Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 53 of 53
  1. #51
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Paoli, Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
    Posts
    9,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is calling out "on your left" a cycling thing? Do cyclists say this when passing other cyclists?

    I ask because I don't know why cyclists use it on a MUP for the purpose of hoping walkers stay to the right. Few walkers are familiar with the term. It isn't a phrase that any of them would ever use. When they drive cars and see someone coming up to pass them, they aren't thinking that other car is "on their left." Fact is that most people riding bikes on MUPs are short distance commuters & casual riders and they don't use the term either. I found that they don't react well to it either.

    I've wondered if it is used because cyclists believe the listener is familiar with the term and knows how to react to it.

  2. #52
    My own worst nightmare
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI USA
    Posts
    1,237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil View Post
    Is calling out "on your left" a cycling thing? Do cyclists say this when passing other cyclists?

    I ask because I don't know why cyclists use it on a MUP for the purpose of hoping walkers stay to the right. Few walkers are familiar with the term. It isn't a phrase that any of them would ever use. When they drive cars and see someone coming up to pass them, they aren't thinking that other car is "on their left." Fact is that most people riding bikes on MUPs are short distance commuters & casual riders and they don't use the term either. I found that they don't react well to it either.

    I've wondered if it is used because cyclists believe the listener is familiar with the term and knows how to react to it.
    Precisely why I've given up on anything verbal. So far the bell / squeak-horn has been more effective, and I think it's because it activates the same part of the brain that a car horn does, and that's what most people, even when they're not in their cars, are accustomed to.

  3. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
    Precisely why I've given up on anything verbal. So far the bell / squeak-horn has been more effective, and I think it's because it activates the same part of the brain that a car horn does, and that's what most people, even when they're not in their cars, are accustomed to.
    maybe that's why some people turn around and scowl at me. It's not a lot, but I would say it's a good 20%, about 1/5 peds.

    It's interesting that we all have different experiences with this. I personally find "on your left" to be more effective, but I'd much rather use a bell. Maybe it has something to do with the specific peds we are encountering. Mine are usually middle aged/older ladies out for their morning walk, sometimes with a dog. I think my bell was an imposition to their morning walk, and they'd rather have another person engange them verbally instead of making a noise toward them (even if it is a pleasant little bell).

    On my way home in the evening, the only non-cyclists I encounter are joggers and they ALL have ear buds in, so it doesn't matter. Plus they're good about keeping to the right, or even jogging just off the pavement for a softer surface.
    Last edited by Justin J; 08-17-10 at 05:16 PM. Reason: s p e l l i n g

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •