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Old 07-24-10, 07:35 PM   #1
lendonovan
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seat recommendation

Can someone recommend a comfortable seat for my wife. We're casual riders, and over 50 years of age. Thanks for your help.
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Old 07-24-10, 07:37 PM   #2
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What type of bicycles?
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Old 07-24-10, 07:38 PM   #3
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Trek 100
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Old 07-24-10, 11:30 PM   #4
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They make a thousand different seats because there are that many variables...you're going to have to develop a relationship with your LBS and try a few...at least. Good luck.
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Old 07-24-10, 11:42 PM   #5
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The conversation is not with words the dialog is between the way the butt feels on a given saddle

Brooks Leather , Wider sit up more sorts with coil springs (?) need care and attention.

The Terry womens saddles made entirely of synthetics need less , Butt really
all I got is words.. may be a few test rides are in order?

High mileage has long favored Thick leather saddles ,
because the perspiration has somewhere to go with a permeable leather saddle ,
but inadequately cared for, that leather will break down faster than you wish ,
since current prices are over $100 for the leather Brooks stuff..
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Old 07-26-10, 03:18 PM   #6
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I hate to contradict the previous post, but if you intend to do distances of 15 miles plus and you go for a Brooks as your first saddle it could put you off cycling for life. They take time to soften up and shape themselves to your various little 'lumps and bumps'. If, however, you're just doing lots of shorter rides, then a Brooks will be fine, because you'll never get to the point where it starts to hurt.

Specialized do saddles of different widths - based on the width of your 'sit bones' - Spesh dealers should have a deformable pad that takes an impression of your butt, showing the width of the sit bones - and giving the size of saddle you need.

Finally - I was once told by an elderly and experienced cyclist, that all saddles become uncomfortable once your legs are tired. When that happens, don't blame the saddle - as you get fitter, and legs get stronger, the saddle may 'apparently' become more comfortable.
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Old 07-26-10, 03:29 PM   #7
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Don't let anyone talk you into a Brooks OR out of a Brooks. Find a local LBS and go try some different saddles. What is comfortable for me or my wife, may not be comfortable for you or your wife.

Saddle comfort is an interaction between you and the bike that is determined by height, weight, and most important, position on the bike with the type of riding you do. Any recommendations without knowledge of these items is useless.
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Old 07-26-10, 05:31 PM   #8
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I'm right at home on my Terry Men's Liberator. Mens' and Ladies' versions. canopus is correct to point out that what is comfortable for one person, may not work at all for someone else.
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Old 07-26-10, 05:47 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canopus View Post
Don't let anyone talk you into a Brooks OR out of a Brooks. Find a local LBS and go try some different saddles. What is comfortable for me or my wife, may not be comfortable for you or your wife.

Saddle comfort is an interaction between you and the bike that is determined by height, weight, and most important, position on the bike with the type of riding you do. Any recommendations without knowledge of these items is useless.
+1
the suggestions are just that, try them all but only you can say what is best for you. And when trying them try them for a least a week and the longer the ride the better.
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Old 07-26-10, 07:19 PM   #10
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If you are not put off by those who do not like Brooks (I happen to like them), there are different styles for ladies, made for the different types of riding. If you do not want to go through a long break-in period, there are pre-softened models of many styles.
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Old 07-27-10, 09:07 AM   #11
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We understand where you're coming from. You ask a simple question to which there is no simple answer. There are many different saddles because everyone's backside is different. The simple, direct, and most effecient answer is to call a LBS you trust, tell them what you want, and schedule an appointment with them. Ask them if they have an exchange policy. Many LBS have an in store policy that allows you to purchase a saddle and try it for a certain time period. Your LBS may also suggest a fitting for your bicycle. Don't under estimate the importance of being properly fitted to your bicycle.
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Old 07-27-10, 09:42 AM   #12
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Many women, including my wife, have had great success with the Terry saddles.
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Old 07-27-10, 12:04 PM   #13
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While fit is a personal thing, there are certainly some brands that have been found to be the right fit by a larger number of riders than other brands. For me (and apparently a lot of people), it turned out to be Terry - specifically the Terry Fly. I got a race for the cure model with a pink ribbon logo, Italian leather, for $35, because I guess they didn't sell a lot the men's version of that. But don't get caught up in what is a men's or women's seat. That has to do mostly with the width, and some men like a wider seat (it's the space between your sit bones that matters), which is easier to find in the "women's" models.
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Old 07-27-10, 12:23 PM   #14
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Every time this question comes up the same answers are given. Some like one saddle some like another. What works for you may not work for your wife. Some saddle advocates are more vocal that others but the one piece of advice that is golden is try before you buy or expect to have a shelf full of saddles. Metric man has a collection and had I not sold off some of mine I would be in the same shape. The second thing is be sure you are used to riding and that you have your bike set up correctly before you assume the whole problem is the saddle.

There are no magic saddles that fit every bottom.
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Old 07-27-10, 09:52 PM   #15
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My wife has leather Terry Liberator X's on three of her bikes (four if you include the mountain bike she just gave to our grandson) She rode across the US on one and has one on her road bike. The third (the oldest) will go on the new touring bike we are building for her. All her bikes have drop bars so all the weight is not on the saddle. As everyone said, saddles are a personal thing and it is best to try them. She has tried at least a half dozen different saddles, and settled on the Terry's. I think she likes them The gel saddles are too soft for long rides.
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Old 07-28-10, 04:23 AM   #16
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Well, as they said, everyone has an opinion and everyone has a different butt. I've got the Selle An-Atomica on my road bike. The tension screw allows for some adjustment for individual comfort and I think that makes it more adaptable to different butt configurations than most other saddles. On my Cargo bike I now have a moon saddle. I use this because I find it doesn't chafe with street pants so I can just hop on the bike wearing whatever and not be chafed when I get back. All my rides with the cargo bike are short. One nice thing with the Selle An-Atomica is that it comes with a really useful guide on fitting the saddle.
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Old 07-28-10, 06:27 AM   #17
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I put $250 between my frame and my butt. It works wonderfully but I think it may be due to the thinner wallet
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Old 07-28-10, 10:29 AM   #18
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Old 07-28-10, 11:47 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
I hate to contradict the previous post, but if you intend to do distances of 15 miles plus and you go for a Brooks as your first saddle it could put you off cycling for life. They take time to soften up and shape themselves to your various little 'lumps and bumps'. If, however, you're just doing lots of shorter rides, then a Brooks will be fine, because you'll never get to the point where it starts to hurt.

Specialized do saddles of different widths - based on the width of your 'sit bones' - Spesh dealers should have a deformable pad that takes an impression of your butt, showing the width of the sit bones - and giving the size of saddle you need.

Finally - I was once told by an elderly and experienced cyclist, that all saddles become uncomfortable once your legs are tired. When that happens, don't blame the saddle - as you get fitter, and legs get stronger, the saddle may 'apparently' become more comfortable.
I found that I do better with a narrow saddle; so, I never considered a Brooks. I am probably the exception. It also may seem counter intuitive that a narrow saddle could be more comfortable.
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Old 08-01-10, 09:40 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
I hate to contradict the previous post, but if you intend to do distances of 15 miles plus and you go for a Brooks as your first saddle it could put you off cycling for life. They take time to soften up and shape themselves to your various little 'lumps and bumps'. If, however, you're just doing lots of shorter rides, then a Brooks will be fine, because you'll never get to the point where it starts to hurt.

Specialized do saddles of different widths - based on the width of your 'sit bones' - Spesh dealers should have a deformable pad that takes an impression of your butt, showing the width of the sit bones - and giving the size of saddle you need.

Finally - I was once told by an elderly and experienced cyclist, that all saddles become uncomfortable once your legs are tired. When that happens, don't blame the saddle - as you get fitter, and legs get stronger, the saddle may 'apparently' become more comfortable.
I have owned both the Brooks B-17 and the Brooks Flyer, and both felt great right out of the box, got better with every mile as the sit-bones make their impression. The Flyer actually felt the best, probably because it's sprung, unlike the B-17. The springs allow me to ride my roadie without pain from my bad back. Best saddle ever made.
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