as well as water. And I guess people are just different in how they react. Back as a runner, my 3 fastest marathons were Singapore, Jakarta and New York, all hot and humid. Slowest, London, Paris and San Francisco, all coolish and dry. I remember Paris in particular, shivering uncontrollably, almost hypothermic on a sunny spring morning, high 60s F! I'm not exactly blubbery now, but back then I was a chopstick. No insulation at all
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Old 08-03-09, 12:56 PM   #8
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solo rides rock!
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Old 08-03-09, 01:41 PM   #9
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Stapfam - how to cater for high humidity? I use a lot of gatoraide and isostar as well as water. And I guess people are just different in how they react. Back as a runner, my 3 fastest marathons were Singapore, Jakarta and New York, all hot and humid. Slowest, London, Paris and San Francisco, all coolish and dry. I remember Paris in particular, shivering uncontrollably, almost hypothermic on a sunny spring morning, high 60s F! I'm not exactly blubbery now, but back then I was a chopstick. No insulation at all
I worked in France for a time and was based around Calais. In other words- no different to the UK except the food was better, Summers and Racing did not work for me in that region. Eventually I got onto salt tablets and they worked. One memorable 24hour race I did was at Mulhouse. This was pre salt the first year and the heat got through to me. Not the heat but the humidity did.

Then I went to the South of France on the med and boy was it different. They say the heat is different abroad (i.e. In Europe) and this was.

Since getting into cycling- I got onto Isostar and as an Isotonic it is the best yet that I have found. It does work and I like the taste. I now use Leppin as I like the taste better and it is also an energy drink. Something I find I am lacking after a few hours on the bike.
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