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Old 09-05-09, 05:25 PM   #1
yrrej
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What is like the Specialized Sequoia but much lighter?

Hi,

I have a specialized sequoia comp, about 21 pounds, before I add the
(full) seatbag and bento box.

I like the more upright position ( 71 years old ), about 2-3 miles in the
drops gets old pretty fast.

There are hills in every direction and I would like something that would
help me get up the hills in a quicker easier fashion...

So, what are some choices ( CF, Ti...) of a lighter bike with a sequoia style
geometry ( ie handle bar tops almost even with seat top) that would not
break the bank ( ~2500.00).

I realize that at 205~209 pounds that I will never be a hill slayer. Unfortunately
my metabolism died a couple of years ago and it is unlikely that I will ever
be under 200 pounds.

I target three rides a week from 20-28 miles with about 500~1000 feet of elevation
gain. My body demands a day off after a ride. I have been riding since Nov 2008.

Here is a profile of todays ride:


Thanks,

Jerry
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Old 09-05-09, 05:37 PM   #2
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One thought that comes to mind is the Cannondale Quick, which is your garden breed hybrid. In the 2010 line, they are offering a full carbon model, which might be of interest. Don't know what the price tag is!
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Old 09-05-09, 06:27 PM   #3
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I think you're going to find it hard to trim much more than a pound or two by getting a new bike unless you spend enough to go pretty high-end. Probably more cost-effective to identify a few components on the Sequoia that could be lighter and just replace those. First things I'd target would be the 'full seat bag' and Bento Box - what's in these and do you really need everything for a 25 mile ride? Do you carry two water bottles but only ever drink from one of them - if so that alone could save a pound and a half.
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Old 09-05-09, 08:41 PM   #4
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I think you're going to find it hard to trim much more than a pound or two by getting a new bike unless you spend enough to go pretty high-end. Probably more cost-effective to identify a few components on the Sequoia that could be lighter and just replace those. First things I'd target would be the 'full seat bag' and Bento Box - what's in these and do you really need everything for a 25 mile ride? Do you carry two water bottles but only ever drink from one of them - if so that alone could save a pound and a half.
Yes I need everything...The seat bag contains a tube and tire tools.
The bento bag contains my fig newtons and cell phone.

I do need and carry one water bottle... We geezers dehydrate very
easily.

If you look at the elevation profile I posted in my opening post you will see there is a
very steep downhill. I have to use the brakes a lot in order to keep the speed under
40 mph.

The first time I went down the hill, when I got to the bottom I stopped and snacked. When
I mounted the bike I discovered I had a flat...The tube around the stem had a couple of
small holes. If I did not have the tools it would have been a 10 mile walk to home.

If the tube had failed on the way down the hill I would have been toast

Not too much can be done to the bike. It has a carbon seat post, fork, and seat stays all
with zertz inserts.

The wheels are Shimano WHRS10s with ( 16f/20r) aero spokes.

The bike reminders me more of a tank than a speedy bike

Jerry
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Old 09-06-09, 12:16 AM   #5
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Plenty of bikes that will be lighter than the Sequoia but it is getting the geometry the same that could be a problem. Two bikes spring to mind but they could take changes of parts to get somewhere near your riding position. The Specialised Roubaix seems to be a favourite on this forum and the Other is the Giant OCR-C range.

Both of these may require a riser stem for the bars to bring the bar up to your height. It would help if you could post a picture of your bike so we can see how you have it set up.

Attachment is of the Giant OCR C2 belonging to SKT and this is a fairly light bike but has now been superceded by the Defy range. There was a recent posting on Giant bikes that made me realise how popular they are. Several pictures of the set up that some members have.

Any opinions from the 50+ group on Giant road bikes? They always get good reviews.

But the other popular bike here is the Roubaix. It can be had in various forms and perhaps some others can post pics of their bikes with their setup to give you an idea of how they run them


http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/...ad/2264/32186/

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...jsp?spid=33105
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File Type: jpg Giant.jpg (71.7 KB, 11 views)
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Old 09-06-09, 12:43 AM   #6
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Based on the weights given here:
http://www.thebicycleescape.com/bicycleweights.html

the Giant would save less than a pound and most of the Roubaix series would be in the 1 - 2 pound area (the Expert model would be a little more but is also outside the price range specified). That slight amount of weight reduction isn't going to have much of an effect on the speed or ease of the specified course.
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Old 09-06-09, 03:02 AM   #7
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Something wrong on those tables and the one I looked at- The Giant OCRC2 and 1. The 1 in medium is heavier than the 2 in extra large. But an OCR1 in the same size would be lighter than the OCR2- and that is just on the better components.

But Take it that say the Roubaix is the same weight as a Sequoia---The differences on the two bikes in riding is tremendous. I found this out when I got the TCR-C after having had Boreas for 6 months. Boreas is just over 15lbs and is lightweight aluminium. The TCR is C.F. and 16lbs. Set up on the bikes is similar but they ride differently. Both ride good but the TCR goes up hills better.

Now compare the TCR and my OCR3 at 19 1/2 lbs- And they might just as well be a Clunker and a full race bike. Only a bit of weight difference and I do realise that weight counts. But the way the two bikes ride is tremendous. I could put 10lbs on the TCR and it would still be the better riding bike.

As bikes go up the range- they do improve. Both on spec and ridability.
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Old 09-06-09, 06:23 AM   #8
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You might look around for a deal on a 2009 Roubaix. The higher up the model line you go the lighter and better it will ride. I like mine. It is a great all around bike.
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Old 09-06-09, 07:14 AM   #9
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21 pounds used to be a pretty lightweight bike. I'm thinking that, relative to weight reduction, all of the low hanging fruit has already been picked.

An ounce = 28.4 grams. Find 16 replacement components that are each 30 grams lighter and you can reduce the weight of your bike by over a pound. The lightest water bottle cages, for example, weigh around 20 or 30 grams. Typical water bottle cages weigh around 60 or 65 grams. As you can see, it's not all that hard to do shave 30 grams on almost every single component.

Cost is another thing entirely. One of my favorite road bikes weighs around 24 pounds. I know I could easily reduce that by a pound or maybe even two pounds. All it takes is money. Keep in mind however, that unless you do everything at once, you aren't going to feel any difference. 16 ounces at maybe $50/00 (or more) per ounce = $800.00. For me, the cost/benefit ratio just isn't there.
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Old 09-06-09, 08:54 AM   #10
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I'm a few years younger than you, but live in steeper terrain and fight the same gravity...
Are you sure weight is the problem? Twenty-one pounds doesn't sound oppressive to me. I've never weighed my Atlantis, but it's a 64cm steel frame with heavy accessories (Brooks saddle, stout wheels, racks, usually fenders etc)--I'd be surprised if it doesn't come close to 30 pounds. When I add that to my 250, the total bike-rider package is 280 pounds. Even if the frame were three pounds lighter (impossible; it only weighs about 5 to start with), that would only be a reduction of around 1 percent. I wouldn't feel it, and I doubt most riders could. It's the equivalent of breakfast plus a water bottle.
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Old 09-06-09, 08:55 AM   #11
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Get a new bike if you like because you want a new bike. N+1 is a great thing. At your weight and with all the stuff you like to carry with you, a lighter bike will not make you a better hill climber.

If you want to climb hills better, climb more hills. Work on your fitness, strength and skills.
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Old 09-06-09, 09:34 AM   #12
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There are hills in every direction and I would like something that would
help me get up the hills in a quicker easier fashion


The same thing that will get you to Carnegie Hall will get you up the hills faster..............practice

As others have stated you already have a nice bike. If it fits you well and you are very comfortable on it maybe you should try some lighter wheels and tubless light weight tires. If you buy a new bike I would definately keep the one you have. I have two bikes and find that I ride the most comfortable one more than I ride the "light" one.
Whatever you do, we want to see pics.
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Old 09-06-09, 10:59 AM   #13
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Another possibility is to keep your Sequoia and swap in a Deore XT RD, so that you can use 11x32 or 11x34 casette.
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Old 09-06-09, 11:23 AM   #14
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There are hills in every direction and I would like something that would
help me get up the hills in a quicker easier fashion


The same thing that will get you to Carnegie Hall will get you up the hills faster..............practice

As others have stated you already have a nice bike. If it fits you well and you are very comfortable on it maybe you should try some lighter wheels and tubless light weight tires. If you buy a new bike I would definately keep the one you have. I have two bikes and find that I ride the most comfortable one more than I ride the "light" one.
Whatever you do, we want to see pics.
I am practicing as hard as my body will permit, in addition practice time is limited due to
my wife's severe health problems.

Here is a picture of my 56cm 'tank':
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File Type: jpg SequoiaCompSmall.jpg (97.0 KB, 43 views)
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Old 09-06-09, 01:14 PM   #15
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Hi all, Mr. Yen here.

I am about yrrej's age and have a Roubaix Expert Triple which I modified with an adjustable stem and mountain bike style bars so it would be comfortable enough to ride with my artificial shoulder. I can now ride it without pain.

I am not sure a lighter bike makes enough difference in climbing that I would invest the money again in a bike as light as it is. With mods it comes in at about 18 lbs. It is a 61.

My reasoning comes from the fact that my other bikes are a Trek 7500 (hybrid) and an old 1972 model Schwinn Sports Tourer (a ten speed). They both weigh about 35 lbs. I have found that climbing hills is not significantly different on any of them. Maybe a half to one mph. So I believe that any difference is due to gearing or fitness and not bike weight. My weight is about 175.

We have a climb here that is about 7 miles of continuous climb with no breaks in the uphill slope and I have climbed it on the Trek. Locally it is known as GMR.

I think I would look into a more advantageous gear set for the Sequoia. I have even considered getting a Sequoia for myself. Either that or a Surly Long Haul Trucker. The Sequoia because of the better (for me) geometry than the Roubaix and the Trucker for its lower gearing. Yen can spin up hills on her LHT easier than on her Roubaix Expert Triple using the middle ring in the front on both bikes. The Roubaix is faster for her on the flats but probably insignificant since we ride only for pleasure and/or fitness. No racing.

The Surly is a steel frame bike.

Hope this info helps in your decision process.
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Old 09-06-09, 03:05 PM   #16
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Hi all, Mr. Yen here.



My reasoning comes from the fact that my other bikes are a Trek 7500 (hybrid) and an old 1972 model Schwinn Sports Tourer (a ten speed). They both weigh about 35 lbs. I have found that climbing hills is not significantly different on any of them. Maybe a half to one mph. So I believe that any difference is due to gearing or fitness and not bike weight. My weight is about 175.

I think I would look into a more advantageous gear set for the Sequoia. I have even considered getting a Sequoia for myself. Either that or a Surly Long Haul Trucker. The Sequoia because of the better (for me) geometry than the Roubaix and the Trucker for its lower gearing. Yen can spin up hills on her LHT easier than on her Roubaix Expert Triple using the middle ring in the front on both bikes. The Roubaix is faster for her on the flats but probably insignificant since we ride only for pleasure and/or fitness. No racing.

Hope this info helps in your decision process.
Hi,

I bought a Schwinn Sports Tourer back in the early seventies and I really enjoyed it But then
I was seduced by the Dark Side and bought a motorcycle ( Kawasaki Z1a).

As I recall my Sports Tourer was a bright orange...Could you post a picture of yours?

My Sequoia has a SRAM 11x28 rear cog set and the front is 50x39x30.

It looks like I might as well bite the bullet and hang with the Sequoia Comp...

Jerry
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Old 09-06-09, 03:44 PM   #17
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You could check out the Cannondale Synapse carbon bikes. They are designed for comfort, but perhaps not to the same degree as the Sequoia.

Trek had some bikes with the more relaxed geometry, but they've backed off of them a bit. Their Pilot series has a couple of them, but they are roughly equal to the Sequoias. They still have comfort-oriented higher end road bikes, but not as relaxed as they did 2-3 years ago. Raleigh had some out a couple of years ago too, with carbon frames, but dropped them.

I think the bike companies have found it difficult to sell a sufficient quantity of more expensive, lightweight, ultra-comfortable road bikes. They apparently have found a market for moderately comfortable, higher end bikes, like the Specialized Roubaix, Cannondale Synapse, and some of the Trek Madones.
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Old 09-06-09, 04:06 PM   #18
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I think the bike companies have found it difficult to sell a sufficient quantity of more expensive, lightweight, ultra-comfortable road bikes. They apparently have found a market for moderately comfortable, higher end bikes, like the Specialized Roubaix, Cannondale Synapse, and some of the Trek Madones.
Yeah,

I understand that Specialized has discontinued the Sequoia...

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Old 09-06-09, 04:12 PM   #19
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Gary Fisher has a new bike called the Chronus. It's a performance bike with relaxed geometry like the Roubaix. But it will take a 27c or 28c tire which gives a nice ride.
They have a couple videos about the design. I want to try one.

http://fisherbikes.com/bike/model/cronus-pro
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Old 09-06-09, 09:44 PM   #20
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Hi,

I bought a Schwinn Sports Tourer back in the early seventies and I really enjoyed it But then
I was seduced by the Dark Side and bought a motorcycle ( Kawasaki Z1a).

As I recall my Sports Tourer was a bright orange...Could you post a picture of yours?

...
It's lime green, brighter than this picture...

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Old 09-07-09, 06:18 AM   #21
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I'm a few years younger than you, but live in steeper terrain and fight the same gravity...
Are you sure weight is the problem? Twenty-one pounds doesn't sound oppressive to me. I've never weighed my Atlantis, but it's a 64cm steel frame with heavy accessories (Brooks saddle, stout wheels, racks, usually fenders etc)--I'd be surprised if it doesn't come close to 30 pounds. When I add that to my 250, the total bike-rider package is 280 pounds. Even if the frame were three pounds lighter (impossible; it only weighs about 5 to start with), that would only be a reduction of around 1 percent. I wouldn't feel it, and I doubt most riders could. It's the equivalent of breakfast plus a water bottle.
+1
Try this- have a sag vehicle with you, and ride the route without the seatbag, water bottle, and bento, whatever you can to shave a pound or two. See if you notice the difference.

Invest in a training program- even a minimal one will have great results (unless you're already using a structured training program).
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Old 09-07-09, 06:28 AM   #22
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There are hills in every direction and I would like something that would
help me get up the hills in a quicker easier fashion...
Giant Twist Express.

HTH,
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Old 09-07-09, 08:47 AM   #23
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Yeah,

I understand that Specialized has discontinued the Sequoia...

Jerry
...and are replacing it with the Sectuer.

Last edited by BluesDawg; 09-07-09 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 09-07-09, 09:38 AM   #24
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It's lime green, brighter than this picture...

Sigh..

Brings back a lot of fond memories...I had toe clips on mine. Did not fall a single time...

Seems like I remember more than 10 total gears...did they ever come with a 7 gear
rear cassette?

Thanks,

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Old 09-07-09, 12:08 PM   #25
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Yen here... answering for Mr. Yen:

He doesn't think so, but the Paramount might have had 14 speeds.
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