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  1. #1
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    Seat pain on recent return to cycling.

    I am 51. I cycled for pleasure & exercise before moving from the midwest to the PNW, riding every other day, about 80 miles/week. I got away from this when we moved to Seattle, mostly on account of the frequent rain. I've recently decided to get my bike out (Trek 7100 hybrid), and on my 6th ride, was up to 16 miles in about an hour. This was 5 days ago. The last mile or so of this ride however, I developed a sharp pain in my left butt cheek, from the pressure of the seat (a "Terry Liberator") directly where my pelvis presses against the seat (looked it up, I think it's called the "ischium"). The pain stopped immediately when I would stand on the pedals, and only really hurts when I sit on the bike, or press that particular spot. It really is quite sore. I bought a "Bell" seat cover with pads, like the one in the pic, it's quite supportive yet compliant, yet still, simply sitting on the seat is really painful. I wonder if anything other than time might help this. I really am anxious to resume riding. Thoughts? BTW, I am not overweight.

    TIA

    Dan

    seat..jpg
    Last edited by Seattle Dan; 06-14-10 at 08:29 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member TomT74's Avatar
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    Well, cycling probably didn't become a pain in the a$$ while you were on your hiatus. As the risk of trespassing into TMI, you may want to consider doing the following:

    1. take a look and make sure there's no sore developing, i.e.boil
    2. make sure whatever you're wearing to ride in has no seams in that area
    3. make sure your shorts aren't bunched up underneath you if you prefer a baggy fit (no, I'm not saying you might have your p____ in a wad. 8-)
    4. bike shorts would probably help if you're not already riding in them

    Good luck - I'm sure you get it sorted out and will be back to having fun on the bike!
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  3. #3
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    Saddles are individual things. Usually extra padding is not a good thing whether it be in the shorts or in the saddle. However it sounds like you have something else going on here. You say this is a sharp pain, and I would assume you are tender at an individual spot. If this is the case do a little inspection of the area.
    Note that it does take awhile to toughen up.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
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  4. #4
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
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    I've explored the quest for the perfect seat issue for decades. I rode on the saddle that came on my 10-speed in the 70's for years. It was very predictable. Up to 20 miles I was good. Between 20 and 30 I went from discomfort to pain. From 30-40 I went beyond pain to numbness. I rode over 40 miles several times on that bike, including a century, and I just sucked it up, suffered, and rode.

    I bought a Nashbar tourer in 1992 with a Vetta gel saddle. Butt pain solved! I never got sore, on centuries, on a 4-week tour down the coast averaging 55 miles a day, never. Discomfort was as bad as it got.

    Unfortunately, that saddle wore out and the cover got torn to where I had to retire it. Since then I've tried at least 10 saddles, including another Vetta gel bought on Craigslist (they don't make them anymore) a Terry, two Specialized BG saddles, a Nashbar, and Avocet, etc. Eventually I bought a Brooks Champion Flyer (the B17 with springs). Finally! It's not quite as good as the Vetta - I get a little sore towards the end of a century, but not bad, and on a multi-day tour it starts to get painful after a few long days in a row. But it's the best since the Vetta.

    When I bought a "fast bike" - a Specialized Allez - I tried some racy saddles, which hurt, and finally broke down and put a black Brooks B17 on it. Nice! I think it's even more comfortable than the Champion Flyer (the one with the springs.)

    Saddles are very individual. I hear people recommend saddles that I've tried and rejected. I've also heard plenty of people unhappy with the Brooks that has been the best for me.

    I think the best solution would be to find a shop that would let you try out saddles - not for 10 minutes, but for a few long rides - until you find the one you like. Alternatively, you could do like I did - keep buying saddles until you find the one that works for you. You'll have a nice collection to put on a shelf (don't show your wife!) Maybe you and some friends can pool your money for the collection. Maybe you can sell the rejects on Ebay.

    Good luck. My experience has been that there really are saddles out there that are pretty comfortable, and it's DEFINITELY worth it to find one.

  5. #5
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
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    Simplest solution buy a recumbent.

    Im sure I will attract name calling and scorn from this. Anyone-anyone that say DF bikes are pain free with the "right fit" are simply less than truthful. Observe any group ride. When the group stops for a break, the DF riders immediately jump off their bikes, tug at their shorts, and shake out their hands. Bent riders ride up stop stay seated for a while take a swig of water and check out the area. Nuff said.

  6. #6
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    This may be a different problem to normal "Butt Ache" The normal symptom is sore feeling the saddle wherever it touches- so I would look at Saddle askew- foot position- Saddle completely set up wrong or even the ride position in general.

    But I think you have a problem that ought to be medically looked at.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member TomT74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
    Simplest solution buy a recumbent.

    Im sure I will attract name calling and scorn from this. Anyone-anyone that say DF bikes are pain free with the "right fit" are simply less than truthful. Observe any group ride. When the group stops for a break, the DF riders immediately jump off their bikes, tug at their shorts, and shake out their hands. Bent riders ride up stop stay seated for a while take a swig of water and check out the area. Nuff said.
    having ridden both bent and DF for many years, I'd caution one to avoid these generalizations. Bents can generate the well-known recumbutt malady if the seat impedes the right muscles. I sold a cherry Tour Easy because I could not ride it more than 20 miles at a stretch. My current bent uses a carbon euroshell seat from VeloKraft and it is comfy.

    To date, I've done one century and 3 metrics on a bent; but over a dozen of each on a DF. DF comfort is NOT an issue. And, the reason I get off my DF at rest stations on group rides is because I cannot reach the ground with both feet whilst in the saddle and don't feel like track standing. 8-)
    Ride Bike.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the replies. The thing is, this is the saddle I used when I was riding the bike previously, without trouble. At that time though, I put it on after I had worn out the original, softer one, so maybe I was "toughened up" by then. The discussion of recumbents vs DF (what does that stand for, btw?) is moot, for financial reasons. I think I'll give it a few more days, been walking instead, then maybe try a period on my stationary bike, which has a very wide saddle, and see how that goes.

    The trail I was on when this came up was also quite bumpy.

    Dan

  9. #9
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    DF = Diamond Frame.

  10. #10
    Senior Member NOS88's Avatar
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    I agree with Stapfam on this one. There might be something else going on you want to get check out with your MD.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member TomT74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Dan View Post
    Thanks for the replies. The thing is, this is the saddle I used when I was riding the bike previously, without trouble.
    All the more reason to suspect the organic half of the seat:seat interface. +1 on the eyeball check, and here's hoping for quick return to the bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seattle Dan View Post
    The trail I was on when this came up was also quite bumpy.
    You may have picked up a bone bruise from one of those bumps.
    Ride Bike.

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