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    newbie

    I am looking to move up to a "real" road bike somewhere in the $2000 - $3000 range, preferably used. I have been commuting to work on my Fitness Hybrid Giant FCR. I will keep it for commuting but am seeking something lighter for century rides, etc. So far I am considering a Litespeed Classic and a Fuji SL1 but am open to any brand. I am specifically looking for advice/opinions on titanium versus carbon, etc. Thank you

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    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    A little more information please. What I can assess is that you want a road bike that you can ride a century on. Are you leaning more towards performance or is there a little room for comfort. I have two road bikes, a classic steel road bike, performance geometry but still very comfortable on long rides. I also have a performance road bike (CF) - stiffer and lighter but not as comfortable on longer rides. I do not have a Ti bike, I suspect they would be a slightly lighter ride but similar to steel and a good choice.

    I would look at a Serrotta - they are known for comfort and performance.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
    A little more information please. What I can assess is that you want a road bike that you can ride a century on. Are you leaning more towards performance or is there a little room for comfort. I have two road bikes, a classic steel road bike, performance geometry but still very comfortable on long rides. I also have a performance road bike (CF) - stiffer and lighter but not as comfortable on longer rides. I do not have a Ti bike, I suspect they would be a slightly lighter ride but similar to steel and a good choice.

    I would look at a Serrotta - they are known for comfort and performance.
    Entirely perfect information. ......... I'll add, WHY USED ? I meen at THAT price. I can list a dozen excellant choices new but used streches the perameters exponentially, it torpedoes any hope for me to offer suggestions with reasonable brevity.

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    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by old and new View Post
    Entirely perfect information. ......... I'll add, WHY USED ? I meen at THAT price. I can list a dozen excellant choices new but used streches the perameters exponentially, it torpedoes any hope for me to offer suggestions with reasonable brevity.
    A used bike at that price would have to be gold plated -at least- and in immaculate condition- So we are looking at a new Bike---Hopefully.

    Major problem in that the choices are vast- so narrow it down a bit.

    What bikes do the local shops (LBS) sell? it is generraly accepted that you will have a favourite shop that will treat you right and will look after you. All you have to do is find it and that can be a problem.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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    newbie

    Sorry,
    As my user name implies, I'm new at this game. You guys did not see my introduction where I explained I have been commuting to work on what I understand is referred to as a "Fitness Hybrid". Again, almost all of this terminology is new to me. So, I will keep my commuter but was looking to buy an additional bike that I would only ride on weekends, dedicated bike trails, organized centuries, etc. The $2000 - $3000 range is my budget and I just figured you could get a "better" bike for less money buying used, similar to cars. The original owner suffers most of the depreciation and so forth is my logic. For instance, today I looked at a 2008 Fuji SL1 with all DuraAce components, HED Ardennes wheel set and Ritchey handlebars and stem for $2800. When I look for this bike new it seems to run around $6500. Also, do you or anyone else you know have an opinion on titanium versus carbon? I am also considering a 2003 Litespeed Classic.

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    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    A major concern, as I see it, is bike fit.

    Your comfort on a road bike will be much more sensitive to bike dimensions and the like than for your hybrid.

    With a used bike, you have limited options for a good fit. If you are not familiar with the concept of a bike fit, folks spend a lot of money and time fine-tuning a bike to their riding style and dimentsions.

    Things like the proportion of your body - short legs, long body(me) or long legs, short body, make a real difference in the brand and type of bike one might purchase.

    You can get a really good new bike for $2-3,000.

    Personally, I would go to a really good local bike shop and see if you can find someone very knowledgeable, explain your riding desires, and see what happens. A really good shop will take a lot of time with you on these issues, as well as your body type.

    One of the things you are buying, besides a bike, is a good relationship with a Local Bike SHop. (LBS)

    I would not buy used on my first road bike. Too many things can go wrong, and your expensive road bike may end up hanging in the garage if you don't thoroughly enjoy how it feels.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

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    newbie

    Good advice Fox man. I'll definitely take that into consideration. I think I might be at that "tweener" age (49) where I want to go fast but I also appreciate comfort.

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    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    I would not buy used on my first road bike. Too many things can go wrong, and your expensive road bike may end up hanging in the garage if you don't thoroughly enjoy how it feels.
    In general this is good advice but with research you can go used and establish a good LBS relationship. When I bought my first serious raod bike I picked out an LBS after shopping around a bit. I also did a lot of bike research on my own so I new about what I wanted. My LBS had new road bikes and used road bikes. Since I established a relationship, they knew what I wanted and what I wanted to spend, they showed me several used bikes and frames - they also did a fitting so they knew what size bike was right for me. They recommended I buy used and showed me two frames that fit my size and requirements. One was a beautiful Simoncini, columbus XLS tubing and nickel plated - the other a Bianchi. I choose the Simoncini and they built it with Campy components. Thats was over 15 years ago and I still love that bike - I replaced the drive train last year with new campy carbon chorus.

    Soooo you can have used and a relationship with an LBS.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

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    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
    Soooo you can have used and a relationship with an LBS.
    That is a great LBS - not too many like that.

    Great plan, glad it worked out for 15 years. Longer than some marriages.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    That is a great LBS - not too many like that.

    Great plan, glad it worked out for 15 years. Longer than some marriages.
    Yes it was a great LBS, they only lasted another 3 years and then they folded. I have not found one that good since.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

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    Senior Member RoMad's Avatar
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    I have a Litespeed Tuscany that I bought used and I really like it a lot. I started out on a borrowed aluminum bike, then bought a new aluminum Lemond road bike. One day while in N.C. on business I stopped in a shop and tried out a used 57cm Litespeed Tuscany and it fit well and rode great. I made them an offer on it but they declined. I then began looking on ebay and craigslist and found my Tuscany on ebay. From my experience I would highly recommend a Ti bike. They ride nice, they look good, they are very durable and they hold their value well.
    I have had my Litespeed a couple of years and it is still worth at least what I paid for it.
    As far as carbon, I have only ridden one carbon bike ever. It is my neighbors and I took it around a couple of blocks so I can't really comment on it.
    I think your idea of buying used is a very good one. If you don't like it or decide you want something else you can get most if not all of your money back. From my experience if you show up at your LBS with a used bike they will still be happy to work on it and sell you lots of extras. Good luck and don't forget to post pics of your new bike.

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    At the price range you're talking about there's no reason not to go with a new bike. You can buy lots of bike at that price.

    Older riders like "plush" bikes, ones that damp out most of the bumps and vibrations from the road.

    The Specialized Roubaix series seems to have a lot of fans on this forum.

    I own a Lemond Buenos Aires. It's full carbon. It's pretty plush. You can make a plush bike plusher by installing wider tires on it.

    I've never ridden a Ti bike but I've never met anyone who had anything bad to say about their Litespeeds.

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    I have some experience with Ti vs CF. First, many in my club have Ti bikes. The majority have CF, of course. When a CF crashes and the frame is involved it is pretty much finished...And from personal experience a CF doesn't need to crash to incur expensive repairs. The stems from the fact that is hard to determine the significance of the damage of CF through nondestructive testing. However, compared to Ti, CF is the least expensive entre to low weight road bikes.

    I have seen several Ti crashes and heard of more. Often the components need replacing but never the frames. Ti frames seem to go on forever.

    It seems that a Ti-framed bike will last a lifetime. Thus you should really know what you want before springing for such a large investment.

    I personally own a Ti recumbent. Subjectively, it seems to have a compliant, buzz-absorbing ride compared to the Al version of the same bike and it is lighter than either the Al or Steel versions.

    By asking here, you will get lots of good ideas, but in the end, real knowledge that guides you to the bike you want can only be gained through experience. I would suggest that you not go into the next bike thinking it will be the ultimate. Rather, think of it as an intermediate step which will give you the understanding to buy the next one which really could be ultimate bike for you.

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    I can't comment on which bike to buy, but I'd be concerned that even a very good LBS can't anticipate the fit you'll want/need after adapting to a road bike. Why not pick up something decent used (that you can probably turn for the same sale price) and use that sort out fit. Yes, it may be Al and not as comfy as Ti or won't have the CF frame of a high end back. Nor will it necessarily have a great drive train, but I believe you'll figure out the basic geometry that works for you and allow your body to adapt to a road bike.
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    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
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    When I went for my first road bike, I had my mind set on steel. Now I hardly ride the steel bike. Its just that the carbon bike does so much more.

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    I can't comment on CF as I've never owned nor ridden one.
    I have a '99 Merlin Classic that I've owned and ridden for 10 years. It's the best riding bike I've owned/ridden...been on aluminum, a Basso Ti frame that was also awesome and too many varied steel bikes.
    I prefer Ti because of its' durability, ease of care and especially the ride. It is smooth and absorbs much of the road vibration though not dulling the ride feel.
    As has been stated Ti seems to last forever, can take a hell of a beating and does not suffer from the dings and nicks that painted frames can and do suffer from. Every couple of years I remove the stickers, buff the frame with Scotch Brite pads, apply a new sticker kit and the frame looks brand new for very little cost.

    I'm not trying to convince you that Ti is the way to go. I have an old damaged Colnago frame that I've had and raced on over 20 years ago. I'd love to have a new Colnago CF frame but don't want to spend the amount of money they cost...

    I suggest you go to some shops and look around, perhaps try out varied bikes. There are so many available and at your budget there are a lot of very nice bikes available.
    Perhaps it would be a worthwhile investment to get "fitted" to find out what frame size, top tube length, etc. would be "right" for you if you want to go the "used" route before taking the plunge on a frame/bike that may turn out to be an incorrect size.
    You can, as you describe, do very well buying a used bike BUT there could be serious pitfalls if you are not careful and are unlucky beyond not getting the right size...has the bike been crashed or damaged in some way?, is there something wrong with it that is not described?...You don't get a warranty and don't get to see the bike until you've paid for it and it arrives...ugly situation if the bike is not what was expected.

    Good luck and keep us informed.

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    I needed to purchase a fast road bike. The CF or TI question was foremost in my mind.
    Here is how I made that decision:
    I have a friend who owns a busy LBS in Michigan. He is a Racer. MTB and Road. He is several levels above what I will ever be. He can afford to buy whatever he wants.
    -----------------
    I asked the question. He said that TI is like a spring and bounces for heavy guys like he is and I am.
    I double checked with a guy on this forum called "jppe".
    I bought a Trek Madone from this guy in Michigan. 400 miles away for a big discount price and never regretted it.
    Oh, there is one regret: I should have bought Dura Ace but that is where I chickened out.

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    newbie

    Can you define "heavy"? I weigh 225

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