Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 41 of 41
  1. #26
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,713
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianL View Post
    Other than spinning classes, faced with Minn. winters, I would get a trainer even thought most people here may disagree. At least it is a way to continue to ride and get the exercise.
    I don't think most of us would disagree with having a trainer. We have them. We use them and we hate them.

    One thing my trainer does for me is to convince me to go out and ride in rain or cold. It has to be pretty bad outside to be worse than riding the trainer.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  2. #27
    Fran & Nanette McQz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ridin' 'round the corner in Winslow, AZ
    My Bikes
    Gary Fisher Wingra, 30 yr old KHS Mountain Bike, Used Yakima traile
    Posts
    231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
    It has to be pretty bad outside to be worse than riding the trainer.

    Amen brother!
    The difference between "Bold" and "Stupid"
    is often measured by the severity of your injuries.

    63 yr old MTB newbie and his lovely bride

    His: '08 Roubaix S-Works, ''11 Stumpjumper FSR Comp, '11 TriCross Comp, '11 Globe SS with Brooks B-17W saddle
    Hers:'08 Ruby Pro, '11 Safire FSR Comp, '11 TriCross Comp, '11 Skinny Benny SS with Brooks B-17 saddle
    Theirs: '10 Breezer 3-speed commuter

  3. #28
    Senior Member ntime60's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    My Bikes
    Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    94
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnMan View Post
    The faster cadence is, for now, more tiring, not less. And the faster I pedal, the harder is is for me to concentrate on pulling back during the understroke, etc.

    Probably my biggest challenge is going to be how to stay fit in the winter. I really enjoy my rides, but this is Minnesota. Half a year of bitter cold, early darkness, and terrible road conditions are not my idea of fun. And neither is the gym. It's just not the same...
    I'm right there with ya. I just started this year (May) myself. I found unlike my boyhood years, these new bikes are cool and the tech toys are fun to play with. When I started, I came here and read people spinning at 80-100+ when I was spinning around 50 rpm. I was a bit intimidated by all that. Now I'm consistently spinning 70-80 and it does get easier, especially when you DON'T think about it.

    What works for me is to do what feels right and everything else will sort itself out.

    I have a Cateye Strada /w cadence cyclocomputer and I usually keep it on speed and cadence for a quick look at what I think I'm doing. Concentrate on a smooth circle. Start out slow, real slow, the type of slow that makes you feel guilty or you're not accomplishing anything.

    Establish a good feel for the pedaling circle. I had to move my saddle forward a bit, tilt the nose down a bit and raise it to get my pedaling to feel easy and to not be so hard on my back and sit bones.

    Once you are comfortable your cadence will increase naturally. The thing is it takes time, a lot more time than us noobs are prepared for, to improve. The body is a self regulating mechanism and like with all things to change what it is used to required muscle memory and to train that requires time and practice. The self regulation will increase as your muscle memory improves.

    Most of all have fun at it first.

    BTW I'm going to buy a hydro trainer for our winter months and concentrate on my core exercises through he winter.
    2009 Trek 7.3 (Black), Cateye Strada /w cadence. My Cycling Adventures

  4. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    My Bikes
    Trek Medone 5.2 Dont forget the Res white and Blue a Trek 7100 Hybrid and Silvr vinage Aluminum Trek with Downrail shifterand wheels that wont stay true
    Posts
    151
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think if you're under 15 mph on the flat you should just find the biggest cliff in Minnesota and drive over it ! Of course that would be all of a 6 foot drop !

  5. #30
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,812
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tsl View Post
    DF's suggestion of spin classes could work, if you're both competitive and social. I'm neither, so I'm not a gym kind of guy.
    Spinning classes are NOT competitive, unless one makes them so.

    In the classes I go to in the winter time, a lot of folks do exactly what they want. One guy grinds in max resistance the whole 50 minutes. Others are standing almost the whole time. Some sit a lot, as I do.

    You adjust the tension to whatever YOU want. If you feel self-conscious, you can just pretend to turn the knob up when the instructor says to increase resistance, and then smile as if it is easy. Yes, I've done that.

    Be prepared for a lot of very "in condition" - that is "in-condition for spinning classes" ladies in their 50's - 60's - 70's who will wipe you out if you try to keep up with them.

    However, a whole lot of them don't even own a bike, and have never seen a trail.

    Overall, it is a lot better for me than grinding away in the basement, even though I have a nice basement.
    YMMV
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  6. #31
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,591
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spinning classes- sounds like a great idea. I teach at the university and there all kinds of spinning classes at the Rec Center- I just looked it up. Then again, they're filled with 20 year olds. Not exactly my crowd.

  7. #32
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,812
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnMan View Post
    Spinning classes- sounds like a great idea. I teach at the university and there all kinds of spinning classes at the Rec Center- I just looked it up. Then again, they're filled with 20 year olds. Not exactly my crowd.

    Not around here. Here they are filled with 50, 60, 70 and a couple of 80 year-olds. Why not ask at the rec registration?
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  8. #33
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,591
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    Not around here. Here they are filled with 50, 60, 70 and a couple of 80 year-olds. Why not ask at the rec registration?
    No, they'll all be really young - it's the University rec center. It's ok, I'll deal with it. After years being middle aged on a university campus, you get used to being invisible - that's a topic for another thread or really another forum, but there it is - working at a University: every year you get older while everybody around you stays the same age.

    The classes sound like just what I need and they're a 3 minute walk from my office. I'll go for it.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    rockford, il
    My Bikes
    Trek 7700, C'dale R2000
    Posts
    2,646
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Any kind of road or trail biking offers lots of distractions.
    That is why a trainer or spinning class is good. You can strap on your HRM, go 90 RPM at HR 120 for 1 hour. No BS and no excuses.
    The result will be distance traveled in that hour or calories burned.
    I just did such a session on a recumbent trainer. I burned 750 calories in that hour and my knees hurt.
    That translates to over 20 MPH on my Trek Madone on flat ground and no wind. I have done that also.

  10. #35
    HenryL HenryL's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fanwood, NJ
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Road 700, Windcheetah recumbent trike, Falcon 531 steel road bike, beater fixed gear bike, Van Dessell Straight up x 7
    Posts
    159
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I started at your age 7 years ago. Recently I was told building cycling legs is a 2 year process. I agree. Just ride, watch others and learn. I started riding alone and chased average speed, then chased distance. When I started riding with a group I thought I was ready, ready to be dropped like a bad habit.

    Enjoy riding, work on cadence as you do, spinning easy gears gets you to the same place with less effort and it will help build your cardio. 6 or 8 months down the road, start working intervals into your riding (search threads for that topic) Also, find some hills and climb them. Then do it again and again and again. You will be much stronger for it.

  11. #36
    Road Nazi Hunter Donegal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Slow! But Ahead of You.
    My Bikes
    Kuota Kredo, Litespeed Vortex, Aegis Victory, Burley Tandem, Cannondale Rush
    Posts
    409
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cadence is personal. 100 for Lance and Lance wannabe's, 75-80 for those that follow Jan Ullrich's type of riding. Jan Ullrich was only the second best rider in the world for 4-5 years. Your physiology will determine what works for you.

    You have gotten a lot of good advice about pedaling in circles, not mashing like two pistons. I spent 2 years increasing my cadence, allways over 90-95 on the trainer, avg. 90 on the road. I specifically sped up my feet during training and on all the roads. I got slower and slower as I lost power spinning with these two big legs. Most neophytes do pedal too slowly, but everyone must respond to their bodies. This year, I have switched back to a cadence of 80-85 and sometimes in a big gear I run all the way down to around 75. My heart rate stays lower and I can push a pretty strong gear. It took my buddy running 400-500 watts to keep up with me on a hill and I outweigh him by 30 lbs. The moral of the story is that we are all different. Ride, Ride some more, and ride even more. There is only one way to get better, "time in the saddle". Be Patient, build muscle and technique by travelling down the road on your bike and enjoying the time with your friends.
    Rubber Side Down Racing Team
    My Other Home:http://DonGaleHomes.com

  12. #37
    Senior Member Dchiefransom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Newark, CA. San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    6,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnMan View Post
    Spinning classes- sounds like a great idea. I teach at the university and there all kinds of spinning classes at the Rec Center- I just looked it up. Then again, they're filled with 20 year olds. Not exactly my crowd.

    I think it's been stated before that spinning uses the cardio a bit more than mashing does, but is easier on the knees. Just find a comfortable rpm to pedal at and try to maintain that at a pace that's moderate for YOU. Just ride a lot, and someday you'll realize that you're going faster in a different gear for the same effort.
    Go ahead and sign up for the spin classes with the younger folk. Stay at the back of the class, but tell your wife/girlfriend that you're in the front.
    Silver Eagle Pilot

  13. #38
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,713
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Donegal View Post
    Cadence is personal...
    ...Most neophytes do pedal too slowly, but everyone must respond to their bodies...
    ...The moral of the story is that we are all different...

    Very true. I try to stay away from the idea of a prescribed cadence being the answer for everyone. When I first started riding a lot as an adult, I bought a cadence reading computer to see how I was doing compared to the advice I read in magazines to spin 80 to 90 rpm. I was shocked to see that I was usually mashing along at 50 to 60. Gradually I progressed to being able to spin at 90 rpm comfortably, but most of the time I felt better around 80. But at times I found it helpful to speed up to 90 or 100 rpm. I tend to stay somewhere between 70 and 90 rpm now.

    What I came to focus more on was making sure I was in a gear I could "stay on top of". This meant that I should never let my rpm get so low that I could not accelerate. This was especially important on hills, but even on flats, I found that I was most effective if I was able to increase my speed if I tried. I find that to be a better way to gauge my pedaling than knowing my cadence number.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  14. #39
    Council of the Elders billydonn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    My Bikes
    1990 Schwinn Crosscut, 5 Lemonds
    Posts
    3,761
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HenryL View Post
    I started at your age 7 years ago. Recently I was told building cycling legs is a 2 year process. I agree. Just ride, watch others and learn. I started riding alone and chased average speed, then chased distance. When I started riding with a group I thought I was ready, ready to be dropped like a bad habit.

    Enjoy riding, work on cadence as you do, spinning easy gears gets you to the same place with less effort and it will help build your cardio. 6 or 8 months down the road, start working intervals into your riding (search threads for that topic) Also, find some hills and climb them. Then do it again and again and again. You will be much stronger for it.
    Wow... what excellent advice!

    There is a time to resign oneself
    to old age and infirmity. You first.
    My Cycling Blogspot

  15. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Maumee, Ohio (near Toledo)
    My Bikes
    Rans Stratus XP, Trek 740 hybrid
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're just getting back into biking, this site may be of interest: http://www.biketoledo.net.
    rsbeach

  16. #41
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    My Bikes
    Terraferma 650b, Mondonico SL and ELOS, Masi Gran Criterium, Trek 610, Breezer Liberty, Georgena Terry Classic
    Posts
    11,000
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    First off, let me say that you are doing great. You are riding a nice distance. You are doing it routinely. And you are enjoying it.

    As others have said, you should learn how to spin your pedals.

    Currently, you are riding a 50 tooth chain ring in your 3rd smallest cog which I guess is 15. To get chain inches that is 50/15 times 27 (wheel diameter) = 90. At 90 chain inches and 100 rpm, you would be going 27 mph. By you are going 13 mph which means your rpm is about 48. That is about what one would expect for a neophyte rider.

    An experienced rider can cruise for hours at a cadence of over 100 rpm. Everyone has their preferred cadence. Lemond liked to ride in the low 80s. I believe Armstrong rides in the low 100s. Riding a high rpm allows a cyclist to generate power on a sustainable basis. But it takes some time to develop the ability as others have said above.

    Something to do when you is practicing increasing your cadence. Concentrate on spinning your legs faster. You will probably feel your quads burning. Back off a bit. I think over time, the quads develop more capillaries which allows more blood flow so you can sustain a higher spin. It took me a whole summer to develop a decent spin and that was riding a bunch of miles. But keep at it, it will come.

    As for your toe clips, you should do more than push down your pedals. What happens is many riders use the power stroke to push up the foot on the recovery stroke. You should think of lifting the foot on the recovery stroke whilst pushing on the other foot on the power stroke. A lot of people describe this as "pedalling in circles". The whole point of toe clips is to have your feet firmly connected to the pedals so you can develop a smooth spin.

    Clipless pedals provide a better connection to the pedals than toe clips. But toe clips work just fine. Another aide to a better spin is a bike computer that gives a cadence read out. That will provide you with an instant read out of your current spin which is a great learning device.

    I learned to spin before cadence computers so I calculated the mph at 100 rpm for each of my chain ring and cog combinations and arranged those in 2 columns and taped it to my spin. That way I could glance at my current gear and look at the table and figure out how close I was to 100 rpm. It worked reasonably well and was dirt cheap.
    I think this post has a lot of good advice, and I agree, you're doing really well.

    I'd like to add a few feasible pedaling techniques that help to make good circles - at teh bottom of each pedal stroke, pull your foot back gently, like you're scraping mud off your sole. It helps to remember to change stroke direction, but don't pull your foot out of the clip - that's too severe a pull. Then lift your knee toward the handlebar on teh upstroke, then lead your toe forward over the top.

    You've found that pulling up with power is not a sustainable operation. I've found the same thing, and I think it's telling that Bernard Hinault in his book Road Racing, does not advocate this. I do think the gentle elements of pedaling in circles are sustainable, and you can practice these techniques as you pedal your 80 rpm. Do it when there's nothing more important to think about, such as traffic.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •