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Old 09-06-09, 06:35 PM   #1
gcottay
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When Do We Get Old?

One cyclist says it's when we quit exercising.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) If Gene Teaney were a satellite and not a cyclist, he'd be on his fifth orbit of Earth by now.

Teaney, 66, recently pedaled his 100,000th mile since taking up bicycling as a fitness activity in 1988. He knows exactly how many miles he's ridden because, for the past 21 years, he's logged each and every one.

"I started keeping logs because I was taking part in the (Union) Carbide Fitness Club," he said as he took a brief break during a three-hour ride in and around Kanawha State Forest. "I started out as a runner, but took up cycling when I started having problems with shin splints. Cycling was good cross-training, and it was a lot easier on my legs."

After Teaney retired from Carbide in 2001, he redoubled his cycling efforts.

"Two or three times a week, I do solo rides that average 50 to 55 miles apiece. And two or three times a week, I also take part in rides with the Mountain State Wheelers (Bicycle Club)," he said.

Believe it or not, that's less than he's accustomed to riding. From 2002 to 2005, Teaney averaged more than 10,000 miles a year. He did two west-to-east transcontinental rides - one of 3,500 miles, the other of 3,700. He did three north-south crossings of the United States - one along the Eastern Seaboard, one along the Mississippi River, and one along the West Coast. He took part in 13 cycling tours that lasted more than five days. Six of those lasted 20 to 50 days.

"I've ridden in 49 states and three Canadian provinces," he said. "The only state I haven't ridden in yet is Hawaii."

Nowadays Teaney averages "only" 7,500 miles a year mainly because, as he put it, "I've done all the tours I'm interested in."

Some cyclists like to ride the latest and greatest in bicycle technology. Teaney has had the same titanium-framed Litespeed Vortex since 1999. The bike now has 78,000 miles on its odometer.

"I sent it back to the factory two years ago to have it refurbished. The components were pretty much worn out. Everything is new now except the frame," he said.

Three years ago, Teaney started wondering exactly how many miles he'd accumulated down through the years. He got out his logs and began adding up the totals.

"At that time, I had about 81,000," he said. "I decided that 100,000 miles was reachable, and I made that my next goal."

He rolled past the epic milestone July 21, on a routine solo ride near his South Hills home. He said he felt a sense of achievement, but he added that he now has no specific goal to pursue.

"I guess now the goal is to keep healthy and get plenty of exercise," he said.

The health part shouldn't be a problem. Teaney's resting pulse rate is a turtle-slow 50 beats a minute, a telltale sign of a high fitness level.

"People ask me about riding at this age," he said. "I tell them, 'we don't quit exercising when we get old; we get old when we quit exercising.'"
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Old 09-07-09, 06:15 AM   #2
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We get old when our mind matches our body. Keep that from happening and you never will.
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Old 09-07-09, 07:29 AM   #3
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Age is mainly in the mind.
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Old 09-07-09, 07:42 AM   #4
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Age is mainly in the mind.
Sounds good.

No one has ever lived past 120. So if I were to believe the above, everyone decides in their minds, to die after a certain point.

We get old. Things wear out. Heck, differentiated cells will only divide 120 times and then they stop and die.

No one lives forever.
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Old 09-07-09, 07:45 AM   #5
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One cyclist says it's when we quit exercising.
This is similar to what my doctor says - "Use it or lose it".
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Old 09-07-09, 07:55 AM   #6
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And, cycling is so much more than exercise. I think it freshens the mind and senses. I saw a hawk this morning while biking in the city. Cool!
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Old 09-07-09, 07:57 AM   #7
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We are living a lot longer now, and 50+ years is simply not old any more. I am 63 and compete with others my age who can perform at the level of most men in their 20's. Even men and women in their 80's are very fit and healthy. There are basically 3 factors that contribute to health and longevity: Proper diet, Vigorous exercise, and Healthy environment. We definitely can control the first 2 factors but not always the third. A few of us are unfortunate to have hereditary conditions that affect our health and longevity, but most of us can control our fates through a proper lifestyle.
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Old 09-07-09, 07:58 AM   #8
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Sounds good.

No one has ever lived past 120. So if I were to believe the above, everyone decides in their minds, to die after a certain point.

We get old. Things wear out. Heck, differentiated cells will only divide 120 times and then they stop and die.

No one lives forever.
This is why I said "mainly", not "only".
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Old 09-07-09, 01:28 PM   #9
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When your wife says, "Those days are over for us now, dear."
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Old 09-07-09, 05:01 PM   #10
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When your wife says, "Those days are over for us now, dear."
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Old 09-07-09, 07:24 PM   #11
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When your wife says, "Those days are over for us now, dear."
I would take that as a clue that new routes and different paces are needed to invigorate the rides.
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Old 09-07-09, 07:47 PM   #12
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I think that there are very few people like Gene Teaney. There may be a few more striving to be like that but very few. I think less then 1% in the USA.
I have done two CC tours and do well over 10,000 miles per year on a bike. There is not one person around here doing that or anything like that.
The reason why we do such a thing is not obvious to others. It brings a feeling of well being. The food intake combined with burning it off generates a feeling few people understand unless they try doing it. Doing 120 miles/day for 25 days requires 5,000 calories/day.
The food addicts out there lick their chops just imagining that.
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Old 09-07-09, 09:57 PM   #13
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I'm not old, and I'm not getting old.

Despite certain physiological and hormonal changes, I generally wake up feeling like I did when I was 27. And as long as I wake up feeling that good, age is just a number -- one that I choose to ignore.

I'll be 55 next month. Thanks to a refusal to acknowledge my age, and good genes, I neither feel it nor look it. I intend to leverage that as long as possible.

YMMV.
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Old 09-08-09, 02:34 PM   #14
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We're old when we discover we have a favorite chair.
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Old 09-09-09, 04:08 PM   #15
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We're old when we discover we have a favorite chair.
One that still feels comfy after sitting in it for 6 hours.
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Old 09-09-09, 06:20 PM   #16
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My wife Kay, now age 74, has tandemed with me for over 225,000 miles.
There's more of us 'not so old folk' out there!
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Old 09-09-09, 06:35 PM   #17
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Let's see. I turned 60 this year and we are being questioned about when do we get old. Before I figure that out, I need to figure out what I am going to do when I grow up!!
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Old 09-09-09, 06:47 PM   #18
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Warning signs of getting old
I lost two people dear to me recently.
My Boss and Mentor was lost due to Huntington disease.
My life long friend is deteriorating very fast from Dementia.
Both indicated that they were in trouble when they no longer exercised and had to give up driving. That was like a Bell ringing. The other symptoms took longer to notice. Now they are both totally dependent on others to live.
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Old 09-09-09, 08:51 PM   #19
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I got a preview a couple weeks ago; I strained a muscle in my back while riding to work. And I'm only 46. Even though I pretty much toughed it out and missed no work time, I felt pretty helpless not being able to wash my own toes for a few days. I was off the bike for about a week and a half. Since getting back on, my mileage has jumped. I was doing about 80 miles a week before the back strain; here it is only Wednesday and I already have 80 miles in this week.

When I ride, I feel better, not just frame of mind (although that's a big part of it) but I can feel that my blood pressure is lower. Even though I'm a bit overweight (210 at 6'-2") I feel great as long as I'm getting my miles in.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 09-09-09, 10:01 PM   #20
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let's see. I turned 60 this year and we are being questioned about when do we get old. Before i figure that out, i need to figure out what i am going to do when i grow up!!


+1
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Old 09-11-09, 12:18 PM   #21
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"You don't quit playing when you get old, you get old when you quit playing."

As quoted from http://bamacyclist.com/mikesbio.htm

SB
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Old 09-11-09, 12:47 PM   #22
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I'm not old, and I'm not getting old. . .
Sorry you couldn't make the Knoxville Double this year Red. Maybe in 2010?

Best Regs,
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Old 09-11-09, 01:11 PM   #23
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I am too old to work all day, but not too old to play all day. Second childhood anyone?
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