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-   -   Trued My Wheels Tonight (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/584044-trued-my-wheels-tonight.html)

BikeWNC 09-11-09 08:29 PM

Trued My Wheels Tonight
 
Took 5 minutes. LOL. I have to love having wheels that stay true. I have a Park TS-2 truing stand and tension meter but hardly needed either one. The Shimano 7950 24CL wheels have been great. I had to do the usual couple of touch up tension checks in first month but since then, almost a year later, they have stayed right on. I also checked my training powertap rear wheel but it didn't need a thing. I guess it is overbuilt by today's standards with an Open Pro rim, 32 2X 15/16 spokes.

stapfam 09-12-09 12:18 AM

I will take out the slight wobbles in my wheels and I am pretty good at that- but 3 retrues and the wheels go into my builder. I reckon that there are somethings it is better to pay the experts to do and wheel building and trueing is one of those skills that others have more proficiency at than me.

KDC1956 09-12-09 04:13 AM

trueing up wheels
 
Yea right when I try to do this I end up with a mess up rim.lol Now days I take it to my LBS they don't charge much do do it so I let them do it that way I get a much better ride:thumb:

Retro Grouch 09-12-09 08:35 AM

Wow! That's some range of personal experience. I guess that's why they have both chocolate and vanilla.

The Smokester 09-12-09 09:10 AM

I have taken to building my own wheels now. Have stand, tensiometer and dishing gauge. My experience is the same...Touch up a new wheel after the first few hundred miles, check the tension and it will last for 10,000's of miles barring an accident.

BikeWNC 09-12-09 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Smokester (Post 9661628)
I have taken to building my own wheels now. Have stand, tensiometer and dishing gauge. My experience is the same...Touch up a new wheel after the first few hundred miles, check the tension and it will last for 10,000's of miles barring an accident.

That really is the key to it, getting that proper tension back after the first few good rides. It is so important to not wait too long before the first check. I usually do the tuneup after the first couple weeks and then again after a month. After that, all a well built wheel will need is a very minor touch up once a season.

maddmaxx 09-12-09 10:01 AM

I built my own for several years.....I even built a few for others along the way. They were better versions of the traditional wheel than I could buy.

Lately I've returned to buying wheels from Mavic because I cannot purchase the materials used in those wheels for less than it costs to buy the wheel itself. MTB wheels from Mavic in the Crossride, Crosstrail series have a unique construction of special hubs that accomodate straight pull spokes and enoumously strong spokes and rim systems. Check tension, retrue, yes. Build from scratch......not any more.

John E 09-12-09 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BikeWNC (Post 9659842)
... I guess it is overbuilt by today's standards with an Open Pro rim, 32 2X 15/16 spokes.

That is not overbuilt at all (36 spokes might be). :)

I ride 32- and 36-spoke wheels exclusively and have not desire to switch to reduced spoke counts, paired spokes, etc. The higher the spoke count, the greater the wheel's strength-to-weight ratio. I favor 3X, although 2X front is probably acceptable. Radial spoking puts one hellacious load on the hub flange.

BluesDawg 09-12-09 03:22 PM

The best way to learn to true wheels without messing them up is to build some wheels.

maddmaxx 09-12-09 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John E (Post 9662688)
That is not overbuilt at all (36 spokes might be). :)

I ride 32- and 36-spoke wheels exclusively and have not desire to switch to reduced spoke counts, paired spokes, etc. The higher the spoke count, the greater the wheel's strength-to-weight ratio. I favor 3X, although 2X front is probably acceptable. Radial spoking puts one hellacious load on the hub flange.

Through the last few years, I have built radially spoked front wheels for big guys (200/230lb range). It has always been my opinion that the radial was the strongest wheel I could put together............assuming that the hub could handle the load. I have never had a Shimano show any signs of damage from such a build and the modern hubs 105 and up are rated by Shimano for a radial front load.

I have just come off of 3 years on a set of Mavic 24 spoke Crossride disc wheels which after the initial tension check have not needed an adjustment or truing in spite of being used on dirt, traprock, potholes, ruts etc. This all has been under a 220 lb rider..........me :o

The real strength in a wheel is in its rim. Spokes are there to keep the rim round and to keep it from tacoing under side load. Modern box section or deep v rims have gotten quite a bit better in the last few years. Straight pull spokes eleminate another break point. Spokes that don't touch each other where they cross also don't wear at the cross point.

Edit: On the other hand, the new wheels coming in this week are 20 spokes front and rear...........:eek::lol::eek:


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