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  1. #1
    Senior Member Trikin''s Avatar
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    What are they thinking.........

    I have owned my Catrike Trail since last July and have put on 2300k, I ride as often as my wife lets me (ha, ha, but close to the truth). If you know the Trail and for that matter most trikes, they tend to ride lower than most bikes. I've been riding a trike 4+ yrs (1st trike was the RotatorC3). I've run across many people wanting to know all about the trike and I am happy to talk about it. While most ages love the trike concept, there's an age group(45-50ish) that seem to see the trike as some form of physically challenged vehicle(I don't know) but when I see them glance down then quickly look away, I feel sorry that they might never feel the freedom my trike gives me. This seems to be usual occurrence on the rides I take (road or trail). I'll be 57 in a few weeks and since I've been riding my trike I think I'm getting younger......hmmm
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  2. #2
    cycling fanatic Ken Brown's Avatar
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    I know nothing about trikes and don't think I have ever seen one. I would think it would be a good vehicle for touring, but don't know what advantages it might have over a recumbent bike. It must be heavier.

  3. #3
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    Looks cool enough, we don't discriminate here. Heck, some of our members have been known to ride a fixie
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  4. #4
    Some guy with a bike serra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post
    Looks cool enough, we don't discriminate here. Heck, some of our members have been known to ride a fixie
    GASP!
    Cool looking bike by the way

  5. #5
    Senior Member Terex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trikin' View Post
    I have owned my Catrike Trail since last July and have put on 2300k, I ride as often as my wife lets me (ha, ha, but close to the truth). If you know the Trail and for that matter most trikes, they tend to ride lower than most bikes. I've been riding a trike 4+ yrs (1st trike was the RotatorC3). I've run across many people wanting to know all about the trike and I am happy to talk about it. While most ages love the trike concept, there's an age group(45-50ish) that seem to see the trike as some form of physically challenged vehicle(I don't know) but when I see them glance down then quickly look away, I feel sorry that they might never feel the freedom my trike gives me. This seems to be usual occurrence on the rides I take (road or trail). I'll be 57 in a few weeks and since I've been riding my trike I think I'm getting younger......hmmm
    It's great that you enjoy riding your trike, but why would it give you any more (or even as much) "freedom" than regular bikes? If I were to consider a trike, here are my immediate thoughts.

    It's unwieldy to handle compared to a diamond framed bike, or even most recumbents. You can't just throw it into, or on, most vehicles. You can't realistically take it with you on a plane.

    I wouldn't be able to ride next to someone and chat, or ride in a paceline, or climb most of the hills around me. If I stop for coffee, I'd need a full parking spot. On narrow or busy roads, I'd be difficult to pass.

    If the bridge is out - I couldn't pick up my trike and walk across. Even if the bridge is fully functional, I would not be able to cross using the narrow bike/pedestrian lanes.

    I think that may be why people look askance when they see you riding. Most people would never consider riding something with so many limitations unless they had some physical infirmity that prevented them from riding a more traditional bike.
    "It could be anything. Scrap booking, high-stakes poker, or the Santa Fe lifestyle. Just pick a dead-end and chill out 'till you die."

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Yes, please elaborate on the "freedom" aspect and how it works for you. I don't want to miss out on something good here.

    Jim

  7. #7
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by serra View Post
    GASP!
    Cool looking bike by the way
    Trike.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  8. #8
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terex View Post
    It's great that you enjoy riding your trike, but why would it give you any more (or even as much) "freedom" than regular bikes? If I were to consider a trike, here are my immediate thoughts.

    It's unwieldy to handle compared to a diamond framed bike, or even most recumbents. You can't just throw it into, or on, most vehicles. You can't realistically take it with you on a plane.

    I wouldn't be able to ride next to someone and chat, or ride in a paceline, or climb most of the hills around me. If I stop for coffee, I'd need a full parking spot. On narrow or busy roads, I'd be difficult to pass.

    If the bridge is out - I couldn't pick up my trike and walk across. Even if the bridge is fully functional, I would not be able to cross using the narrow bike/pedestrian lanes.

    I think that may be why people look askance when they see you riding. Most people would never consider riding something with so many limitations unless they had some physical infirmity that prevented them from riding a more traditional bike.
    Sly Stone: Different Strokes for Different Folks......
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  9. #9
    Dharma Dog lhbernhardt's Avatar
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    They race trikes ("barrows") in England. I understand they are very tricky to ride - most experienced 2-wheel riders will hop on a trike and start going around in circles the first time they need to turn. They can build them really light, so you can carry them over streams.
    I've always thought a trike would be perfect in the winter, riding on snow and ice, except that you'd need some form of limited-slip differential so that you'd get drive from both back wheels. Otherwise, you're likely to be spinning the one driven wheel uselessly on the icy patch.
    Anyway, good for you for adding some diversity to the cycling world. And yes, I have been known to ride a fixie on occasion...

    Luis

  10. #10
    Senior Member Trikin''s Avatar
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    I have osteo-arthritis in my wrists and can't lean on the handle bars anymore, so the direct steer works for me, the mesh seat is the most comfortable for me so far, no saddle sores. My Trail weighs just 33lbs and is easy to lift into my pick-up truck bed, the width is 33in. about the width of your shoulders when riding a DF. I ride on some trails but the bulk of my riding is on the street, and the trike isnt ignored like most bikes are. I`m often asked how fast can it go, I can cruise at 20-25k on the flats and sure its a little slower on the hills but the downhills are a rush and I go as fast as I dare. The advantage over a recumbent bike is I have 3 wheels compared to 2 and never have to put my feet down if I don`t need to.

  11. #11
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    I would buy a trike except i havent found one for a 275 lb clyde.

  12. #12
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
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    I believe that the catrike trail as shown in the pic has 2 front wheels and only 1 driven rear wheel and that this should ease the worry over differentials. I'm told that they climb hills very well as they will travel at any speed you can pedal without falling over. The steering is indeed a bit tricky though.

  13. #13
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    Nice Trike! I often ride my Tour Easy along with Trikers on group rides and see no dis-advantages to riding a trike except maybe transporting them via motor vehicle, and then only for those with small vehicles.

    If I tire out on a hill and need to rest it's a bit trickier for me on two wheels than for those on three who just set the brake, lean back and relax a spell. The Trikes don't seem to have any balance issues at extremely slow speeds either.

  14. #14
    Alan BritGuyNJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhbernhardt View Post
    They race trikes ("barrows") in England. I understand they are very tricky to ride ...

    Luis
    They tend to look like this though, not low-profile at all:

  15. #15
    Senior Member gcottay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trikin' View Post
    . . . seem to see the trike as some form of physically challenged vehicle(I don't know) but when I see them glance down then quickly look away, I feel sorry that they might never feel the freedom my trike gives me . . .
    I think you are imagining a mental and emotional life that may have no particular correspondence with reality. You might, for example, observe that some people stare at you "as if something were wrong."

    Good data is lacking, but trikes seem to be gaining an increasingly large market share.
    George
    Laissez les bon temps rouler

  16. #16
    Senior Member Terex's Avatar
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    . . . seem to see the trike as some form of physically challenged vehicle(I don't know) but when I see them glance down then quickly look away, I feel sorry that they might never feel the freedom my trike gives me . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Trikin' View Post
    I have osteo-arthritis in my wrists and can't lean on the handle bars anymore, so the direct steer works for me, ...
    The vast majority people wouldn't consider a trike unless they have a physical limitation that makes riding a standard bicycle problematic. You have a physical limitation. Now go ride your trike and enjoy the freedom it affords you.
    "It could be anything. Scrap booking, high-stakes poker, or the Santa Fe lifestyle. Just pick a dead-end and chill out 'till you die."

  17. #17
    Recreational/Utility bjjoondo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trikin' View Post
    I have owned my Catrike Trail since last July and have put on 2300k, I ride as often as my wife lets me (ha, ha, but close to the truth). If you know the Trail and for that matter most trikes, they tend to ride lower than most bikes. I've been riding a trike 4+ yrs (1st trike was the RotatorC3). I've run across many people wanting to know all about the trike and I am happy to talk about it. While most ages love the trike concept, there's an age group(45-50ish) that seem to see the trike as some form of physically challenged vehicle(I don't know) but when I see them glance down then quickly look away, I feel sorry that they might never feel the freedom my trike gives me. This seems to be usual occurrence on the rides I take (road or trail). I'll be 57 in a few weeks and since I've been riding my trike I think I'm getting younger......hmmm

    The ONLY thing that keeps the Mrs. and I off a "Touring Trike" is "COSTS", ouch, wayyyyyyyy out of our budgets, RATS! The second reason, we do live in a "3rd. floor" 1-bedroom apartment, which "two trikes" would suck up a lot of space and would be a bit of a load to get up and down the stairs Otherwise, we'd be joining in the FUN with ya!
    Last edited by bjjoondo; 05-19-10 at 12:13 PM. Reason: change of wording
    Take care, RIDE SAFE, have FUN!
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  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terex View Post
    I wouldn't be able to ride next to someone and chat, or ride in a paceline, or climb most of the hills around me. If I stop for coffee, I'd need a full parking spot. On narrow or busy roads, I'd be difficult to pass.

    If the bridge is out - I couldn't pick up my trike and walk across. Even if the bridge is fully functional, I would not be able to cross using the narrow bike/pedestrian lanes.

    I think that may be why people look askance when they see you riding. Most people would never consider riding something with so many limitations unless they had some physical infirmity that prevented them from riding a more traditional bike.
    Riding next to someone to chat isn't that big a deal; the trail I normally ride on is too busy for the DF's to do it too. Riding in a paceline probably wouldn't work, but I don't do that anyway, nor do I have any desire to. As far as parking goes, you're right - trikes do take up more room. Hill climbing isn't a problem; most trikes have really low gearing, and you can just stop and rest any time you need to. Starting off again's not a problem, just ease of the brakes as you apply pressure to the pedals and you're rolling again - no wobbling or zig-zagging, just slow, steady progress.

    You might be surprised - my trike is only about 6" wider than I'd be on a regular bike anyway, but the perceived width tends to make drivers give you more room when they pass.

    If the bridge is out - I can pick up my trike and walk across with it. It's not easy (with everything in the rack bag and the accessories, it's pushing 75 lbs), but it's possible. On the other hand, if the bridge is out, I probably wouldn't cross it no matter what I was riding

    As far as the appearance goes, at the road crossings many more people will stop to let me cross than the DF's. So what if they think I'm in some sort of screwball wheelchair - I'd rather be across the road and zipping along the trail, instead of sitting there still waiting for the chance to cross!
    - Bob
    Last edited by rdmjr; 05-19-10 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Added responses to Terex's first paragraph
    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member NOS88's Avatar
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    Interesting observations. In my area I see five or six different riders per season on trikes (usually multiple times). I've always been somewhat amused that when I wave, nod my head, or say hello, I never get any response except eyes straight ahead on their part. It may be a mistake to try and imagine what others are thinking. So, I just keep moving on and greeting others I meet. I get similar reactions from some bent riders, and from some DF riders, and some tandem riders. I'd like to believe that what one is riding is less important than the fact that they are out riding.

    Edit: I forgot to mention that I've met a very strong young Cat 1 rider that I see on a weekly basis. He's always in full kit and riding very high end bikes. Yet, he smiles and waves to everyone he sees. When I first introduced myslef to him I commented on his "univeral" friendliness. His response was, "It's always good to make friends." A very smart young man IMHO.
    Last edited by NOS88; 05-19-10 at 04:25 PM.
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